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1737Re: Questions

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  • Frank Kurchina
    Jun 7, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, "Kathleen Duvall" <nanwkshp@a...>
      wrote:
      > > I'm very new to all of this, but I noticed you are in Florida. I
      live just
      > > south of Pittsburgh, and I'd be more than happy to help you with
      anything I
      > > can from here. You all have been so helpful already (and I've
      only been on
      > > this group since this morning!), so just ask if you need a
      Pittsburgh
      > > connection! Anita B.>
      >
      > Which makes me think -- there seemed to be a large Hungarian
      > population in Pittsburgh. I wonder why there? Was it because some
      > Hungarians arrived there and "sponsored" others?
      >
      > Which also brings me to another question. I found my great-uncles
      in
      > the Social Security death index and got copies of their Social
      Security
      > card applications, but since I couldn't find my grandmother, I
      assumed
      > she had never gotten a Social Security card. I had heard that
      women
      > were not required to be naturalized? She did domestic and waitress
      > work, and I thought maybe she just never got into the system.
      >
      > I was also wondering if such a thing as a "green card" existed back
      > then (1911 and on)?
      >
      > I remember my grandmother telling me she couldn't vote because she
      > wasn't a citizen. But when I got her death certificate, I see she
      did have
      > a social security number! Is there anywhere else I could use that
      social
      > security number to find out more information about her?
      >
      > Thanks so much!
      >
      > Kathleen in Florida
      > researching GALEK, HUTZMAN

      Was GM maiden name Galek or Hutzman ?
      5 surname Hutzman listed are all MI.

      http://ssdi.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?f3=Hutzman&f4=&f0=&f1=&f2=&f2
      0=&advqt=%2Fsearch%2Frectype%2Fvital%2Fssdi%2Fmain.htm&db=ssdi&submit4
      23=Search&f13=&f15=&f14=&f12=&f9=&f8=&f10=&f6=&f5=&f7=

      59 surname Galek are listed in SSDI.

      http://ssdi.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?f3=Galek&f4=&f0=&f1=&f2=&f20=
      &advqt=%2Fsearch%2Frectype%2Fvital%2Fssdi%2Fmain.htm&db=ssdi&submit423
      =Search&f13=&f15=&f14=&f12=&f9=&f8=&f10=&f6=&f5=&f7=

      Social Security began in 1937.
      If not liated in Index and surname had a number , then nobody ever
      applied for her death benefit payments.

      You Request Information for surname from the Social Security Death
      Index.
      The letter comes preprinted with appropriate information already
      entered from the SSDI information.
      The copy of SS application form SS-5 lists surname village/town of
      origin, parent's names, and mother's maiden name.

      Naturalization papers came in four flavors :

      =>
      1.Certificate of Arrival
      (this document, issued from 1906 on, provided the information
      about the arrival date and ship. It provided proof that the
      individual came on that date and the document was issued at the
      port of entry upon arrival)


      2.Declaration of Intention
      (name, age, occupation, personal description, date and place
      of birth, wife's name and her place of birth, present and last
      foreign address, vessel or ship sailed on and from what port of
      embarkation, port of arrival and date, signature)

      3.Petition for Naturalization
      (data listed in 2. above plus marital status, children's name, and
      names of two witnesses)

      4.Record / Certificate of Naturalization
      (this was the document which granted citizenship. Contains some
      items but not the details above). It was meant to be a sort of
      souvenir of the official proceedings ( like a high school diploma).

      Any woman, between 1855-1922, automatically became a citizen when
      her husband was naturalized. Children under age of 16 as well,
      if between age 16-21 when immigrated to U.S. children were required
      to wait until after 21st birthday.
      Wives after 1922 had to apply for their own naturalization.

      Pittsburgh had a large Slovak, Polish, Croatian; so maybe a large
      Hungarian immigrant population as well ?
      Pittsburgh had many steel mills and coal mines in the region.
      Plus immigrants tend to settle where their relatives and/or sponsors
      were already living.

      No green cards back then.
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