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34458place of birth, was Re: [S-R] Ship Record

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  • t.salony
    Oct 3, 2012
      Julie,

      Here's a link to Enumerator Instructions:
      http://usa.ipums.org/usa/voliii/tEnumInstr.shtml

      But I think the bigger problem is that we really have no idea how diligent any particular enumerator was, nor how well the informant providing the answers was able to understand the question.

      And still, we don't actually know if the census/manifest/etc. etc. records we call all look at are from the ancestor "jtgen96" asked about.
      ------------------------------------------------------

      jt,

      There could be various bits of information that might lead to your ancestor's passenger manifest, since however you have been looking since 2006 has not lead to success.
      You said " We recently received a nationalization record that givse a
      date of arrival in New York, but still we have not find the record."
      Assuming you mean naturalization record, exactly which have you received, and is it available to see online? Or is the following quote the only "record" you have? It looks like a format used in some index of records.
      INFORMATION:
      NAME: Alexander Kozub
      BIRTH: 14 September 1860 in Hungary
      ARRIVAL: New York 24th November 1887
      DATE OF RECORD: 28 October 18

      Hope you can respond. I, like many here, enjoy the hunt.

      TOM

      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > On Oct 2, 2012, at 7:37 PM, MGMojher wrote:
      >
      > > I looked a the US Censuses from 1900 to 1930, Alexander Kozub gave his immigration year as 1887. Although he did change his nationality to Austrian and birthplace Austria.
      >
      > I would be careful about assuming that Kozub changed his reported nationality, for two reasons. First, those census records do not indicate who the informant was; there's no way to tell if Kozub himself supplied that info, or another family member, or a neighbor. Second, the census takers actually had rules about how to report nationality and birthplace; it's possible that "Austria" was the accurate designation (for US census records) for anywhere in the Austro-Hungarian empire before WW I. One would have to look up the enumerator instructions for the particular census to find out.
      >
      > Julie Michutka
      > jmm@...
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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