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11256[S-R] Re: a town

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  • Frank
    Dec 4, 2004
      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Jeanann Jameson
      <jjeanann2000@y...> wrote:
      > hi ron, thanks for getting back to me. i was hoping it
      > meant a town. the only town my mother remembers my
      > grandmother speaking is and excuse the spelling
      > Lacarac and Mitcovit and i believe bill once told me
      > those towns were what is now near belgrade. my
      > grandparents spoke german, hungarian, polish, and
      > slovick they were catholic so i'm still in the dark
      > about everything. but thanks for getting back to me.
      > maybe back then it was all called austria. thanks
      > again jean

      Jean
      hi
      tag (G)
      czesc (P)
      ahoj (Sk)
      zdravo (Cr)

      Sremská Mitrovica (Croatian)
      Mitróvicza (Hungarian)
      Mitrowitz (German)
      Sirmium (Latin)

      Sremská Mitrovica was a stop located on the Danube and Sava rivers on
      the mission of brothers Cyril and Methodius to convert Greater
      Moravia to Christianity in 863 AD.
      Supposedly the Slovaks, Czechs, and Carpatho-Rusyns were already
      established in Greater Moravia.

      Sremská Mitrovica is located in Serbia today, but it was located in
      Slavonia before WW I in Szerém megye (county), Hungary.
      Syrmia (E)
      Srem (Cr)
      Syrmien (G)

      Was your GM's husband a Andreas Rak ?
      What about a Andrea Rak, age 28, Hungarian-Croatian, married, who had
      emigrated in 1906 via port of Trieste to his brother-in-law in
      Steelton,PA.
      Andrea's Last Residence was Lacarak, i.e., Lac'arak (Srbija)

      Andrew (E)
      Andreas (G) (L)
      András (H)
      Andrea (I)
      Andreja (Cr)

      Steelton PA
      When the steel mill was erected, the stretch of land was named Steel
      City; that name eventually evolved into the proper title, Steelton.:
      "tons of steel."
      Before the works were built in 1866, the undeveloped land housed only
      six families.
      In the heyday of the steel industry, it was had over 16,000 residents,
      representing 33 different ethnic groups. With increasing
      deindustrialization and the closing down of many of the steel mill 's
      operations, the population declined to 5,162 people.

      v
      Frank Kurcina


      > --- amiak27 <rmat@p...> wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > Jean,
      > >
      > > I am sorry to be the one to disappoint you, but my
      > > immediate guess is
      > > that "Estrarich" is really "Österreich", which is
      > > what the Austrians
      > > call their own country, Austria. This can also be
      > > spelled "Oesterreich".
      > >
      > > So you have not narrowed it down to a village, but
      > > just the country.
      > > This can still include Austria, or Austrian Galicia
      > > which is now part
      > > of Poland & Ukraine. By some careless uses it can
      > > also be meant to
      > > include Hungary or Slovakia.
      > >
      > > To make sure, look up Jewish gen on the web and try
      > > their
      > > stettleseeker, which works phonetically.
      > >
      > > Good luck. Do you have any other hints, or even
      > > words that might
      > > give us a hint as to which dialect they spoke?
      > >
      > > Ron
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "jjeanann2000"
      > > <jjeanann2000@y...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi i just found out that my grandmother may have
      > > come from a town
      > > or
      > > > village by a name that sounds like Estrarich in
      > > Austria. Any help
      > > > would be great. thanks Jean
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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