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23099Re: [S-R] Names: Man's name change Vaclav to James

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  • Ron Matviyak
    Aug 3, 2009
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      Just a quick addition to Ben's comment to recognize a potential point of confusion: Joschka is also a German first name, diminutive (as in Johnny), but does not change case as in the Slovak Joska. Of course spelling may vary by personal choice, adding to the confusion.

      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hey there Mike et al...
      > Just a quick correction. "Joska" is an objective case of the name. While I am avoiding walking down the magical path of Slovak grammar, the nominative- and therefore the good case to use in English, is Josko. To je Josko- This is Josko. To je pre Joska- This is for Josko.
      > Just to be a little help...
      > Ben
      >
      > --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Michael Mojher <mgmojher@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Michael Mojher <mgmojher@...>
      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Names: Man's name change Vaclav to James
      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 3:13 PM
      >
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      >
      > Tom,
      > Joska is the diminutive of Jozsef. The equivalent to our Joey.
      >
      > From: Tom Geiss
      > Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 11:39 AM
      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@ yahoogroups. com
      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Names: Man's name change Vaclav to James
      >
      > Just like my grand mother's brother's name is JOZSEF. and my American relatives hear it pronounced, then write his name JOSKA. The evolution of names.
      > Tom
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Michael Mojher
      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 1:03 PM
      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Names: Man's name change Vaclav to James
      >
      > Joe,
      > In the Rootsweb's English Versions of Foreign Names Jakub's English version is Jacob. Under James Czech and Slovak blocks are left blank, indicating that there is no equivalent name for James in those languages.
      >
      > From: Armata, Joseph R
      > Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 8:38 AM
      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@ yahoogroups. com
      > Subject: RE: [S-R] Names: Man's name change Vaclav to James
      >
      > James is Jakub in Czech, coming from Hebrew meaning to take by the heel.
      >
      > Vaclav is a native Slavic name, coming from roots meaning greater glory.
      >
      > So the names are completely unrelated. Your Vaclav probably just picked the name James to go by. Think of all the Chinese university students who come to America today and pick an arbitrary English name to use.
      >
      > Joe
      >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:SLOVAK-
      > > ROOTS@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Janet Kozlay
      > > Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 9:25 AM
      > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@ yahoogroups. com
      > > Subject: RE: [S-R] Names: Man's name change Vaclav to James
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > My argument would have held more weight had I found that
      > > Vaclav/Wenceslaus
      > > and James had the same feast day, but, alas, they do not.
      > >
      > > On the other hand, going back further, the name James has its origins
      > > in the
      > > Hebrew name Jakov/Jaakov. Could Jakov and Vaclav in turn be related?
      > >
      > > How are the names of Jesus' disciples named in a Czech Bible?
      > >
      > > Janet
      > >
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