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Mobility-impaired woman enjoys her Segway scooter

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  • irvin dawid
    (Only $5,000!) Published Wednesday, May 7, 2003, in the Menlo Park Almanac Segwaying through West Menlo By Andrea Gemmet Almanac Staff Writer For West Menlo
    Message 1 of 1 , May 8, 2003
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      (Only $5,000!)

      Published Wednesday, May 7, 2003, in the Menlo Park Almanac

      Segwaying through West Menlo

      By Andrea Gemmet
      Almanac Staff Writer

      For West Menlo Park resident Timi Most, going from her house to the
      Almanac offices is just a quick glide along the Alameda on her new
      Segway Human Transporter.

      The distinctive two-wheeled contraption, which sells for slightly
      under $5,000 on Amazon.com, isn't just a trendy toy for Ms. Most.

      "I have mobility issues," stemming from a serious spinal cord injury
      suffered 35 years ago, she says. "I walk really slowly, and I wanted
      to be able to go on trails and up to the mountains with my family."

      Although she has owned the Segway for less than a month, she's
      already used it to participate in hikes in the Stanford Hills and
      along the Crystal Springs Reservoir, as well as to take her son to
      the Sharon Heights duck pond and to pop over to the Plantation Cafe
      for coffee, she says. Even though San Francisco is one of the few
      municipalities to ban the Segway from its streets, Ms. Most plans to
      ride hers across the Golden Gate Bridge.

      "Hopefully I won't get arrested," she jokes.

      A self-balancing device that relies on computers and gyroscopic
      sensors to stay upright, the Segway responds to slight changes in
      body position to go forward, backwards and stop. Twisting the grip
      on the handlebar turns the Segway, which can execute a complete, 360-
      degree revolution in place. Ms. Most attended a company-sponsored
      training session, which she said was helpful but not really
      necessary.

      "It's really intuitive," she says.

      To prove her point, she offered rides to a half-dozen Almanac
      staffers, all of whom got the hang of riding the Segway in a minute
      or less.

      Ms. Most says she's a firm believer in the environmental benefits of
      the Segway, as well. The Segway's battery uses only about 10 cents
      worth of electricity to recharge, which lasts for about 15 miles,
      depending on the terrain, she says. Using a Segway instead of a car
      can reduce pollution from gas emissions, she says.

      Plus, it's just plain fun. Her two sons love it, she says, and her
      10-year-old is especially adept.

      "He flies around like Harry Potter," Ms. Most says.





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