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Re: [S-R] Re: Researching POSKOCIL, POKORNY

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  • Katharine Samuelson
    Hello Frank Thank you for your informative recap of history. Quite recently I joined S-R and was surprised as to the common name of Pospisil. My maiden name
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 22, 2004
      Hello Frank
      Thank you for your informative recap of history.
      Quite recently I joined S-R and was surprised as to the common name of
      Pospisil. My maiden name was Pospischil-presuming the Gemanization of the
      name. I was born in todays Croatia and now live in Canada.
      You may be able to answer my question. Were there records kept in the mid
      1700's of Maeherns that left for the Banat of Batschka?
      Thank you,
      Katharine from sunny Delta

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Frank" <frankur@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2004 8:24 AM
      Subject: [S-R] Re: Researching POSKOCIL, POKORNY



      Your surname Poskocil is probably a variant of the Czech surname
      Pospisil meaning "who was in a hurry" and which is about the
      22nd most common Czech surname.
      Pokorny meaning "humble, tame" is the 8th most common Czech surname.

      Czech-Bohemia (including Moravia 1849-1918) was a kingdom
      (10th century-1918) and part of the Österreichisch-ungarische
      Monarchie, or in English, Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.
      It was an Austrian Kronland (province)
      Both German and Czech languages were used.

      Mähren => Maehren => Marin => Moravia.
      Mähren was an Austrian Crownland located East of Böhmen (Bohemia).
      Its capital was Brünn (Brno).
      Mähren had been a separate crownland until 1849 when it became a part
      of Böhmen (Bohemia) together with Österreichisch-Schleisen
      (Austrian-Silesia).

      Before WW I, Slovakia was part of Upper-Hungary (Felvidék) and
      part of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy (1867-1918) and earlier the
      Austrian Empire.
      Hungarian and Slovak languages were used.

      The LDS-Mormons has filmed all the parish church records at six
      of the seven regional Slovak State Archives in Slovakia.

      These microfilms available through local LDS Family History Centers
      (FHC) serve as large resource of genealogical information for
      Americans with surnames from Slovakia.

      These microfilm reels are available for rental and viewing at any
      Family History Center (FHC) worldwide.
      90% of patrons are non-Mormons doing surname research.


      But the Czech government never permitted the LDS-Mormons to film the
      parish church records (tilingual; Latin-Czech-German) in the Czech
      Republic.

      (The Austrian Habsburgs, accustomed to being imperial, assumed the
      title of Emperor of Austria in 1804. Later, the "dual-monarchy" was
      established, with the Habsburgs as Emperors of Austria and Kings of
      Hungary, the combined realm being known as "Austria-Hungary")

      In 1920, a newly-formed country of Czechoslovakia was created from the
      Austrian Crownlands (Bohemia, Moravia and Austrian-Silesia) and a
      portion of Upper-Hungary (Slovakia and Karpatho-Ukraine).

      Some families of German ancestry had lived in Czech-Bohemia for many
      hundreds of years but after WW II they were forced to leave by the
      " Ausschluss " or Expulsion and return to Germany.

      The problems between the Germans and Czechs didn't begin until after
      the Munich Pact in 1938 which sold out Czechoslovakia to Nazi Germany.
      As a result of Munich Pact in 1938, Germany annexed large parts of
      Bohemia, Moravia, and all of Silesia.

      On May 5, 1945 the citizens of Praha (Prague) rose in united rebellion
      against the Germans. They also vented their pent-up anger against the
      Sudenten Germans.
      Of a total of 2.5 million Germans only 200,000 stayed.
      And the Soviet Army entered Praha on May 9, 1945.
      Overnight the Germans were driven from their homes with a minimum of
      personal possessions.
      200,000 died as a result of massacre, hunger, exhaustion or suicide.
      Then the Communist Czechs renamed all the former German named towns to
      multiple Czech names to lose their identities.

      EIR list only 7 surnames Pokocil but 217 surnames spelled Pospisil.

      How are you ? English

      Wie geht es Ihnen ? German

      Hogy Van ? Hungarian

      Jak se máte ? Czech

      Ako sa más^ ? Slovak

      Pennsylvania Dutch (Pennsilfaani-Deitsch), is a High German
      language spoken by 150,000 to 250,000 people in North America.
      The Amish in PA speak Pennsylvania Dutch.




      To unsubscribe from this group, go to
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    • Frank
      ... of ... of the ... the mid ... Katherine Grüss Gott Do you have a village name from Batschka for Maehern (Mähern ?)
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 22, 2004
        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Katharine Samuelson"
        <samuelson@t...> wrote:
        > Hello Frank
        > Thank you for your informative recap of history.
        > Quite recently I joined S-R and was surprised as to the common name
        of
        > Pospisil. My maiden name was Pospischil-presuming the Gemanization
        of the
        > name. I was born in todays Croatia and now live in Canada.
        > You may be able to answer my question. Were there records kept in
        the mid
        > 1700's of Maeherns that left for the Banat of Batschka?
        > Thank you,
        > Katharine from sunny Delta

        Katherine

        Grüss Gott

        Do you have a village name from Batschka for Maehern (Mähern ?)

        http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/ESE/dsbatsch.html#his

        http://teacher2b.com/batschka/batschka.htm

        With the spelling Pospischil you will find many surnames in Germany
        and Austria.

        In Czech-Bohemian orthography (spelling in accord with accepted usage)
        the surname was Poskoc^íl (pron. Poskocheel)

        There was also a Croatian minority arriving in Bratislava in mid 16th
        c.
        http://www.hr/darko/etf/croslov.html

        and Croats in Bohemia early on
        http://www.hr/darko/etf/cromor.html

        Ja sam iz Sjedinjenih Americ^kih Drz^ava.

        Frank K

        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Frank" <frankur@w...>
        > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2004 8:24 AM
        > Subject: [S-R] Re: Researching POSKOCIL, POKORNY
        >
        >
        >
        > Your surname Poskocil is probably a variant of the Czech surname
        > Pospisil meaning "who was in a hurry" and which is about the
        > 22nd most common Czech surname.
        > Pokorny meaning "humble, tame" is the 8th most common Czech surname.
        >
        > Czech-Bohemia (including Moravia 1849-1918) was a kingdom
        > (10th century-1918) and part of the Österreichisch-ungarische
        > Monarchie, or in English, Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.
        > It was an Austrian Kronland (province)
        > Both German and Czech languages were used.
        >
        > Mähren => Maehren => Marin => Moravia.
        > Mähren was an Austrian Crownland located East of Böhmen
        (Bohemia).
        > Its capital was Brünn (Brno).
        > Mähren had been a separate crownland until 1849 when it became
        a
        part
        > of Böhmen (Bohemia) together with Österreichisch-Schleisen
        > (Austrian-Silesia).
        >
        > Before WW I, Slovakia was part of Upper-Hungary (Felvidék) and
        > part of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy (1867-1918) and earlier the
        > Austrian Empire.
        > Hungarian and Slovak languages were used.
        >
        > The LDS-Mormons has filmed all the parish church records at six
        > of the seven regional Slovak State Archives in Slovakia.
        >
        > These microfilms available through local LDS Family History Centers
        > (FHC) serve as large resource of genealogical information for
        > Americans with surnames from Slovakia.
        >
        > These microfilm reels are available for rental and viewing at any
        > Family History Center (FHC) worldwide.
        > 90% of patrons are non-Mormons doing surname research.
        >
        >
        > But the Czech government never permitted the LDS-Mormons to film the
        > parish church records (tilingual; Latin-Czech-German) in the Czech
        > Republic.
        >
        > (The Austrian Habsburgs, accustomed to being imperial, assumed the
        > title of Emperor of Austria in 1804. Later, the "dual-monarchy" was
        > established, with the Habsburgs as Emperors of Austria and Kings of
        > Hungary, the combined realm being known as "Austria-Hungary")
        >
        > In 1920, a newly-formed country of Czechoslovakia was created from
        the
        > Austrian Crownlands (Bohemia, Moravia and Austrian-Silesia) and a
        > portion of Upper-Hungary (Slovakia and Karpatho-Ukraine).
        >
        > Some families of German ancestry had lived in Czech-Bohemia for many
        > hundreds of years but after WW II they were forced to leave by the
        > " Ausschluss " or Expulsion and return to Germany.
        >
        > The problems between the Germans and Czechs didn't begin until after
        > the Munich Pact in 1938 which sold out Czechoslovakia to Nazi
        Germany.
        > As a result of Munich Pact in 1938, Germany annexed large parts of
        > Bohemia, Moravia, and all of Silesia.
        >
        > On May 5, 1945 the citizens of Praha (Prague) rose in united
        rebellion
        > against the Germans. They also vented their pent-up anger against
        the
        > Sudenten Germans.
        > Of a total of 2.5 million Germans only 200,000 stayed.
        > And the Soviet Army entered Praha on May 9, 1945.
        > Overnight the Germans were driven from their homes with a minimum of
        > personal possessions.
        > 200,000 died as a result of massacre, hunger, exhaustion or suicide.
        > Then the Communist Czechs renamed all the former German named towns
        to
        > multiple Czech names to lose their identities.
        >
        > EIR list only 7 surnames Pokocil but 217 surnames spelled Pospisil.
        >
        > How are you ? English
        >
        > Wie geht es Ihnen ? German
        >
        > Hogy Van ? Hungarian
        >
        > Jak se máte ? Czech
        >
        > Ako sa más^ ? Slovak
        >
        > Pennsylvania Dutch (Pennsilfaani-Deitsch), is a High German
        > language spoken by 150,000 to 250,000 people in North America.
        > The Amish in PA speak Pennsylvania Dutch.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
        > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank
        email to
        > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
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