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33995Re: [S-R] Re: Ruska Nova Ves

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  • Ben Sorensen
    Aug 5, 2012
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      The Rusyn question is an interesting one- those who identify themselves as such may use either alphabet, speak a dialect as well as the "official" language, and are often Greek Catholic or Orthodox. But the stances on what constitutes being Rusyn is much more stringent in the USA than in Slovakia (oddly enough). There are agendas that are more likely to be pushed in the New Country than in the Old- language, religion, heritage- even though they are still extant in the Old Country. People in the USA are more fervent about it, and are very likely to separate Slovak from Rusyn (but not, for example, Zvolencan from Spisiak). In Slovakia, the identity is more fluid, more grey... for example, in our family, Babka (who is about 95) is considered a Rusynka, but her son is not a Rusyn (because of culture, not because of bloodline). My kids are NOT Rusyn even though the grandparents on my wife's side were both from Rusyn families. That does not make her 1/2
      Rusyn.... but in the USA, people would argue that it does. But all Rusyns in Slovakia are Slovak.

      The truth is that understanding the nuance of cultural identity is not going to be accurate here in the USA. We have preconceived notions about this aspect of life; Slovaks do as well, but the notions do not fit well here. 

      Some people hear Spis, and think it is Rusyn. Rusyns from one area were different in culture from those in another area. In short, to get a handle on this issue, I am of the opinion that one has to travel there and come to an understanding first-hand.

      Ben


      ________________________________
      From: AnnieW <annduardo@...>
      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 10:48 AM
      Subject: [S-R] Re: Ruska Nova Ves


       

      I keep getting different answers. My husbands grandfathers side were Rusyns from now Poland and they erred on the side of calling themselves Russian. To me it seems there must have been a mutual intelligibility between the far eastern Slovak dialects and that spoken by the Carpatho Rusyns but I have been also told they are two totally different languages and groups. I know Rusyns probably more so from Galicia used the Cyrillic alphabet but I heard recently from someone on hear I believe their Rusyn ancestor used the roman alphabet.
      In any case they are an interesting group of people!
      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Philip Baer <PHILBAER@...> wrote:
      >
      > To my understanding, Rusyns were Slovak. My ancestors were also from RNV and were GK but some married RK women and seem to have changed religions. The LDS records have "mixed marriages" and some indicated as "conversions". It seems that this was not uncommon. Comments?
      > Philip (Medvecz) Baer
      >
      > Sent from my iPhone
      >
      > On Aug 5, 2012, at 9:08 AM, "AnnieW" <annduardo@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I'm getting a little confused... My husbands Ivanko/Kmetz family in Yonkers attended a roman catholic Slovak church and was always told his grandmother spoke slovak and prided on being Slovak. In fact im told the Slovak family didnt even like his GReek Catholic Rusyn Grandfathers family, his Gma married a Rusyn from the former Galicia. But now that I found his "Slovak" families birth records and ancestral village Ruska Nova Ves this Saros region had a lot of Rusyns in it and the birth records and 1869 Slovakia census says the family was Greek Catholic hich is an indicator of being Rusyn....
      > >
      > > The Ivankos, Petruskas and Desatniks (all decendants) all say Greek Catholic. The Janos Kmecz/Kmetz the Petruskas GGma married says was Roman Catholic from Kokosovce according to that census. Perhaps all those lines were Rusyn and the Kmetz line is Slovak? It just blows my mind that they may be Rusyn at all, it just contradicts everything that was told about his grandma being Slovak and she herself calling herself Slovak...
      > >
      > > all though it does make more sense than as to how my mother in law says her parents would speak a different language to one another, she never knew what they were speaking. She was brought up believing they were Russian since her father attended the Russian orthodox church. But I have since discovered they were Rusyns from now Gorlice county.
      > >
      > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Paul Sabol <pgsabol@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I can't speak in generalities, but I can say my Sabol and Sabolcik ancestors from RNV were Rusyn and attended the Greek Catholic churches here when they got to America.
      > > >
      > > > Â
      > > > Regards,
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Paul G. Sabol
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > "Pain or damage don’t end the world, or despair or beatings. The world ends when you’re dead. Until then, you got more punishment in store. Stand it like a manâ€"and give some back." - Al Swearingen
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ________________________________
      > > > From: AnnieW <annduardo@>
      > > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 3:05 AM
      > > > Subject: [S-R] Ruska Nova Ves
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Â
      > > > Does anyone know off hand how heavily of an influence the Rusyns had in this area? Is Greek Catholic an indicator of this?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




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