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Talk this Friday at UC Berkeley: "How We Can Have Safe, Convenient, Affordable, Pleasant Transportation Without Making People Drive Less or Give Up Suburban Living"

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  • asha.weinstein@sjsu.edu
    ... January 23, 2004 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. in 240 Bechtel Center Join us from 3:30-4pm in the ITS Library for cookie hour! Dr. Research Scientist Institute of
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 22, 2004
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      ----- Forwarded by Asha Weinstein/SJSU on 01/22/2004 10:22 AM -----

      January 23, 2004



      4:00 to 5:00 p.m. in 240 Bechtel Center



      Join us from 3:30-4pm in the ITS Library for cookie hour!



      Dr.



      Research Scientist

      Institute of Transportation Studies

      University of California, Davis



      "How We Can Have Safe, Convenient, Affordable, Pleasant Transportation
      Without Making People Drive Less or Give Up Suburban Living"



      My transportation colleagues and I at ITS - UC Davis have developed an
      idea for a new town plan and transportation system that, as we claim
      rather grandiosely in the title of a research report, can make
      transportation safe, environmentally benign, pleasant, and convenient
      without having people give up automobile driving or suburban living.



      In our view there is a great deal of evidence that any transportation
      plans that require people to significantly reduce driving or give up
      suburban living are not likely to succeed at large scales in the USA. We
      also believe that so-called efficient pricing and similar economic
      instruments are not likely to materially affect transportation problems.
      Therefore, our strategy is not to focus on reducing automobile use, but rather to develop a new town
      plan and transportation system that can dramatically mitigate a wide range
      of transportation-related problems while accommodating demand for auto
      mobility and single-family living. The basic idea behind this plan is to
      completely segregate vehicle use according to the kinetic energy of the
      vehicles, because kinetic energy turns out to be an excellent proxy for
      most of the negative effects of transportation: death and injury from
      crashes, excessive energy use, environmental pollution, expensive and ugly
      infrastructure, and so on. Specifically, we propose to have two completely
      separate infrastructures, one for fast and heavy vehicles, and the other
      for lightweight and low-speed modes. We have designed an entire town plan
      and transportation system that realizes this.



      The major elements of our idea have transportation and planning
      antecedents. For example, our dual-transportation infrastructure can be
      viewed in part as an extensive elaboration of "garden city" plans (e.g.,
      Radburn, New Jersey; Davis, California; and Welwyn, England), and our
      recognition of the benefits of reducing the kinetic energy of travel has
      been anticipated by Bill Garrison (of U.C. Berkeley) and others. We were
      inspired by these ideas to develop a new transportation system on a
      city-wide scale. In this talk I elaborate on the development, details, and
      impacts of this plan. (A research report, referenced below, provides
      details.)



      Reference:

      M. A. Delucchi, K. Kurani, K. Nesbitt, and T. Turrentine, How We Can Have Safe, Convenient, Affordable, Pleasant Transportation
      Without Making People Drive Less or Give Up Suburban Living, UCD-ITS-RR-02-08, Institute of Transportation Studies, University of
      California, Davis, September (2002).



      The report can be downloaded from www.its.ucdavis.edu/faculty/delucchi.htm.
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