Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

8867Re: [S-R] terms for family members

Expand Messages
  • William F Brna
    Dec 21, 2003
      "Stryna" is the wife of "Stryc" who is a paternal uncle. She would be an
      aunt on the father's side. Godfather is "Krstnyotec" and godmother is
      "Krstnamat". My parents also used "Kmotor" for godfather, but I do not
      know the distinction, unless it referred to my mother's godfather as
      opposed to mine.

      William F. Brna

      On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 17:00:26 -0000 "marianne50614" <mmpetruska@...>
      writes:
      > Thanks for this string of messages re: terms for grandparents, aunts
      >
      > and uncles. My cousins and I have been curious about the identity
      > of
      > a woman whose identity is listed on the back of her old photo
      > as "Strina". The rest of the description we were unable to read
      > (sadly, my generation didn't learn to read Slovak or Rusyn).
      >
      > Though my cousins and I share at least one great-great-grandfather
      > (GGF), we had all heard different terms for "aunt" or "uncle", and
      > the replies I've seen here have cleared up why they were different.
      >
      > (Our paternal ancestors are related to one another.)
      >
      > Question: How would one refer to their godparents? My mother
      > referred to her godmother as "Nina" and her godfather as "Bacsi"
      > (I'm
      > not sure of the spelling; pronounced "bahch-ee", accent more on
      > first
      > syllable). She wasn't sure if these were actually the terms for
      > godparents or more "terms of endearment" she was taught to use for
      > them.
      >
      > MARIANNE
      >
      >
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Vladimir Bohinc"
      > <konekta@n...>
      > wrote:
      > > Dear Christopher,
      > > It is one of the two possibilities, where I would think, it rather
      >
      > means
      > > brother in law.
      > > But, to be sure, one would have to ask somebody, that is more
      > acquainted
      > > with Rusyn terms of this sort.
      > > Vladimir
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: "christopher gajda" <christophergajda@y...>
      > > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Monday, December 08, 2003 7:19 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members
      > >
      > >
      > > > on photo's from my relatives in Uzhgorod they wrote the
      > word "sovgor" to
      > > identify one man; I thought it might have been a misspelling
      > of "svogor" but
      > > in his funeral pictures there is a wreath that has "shovgor"
      > written in
      > > Cyrillic. Is this some kind of regional variation or is this an
      > entirely
      > > different word?
      > > >
      > > > Vladimir Bohinc <konekta@n...> wrote:Dear Joe,
      > > > Svagor is the brother of my wife.
      > > > Svokor and svokra are her parents.
      > > > We had a joke:
      > > > Show a photo of your svokra in a drug store and you can get any
      >
      > poison
      > > > without prescription.
      > > > They are very understandable people:-)
      > > > Vladimir
      > > >
      > > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > > From: "Armata, Joseph R. (JArmata)" <JArmata@g...>
      > > > To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      > > > Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 3:36 AM
      > > > Subject: Re: [S-R] terms for family members
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > > Kinship terms are really complicated! The old Slavs seemed
      > to
      > > > > have a separate word for every sort of relationship; and the
      > old
      > > > > terms along with imports from German and Hungarian are often
      > used
      > > > > in different ways in different parts of the country.
      > > > >
      > > > > Unfortunately, s~vagor can be either: father-in-law or
      > > > > brother-in-law, depending on local usage. For father-in-law,
      > it
      > > > > traditionally refers to the wife's parents, though it wouldn't
      >
      > be
      > > > > surprising if it were used for the husband's father too
      > > > > somewhere.
      > > > >
      > > > > Tyotka/tetka/tsetka and variations are general terms for
      > aunt.
      > > > >
      > > > > Traditionally, terms based on stri-/stry- refer to uncles and
      > > > > aunts on your father's side, while those with vuj-/uj- refer
      > to
      > > > > uncles and aunts on your mother's side.
      > > > >
      > > > > So striko and strina would be uncle and aunt respectively on
      > the
      > > > > father's side, while vuyko and vuyna would be the same on the
      > > > > mother's side.
      > > > >
      > > > > Joe
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > > Does anyone know the precise relationship for "sovgor"
      > (shovgor)?
      > > Based
      > > > > > on some old photos and letters I had thoght "sovgor" meant
      > > > > > brother-in-law, but recently some Russian exchange students
      >
      > told me
      > > > > > "sovgor" was father-in-law.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Recently someone had wrote about the terms used for various
      >
      > family
      > > > > > members; in letters from Uzhgorod to my grandmother her
      > neices who
      > > grew
      > > > > > up in the Austro-Hungarian and Czechoslovak periods
      > addressed
      > her as
      > > > > > "Tyutka" - but their children who grew up in USSR after WWII
      >
      > addressed
      > > > > > my grandparents as "Strika i Strina". My grandmother
      > sometimes used
      > > a
      > > > > > word which sounded to me like "way-ka" for "uncle".
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
      > > > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank
      >
      > email to
      > > > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > > > >
      > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.557 (20031114) __________
      > > > >
      > > > > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
      > > > > http://www.eset.sk
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
      > > >
      > > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
      > > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank
      > email to
      > > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > > >
      > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
      > Service.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ---------------------------------
      > > > Do you Yahoo!?
      > > > New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
      > > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank
      > email to
      > > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > > >
      > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > __________ Informacia od NOD32 1.573 (20031205) __________
      > > >
      > > > Tato sprava bola preverena antivirusovym systemom NOD32.
      > > > http://www.eset.sk
      > > >
      > > >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
      > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank
      > email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Show all 20 messages in this topic