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Re: [S-R] Of iks and yaks (was 'surname cabooses')

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  • Terry L. Karkos
    ... So, when I find Karkosiak or Karkosak or Karkoschak or Karkoska, or Karkosiakova (I know -ova means female) or Karkosch or Katulyak in my searches of the
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 10, 2004
      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, James McGrath
      <jamesfrankmcgrath@y...> wrote:
      > The -ik ending is a diminutive form. Thus my
      > ancestors' name Antolik comes from the name Antol with
      > the diminutive ending. Antolik is thus to Antol what
      > Johnny is to John. Presumably there was an ancestor
      > who was named Antol, nicknamed Antolik, and the name
      > became the family name because they were descended
      > from this individual. It is interesting that even
      > today in villages people are typically known not by
      > their surname so much as by a nickname that was given
      > to an ancestor at some point. Presumably in many cases
      > family names themselves arose through a similar
      > process.


      So, when I find Karkosiak or Karkosak or Karkoschak or Karkoska, or
      Karkosiakova (I know -ova means female) or Karkosch or Katulyak in my
      searches of the 1869 census, what I'm seeing are ancestral kin as for
      the Karkos diminutive endings (the Katula/Katulyak was an in-law for
      some of my ancestors)?

      I'm searching for Karkos, but I've found the name Karkos, as spelled,
      for two orphans in Garany born 1832 (my great-great-great
      grandfather's sister, Elizabeth) and 1834 (my great-great-great
      grandfather Andrej).

      So the Karkoses with the diminutive endings are family also? I
      wondered about that. The Karkosch is a pronunciation spelling of the
      name, I believe. I've only found that variation in Germany.

      Anyone know if the Hungarian Kardos is a variation of Slovak Karkos
      or vice versa? (Some of the Kardos families have a pretty wild
      looking coat of arms, and I think the Kardos name translates into
      swordsman or sword.)

      Or what Karkos means in Slovak, if anything. Am curious as to a
      possible reasoning behind the surname.

      My intention is to find all that I can find, then hire a Slovak
      genealogist in the homeland to dig further and fill in the blanks. It
      has been an amazing learning experience, backtracking my kin, one
      that I wish I could do 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Fascinating
      stuff to learn one's family history through the ages.

      -- Terry Karkos
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