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Re: [S-R] Help with Death Records

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  • J K Netro
    Hi Kris, Try using the Latin word list. I just found this out this week while looking at death records that Latin was used thru out Europe Hope this helps John
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 18, 2004
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      Hi Kris,

      Try using the Latin word list. I just found this out this week while
      looking at death records that Latin was used thru out Europe

      Hope this helps
      John
      Searching: Nyitray(i) and Bartko

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <krisstrot@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 11:14 AM
      Subject: [S-R] Help with Death Records


      >
      > Good Morning Group!
      > I am in the process of going through the films containing the birth,
      > death and marriage records of my grandfather's village. It is a treasure
      trove of
      > information. Luckily, I went armed with samples the records I'd be
      viewing,
      > which I located at www.bmi.net/jjaso . In fact, what I'm seeing on the
      film
      > is very close to the samples. (YAY!!) However, the list of Hungarian
      phrases
      > doesn't contain some of the words I've come across, especially in the
      "cause
      > of death" category. The FHC "Research Help" Hungarian List is quite
      extensive,
      > too, but I haven't found these word there, either. It is a distinct
      > possibility that I am not recognizing the letters as written for what they
      really are,
      > a common situation in researching these old records. I thought some of
      you
      > might recognize these words, even if I don't have all the letters correct:
      > gorcsok --- the O's have " marks above them --for a 5-day old boy
      > viakorsag --- the O and the second A have a ' mark above them, and I'm not
      > positive the first letter is V -- for a 54-year old woman
      > bilhums --- no accents -- for a 10-day old boy
      > najda ganah --- it could be all one word; the last letter could be a T
      > instead of H -- for a 67-year old man
      > spanyolmatha --- this was a tough one to puzzle out -- for a 36-year old
      > woman. In this case, several entries on the same page had this, so I'm
      wondering
      > if it was an epidemic of some sort.
      >
      > Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated!!
      >
      > Also, I found that when I got to the older records (prior to 1875 or so),
      the
      > information and headings were written in German. Can anyone direct me to
      a
      > site where I can find this information, particularly the HEADINGS of the
      > columns? I found some good information in the FHC "Research Help"
      section, but
      > deciphering old German Script and figuring out what German words they're
      supposed
      > to be is time consuming and tiring when sitting at a microfilm reader.
      Again,
      > any help will be appreciated!
      >
      > Kris
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
      http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
      SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Janet Kozlay
      The words are clearly Hungarian, though I can t translate them all with my dictionary. Gorcsok is convulsions. Nagygarat is probably tonsillitis. Spanyol is
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 18, 2004
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        The words are clearly Hungarian, though I can't translate them all with my
        dictionary.

        Gorcsok is convulsions.
        Nagygarat is probably tonsillitis.
        Spanyol is Spanish, so "spanyolmatha" might be Spanish flu.
        "Bilhums" doesn't look like any Hungarian word I can find. Better look at it
        again.

        Janet



        -----Original Message-----
        From: J K Netro [mailto:jknetro@...]
        Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 8:08 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [S-R] Help with Death Records


        Hi Kris,

        Try using the Latin word list. I just found this out this week while
        looking at death records that Latin was used thru out Europe

        Hope this helps
        John
        Searching: Nyitray(i) and Bartko

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <krisstrot@...>
        To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2004 11:14 AM
        Subject: [S-R] Help with Death Records


        >
        > Good Morning Group!
        > I am in the process of going through the films containing the birth,
        > death and marriage records of my grandfather's village. It is a treasure
        trove of
        > information. Luckily, I went armed with samples the records I'd be
        viewing,
        > which I located at www.bmi.net/jjaso . In fact, what I'm seeing on the
        film
        > is very close to the samples. (YAY!!) However, the list of Hungarian
        phrases
        > doesn't contain some of the words I've come across, especially in the
        "cause
        > of death" category. The FHC "Research Help" Hungarian List is quite
        extensive,
        > too, but I haven't found these word there, either. It is a distinct
        > possibility that I am not recognizing the letters as written for what they
        really are,
        > a common situation in researching these old records. I thought some of
        you
        > might recognize these words, even if I don't have all the letters correct:
        > gorcsok --- the O's have " marks above them --for a 5-day old boy
        > viakorsag --- the O and the second A have a ' mark above them, and I'm not
        > positive the first letter is V -- for a 54-year old woman
        > bilhums --- no accents -- for a 10-day old boy
        > najda ganah --- it could be all one word; the last letter could be a T
        > instead of H -- for a 67-year old man
        > spanyolmatha --- this was a tough one to puzzle out -- for a 36-year old
        > woman. In this case, several entries on the same page had this, so I'm
        wondering
        > if it was an epidemic of some sort.
        >
        > Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated!!
        >
        > Also, I found that when I got to the older records (prior to 1875 or so),
        the
        > information and headings were written in German. Can anyone direct me to
        a
        > site where I can find this information, particularly the HEADINGS of the
        > columns? I found some good information in the FHC "Research Help"
        section, but
        > deciphering old German Script and figuring out what German words they're
        supposed
        > to be is time consuming and tiring when sitting at a microfilm reader.
        Again,
        > any help will be appreciated!
        >
        > Kris
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
        http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
        SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >




        To unsubscribe from this group, go to
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      • krisstrot@aol.com
        In a message dated 12/18/2004 7:24:02 PM Central Standard Time, jknetro@kconline.com writes: Try using the Latin word list. I just found this out this week
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 19, 2004
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          In a message dated 12/18/2004 7:24:02 PM Central Standard Time,
          jknetro@... writes:
          Try using the Latin word list. I just found this out this week while
          looking at death records that Latin was used thru out Europe
          Thanks for the tip, John. The sample forms I downloaded did show the
          headings in Hungarian, Latin and English. The church records I'm viewing are the
          Evangelical church. There was also a Roman Catholic church in the town. Those
          records were filmed, also, and were written in Latin. Makes sense, since the
          services would have been conducted in Latin until the mid-1900's; however, my
          relatives were not Catholic.
          Kris


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • krisstrot@aol.com
          In a message dated 12/18/2004 9:27:35 PM Central Standard Time, ... Bill, I will do that if all else fails. The FHC is now closed for the holidays, and the
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 19, 2004
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            In a message dated 12/18/2004 9:27:35 PM Central Standard Time,
            bill.tarkulich@... writes:

            >>It would be far easier if you can post the scan. <<

            Bill, I will do that if all else fails. The FHC is now closed for the
            holidays, and the day I first went there, their microfilm copy machine broke for
            good and is not expected to be replaced for quite some time. But scanning is an
            excellent idea, and I will pursue that once I can get copies of the pages.
            Thanks for the great idea!!

            >>You may be misreading the script and we could waste much time looking
            through hundreds of words. <<

            I have no doubt that my interpretation of the letters is part of the problem.
            My sister suggested I place a white sheet of paper on the viewing deck and
            trace the words I am having problems with. I will try that after the first of
            the year. I could scan that and post it to the picture file.

            >>>Can you identify the surrounding language? Some words look Magyar, but
            others look Latin. Do they all come from the same time period? What was
            the language of the header?<<<

            The header and words used for the entries are written in Hungarian, I am
            sure. Johann is spelled Janos, and Paul is spelled Pal, for example, and the
            occupations given (mostly "farmer" and "carpenter") I have found on the Hungarian
            word list. The first film runs from 1886 to 1943. I am mostly interested in
            the earlier information up to around 1920.

            >>What/where is your village?<<

            The villages are Velky Slavkov (aka Nagy Szalok aka GroƟschlagendorf) and
            Neuwalddorf (aka Ujlesna aka Alsoerdofalva). Those two villages are referred to
            throughout the film by any of those names, depending on the year.

            Bill, thanks again for your thoughts.

            Kris


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • krisstrot@aol.com
            In a message dated 12/18/2004 9:36:42 PM Central Standard Time, ... Nagygarat is probably tonsillitis. Spanyol is Spanish, so spanyolmatha might be Spanish
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 19, 2004
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              In a message dated 12/18/2004 9:36:42 PM Central Standard Time,
              kozlay@... writes:

              >>Gorcsok is convulsions.
              Nagygarat is probably tonsillitis.
              Spanyol is Spanish, so "spanyolmatha" might be Spanish flu.
              "Bilhums" doesn't look like any Hungarian word I can find. Better look at it
              again.
              Janet<<


              Thanks for your input, Janet. I will definitely look again and hopefully
              post a better interpretation of what I am seeing when the FHC reopens in January.
              Kris


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • WHew536674@cs.com
              In a message dated 12/19/2004 10:51:17 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... Doesn t matter. The Catholic church kept all the records. In the town films I looked at,
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 19, 2004
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                In a message dated 12/19/2004 10:51:17 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                krisstrot@... writes:
                > however, my
                > relatives were not Catholic.
                > Kris

                Doesn't matter. The Catholic church kept all the records. In the town films
                I looked at, the Evangelical church was built in 1774. Prior to that the
                Catholic church recorded birth marriage and death records for the Evangelical
                folks as well as their own. As a result I was able to get back to 1668 with my
                Evangelical family through the Catholic church records. Don't overlook them
                because your relatives weren't Catholic. There was a slight over lap, from
                about 1774 - 1784 or so that I found both churches recording the same events. Was
                interesting because at times one would give more information than the other.
                Also interesting to see that vast majority of my Kristofiks, who were
                Catholic, switch over to the Evangelical church after it was built. I suspect there
                were some hard feelings back then to see half the congregation switch over to
                the Evangelical church.

                Joyce


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • WHew536674@cs.com
                In a message dated 12/19/2004 11:10:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... I have got some very clear and good results with a digital camera if you are in a hurry.
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 19, 2004
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                  In a message dated 12/19/2004 11:10:28 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                  krisstrot@... writes:
                  > their microfilm copy machine broke for
                  > good and is not expected to be replaced for quite some time.

                  I have got some very clear and good results with a digital camera if you are
                  in a hurry.

                  Joyce


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Janet Kozlay
                  There seems to be an inference that only the Catholic church would have used Latin in its records, which is untrue. For long periods, especially prior to the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 19, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    There seems to be an inference that only the Catholic church would have used
                    Latin in its records, which is untrue. For long periods, especially prior to
                    the 1840s, Latin was the language used for all church and other official
                    records regardless of religion.
                    Janet


                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: WHew536674@... [mailto:WHew536674@...]
                    Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2004 11:38 AM
                    To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [S-R] Help with Death Records


                    In a message dated 12/19/2004 10:51:17 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                    krisstrot@... writes:
                    > however, my
                    > relatives were not Catholic.
                    > Kris

                    Doesn't matter. The Catholic church kept all the records. In the town
                    films
                    I looked at, the Evangelical church was built in 1774. Prior to that the
                    Catholic church recorded birth marriage and death records for the
                    Evangelical
                    folks as well as their own. As a result I was able to get back to 1668 with
                    my
                    Evangelical family through the Catholic church records. Don't overlook them

                    because your relatives weren't Catholic. There was a slight over lap, from
                    about 1774 - 1784 or so that I found both churches recording the same
                    events. Was
                    interesting because at times one would give more information than the other.

                    Also interesting to see that vast majority of my Kristofiks, who were
                    Catholic, switch over to the Evangelical church after it was built. I
                    suspect there
                    were some hard feelings back then to see half the congregation switch over
                    to
                    the Evangelical church.

                    Joyce


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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