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Re: [S-R] Re: Austrians/Germans

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  • Thomas Reimer
    I guess they identified with the new state more than with the old. But in the US after WW I, sometimes people said Austrian instead of German when they meant
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 8, 2004
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      I guess they identified with the new state more than with the old. But in
      the US after WW I, sometimes people said "Austrian" instead of German when
      they meant their ethnicity. In the US, as you know, it could be rather rough
      to be a German after the wars. You'd need to have dates about these
      self-identifications, because they often changed.

      Thomas

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <jwm469@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2004 6:42 PM
      Subject: [S-R] Re: Austrians/Germans


      >
      > Thomas,
      >
      > I beg to differ. My mother's family is from Woppendorf, Burgenland,
      Austria. When they were born around 1900, they
      > were Hungarian citizens since Burgenland was part of Hungary. After WWI
      the province was given back to Austria.
      > My grandparents always said they were Austrian, not Hungarian. Their
      aunts and cousins and siblings who emigrated
      > to the US before them also claimed Austrian nationality. Incidentally, my
      grandfather has a Croatian surname, and my
      > grandmother is probably of Italian extraction. Both families were in that
      area of Austria for about 300 to 600 years
      > (according to family still living there.)
      >
      > Jerry
      >
      >
      >
      > >Message: 2
      > > Date: Mon, 6 Dec 2004 07:56:17 -0500
      > > From: "Thomas Reimer" <treimer@...>
      > >Subject: Re: Re: Austrians/Germans
      > >
      > >
      > >Austrian was a citizenship (of the Austrian Empire), not an ethnicity. An
      > >Austrian ethnicity was created only in 1945, well after my grandparents
      were
      > >born. The concept took a while to be accepted despite the obvious
      advantages
      > >it had for the Austrian-Germans, who would be less brutally treated than
      the
      > >Germans of Germany (1871 borders). Yet in 1956, despite official
      badgering,
      > >51% of the people of Austria still saw Austrians as part of the German
      > >nation, in 1990 still 23% did. So today the Austrians have become a
      Germanic
      > >nation, instead of being part of the German nation. Things change.
      > >
      > >
      > >Thomas
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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