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Environmental Justice Lecture: Lessons from Smeltertown: Public Health, Lead Contamination and Collective Memory on the US/Mexico Border

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  • Dayana Salazar
    Dear SJSU urban planning students and friends, Please see below my signature an announcement for a talk on Environmental Justice issues along the US-Mexico
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 3, 2011
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      Dear SJSU urban planning students and friends,



      Please see below my signature an announcement for a talk on Environmental
      Justice issues along the US-Mexico border.



      Best wishes,



      Dayana



      Dayana Salazar



      Chair and Professor

      Urban and Regional Planning Department

      San Jose State University

      www.sjsu.edu/urbanplanning



      dayana.salazar@...

      (408) 924-5854







      *** Please circulate widely **
      *
      The Division for Interdisciplinary Race and Gender Studies (DIRGS) and
      Department of Mexican American Studies proudly present:

      *Lessons from Smeltertown:
      Public Health, Lead Contamination and
      Collective Memory on the US/Mexico Border
      *
      *A Talk by Historian Monica Perales

      Thursday, 2/17 � 12:00 � 1:00pm
      MLK Library, Room 255-257
      *

      In 1970, officials investigating the air pollution emanating from the
      American Smelting and Refining Company smokestacks in El Paso, Texas made an
      alarming discovery. More than one hundred children in the neighboring
      working class barrio of Smeltertown had seriously elevated levels of lead in
      their bloodstreams. Despite the evidence of widespread contamination,
      Mexican American "Esmeltianos" (many of whom were descendants of pioneers
      who had built the community in the shadows of the smelter nearly a century
      before) fought efforts to demolish their homes and beloved community. This
      talk explores the complex responses to the lead crisis and the
      interconnections between the border city�s historic health policies, postwar
      urban renewal efforts, the legacy of the smelting industry and a community�s
      collective memory in informing responses to the environmental crisis.


      *About the speaker:
      *Dr. Monica Perales is the author of *Smeltertown: Making and Remembering a
      Southwest Border Community* (University of North Carolina Press, 2010). She
      is a professor of history at the University of Houston, where she teaches
      courses in Chicana/o labor and social history, immigration, the American
      West, Borderlands and oral history. She holds a B.A. in Journalism (1994)
      and M.A. in History (1996) from the University of Texas at El Paso, and
      received her Ph.D. in history from Stanford University (2004). She has been
      the recipient of various fellowships and was the 2006-2007 Summerlee Fellow
      in Texas History at the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at
      Southern Methodist University.


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