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Seminar w/Julia Griswold: "Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems" (UC Berkeley, 4/19)

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  • Asha Weinstein Agrawal
    ... From: ITS at UC Berkeley Date: Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 1:37 PM Subject: [ITS] Friday Seminar - April 19th - Julia Griswold-
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 15, 2013
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      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      From: ITS at UC Berkeley <its.fridayseminar@...>
      Date: Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 1:37 PM
      Subject: [ITS] Friday Seminar - April 19th - Julia Griswold- Tradeoffs
      between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban
      Transit Systems

      * ITS Friday Transportation Seminar Series *

      Friday, April 19th 2013

      4 - 5 p.m. in 502 Davis Hall, UC Berkeley

      Julia B. Griswold
      Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley

      Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of
      Urban Transit Systems

      Abstract: Public transit is often touted as a �green� transportation
      option and a way for users to reduce their environmental footprint by
      avoiding automobile emissions. Many transit systems, however, have
      considerable emissions, and when vehicles run with ridership
      significantly below capacity, the per-passenger-kilometer emissions
      can be greater than for automobile. Efforts to reduce public transit
      emissions have centered on shifting users from more polluting modes
      and improving technology either by retrofitting existing vehicles or
      replacing them with more efficient models. I explore an approach to
      optimizing the design and operations of transit systems for both costs
      and emissions, using continuum approximation models. The research
      identifies the Pareto frontier for designing an idealized transit
      network, and compares transit modes over four city scenarios. Further,
      I explore how the level of service for users impacts emissions: first,
      comparing modes at a given emissions level to see which provides the
      best service to users, in terms of average travel time; second,
      incorporating travel time elasticities into the optimization to allow
      demand to reduce subject to increases in the travel time. In general,
      the lowest-cost mode will provide the fastest travel time to users at
      a given emissions level. When we account for shifting demand,
      emissions reductions are moderated, but not eliminated, for relatively
      inelastic users. The approaches described could be used to optimize
      the network design of existing bus service or help to select a mode
      and design attributes for a new transit system.

      Bio: Before coming to UC Berkeley, Julia Griswold earned a B.A. in
      Linguistics from Pomona College and an M.A. in Geography from San
      Francisco State University. For her master�s thesis, she developed an
      intersection-level model of pedestrian volume for the city of San
      Francisco. After working in the field of Geographic Information
      Systems for a few years, she enrolled at UC Berkeley and completed her
      M.S. in Civil & Environmental Engineering in 2010. She is currently a
      Ph.D. candidate in the same field.

      Please join us for a TRANSOC-sponsored Cookie Hour in the ITS Library
      at 3:30 PM.

      Organized by the Transportation Students Organizing Committee
      (TRANSOC) and partially funded by ITS Berkeley


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