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Interested in Bay Area transportation planning? Join BATN!

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  • asha.weinstein@sjsu.edu
    Greetings, MURPs members - Those of you interested in transportation issues in the Bay Area may wish to join an email list group called San Francisco Bay Area
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 6, 2005
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      Greetings, MURPs members -

      Those of you interested in transportation issues in the Bay Area may wish to join an email list group called "San Francisco Bay Area Transportation News," or BATN.   This is an amazing collection of newspaper articles, as well as magazine articles and an occasional press release, on every aspect of Bay Area transportation issues.  In the last week, for example, 95 items have been distributed.  But don't be afraid of overwhelming your in-box.  I suggest you sign up for the "digest version," which comes a few times a week and begins with a handy index of the articles, so you can skim to see if there is anything interesting to you.  I'm forwarding the latest issue in this message, so you can see what it's like.

      For those of you not particularly interested in transportation planning, you might still find the list interesting, as there are a number of issues on topics like smart growth and environmental planning that only touch on transportation tangentially.

      To subscribe, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BATN/ and click on "Join This Group."

      Best regards,

      Asha Weinstein

      Assistant Professor
      Department of Urban and Regional Planning
      San José State University
      One Washington Square
      San Jose, CA 95192-0185
      email: asha.weinstein@...
      phone: 408-924-5853
      web page: http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/weinstein/


      ----- Forwarded by Asha Weinstein/SJSU on 09/06/2005 10:04 PM -----
      BATN@yahoogroups.com

      09/05/2005 11:13 AM

      Please respond to
      BATN-owner@yahoogroups.com

      To
      BATN@yahoogroups.com
      cc
      Subject
      [BATN] Digest Number 1674





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      There are 25 messages in this issue.

      Topics in this digest:

           1. Column: I hate bicylists, bike lanes, HOV, and more
                From: "8/26 Antioch Ledger" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
           2. Santa Cruz Metro mediation talks fizzle
                From: "8/30 Santa Cruz Sentinel" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
           3. Santa Cruz bus riders brace for strike
                From: "8/31 Santa Cruz Sentinel" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
           4. Santa Cruz Metro drivers delay strike
                From: "9/1 Santa Cruz Sentinel" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
           5. Santa Cruz RTC head quits, heads for France, glass work
                From: "9/2 Santa Cruz Sentinel" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
           6. Car sharing
                From: "8/31 SJ Metro" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
           7. Larger traffic lights coming to Fairfield's Travis Boulevard
                From: "9/3 Fairfield Republic" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
           8. AC Transit fares increase
                From: "9/4 Oakland Tribune" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
           9. Bill banning GG Bridge from tolling peds, bikes moves ahead
                From: "9/4 Marin IJ" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          10. Bay Bridge ramp construction, ramp closure
                From: "9/4 Contra Costa Times" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          11. Katrina's shock to the oil system
                From: "9/4 New York Times" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          12. Environmental groups challenge Tuck appointment to Air Board
                From: "8/30 Associated Press" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          13. Editorial: Cindy Tuck a dismal pick to chair CARB
                From: "8/31 SF Chronicle" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          14. Editorial: Senate should fear Arnold, approve polluter Tuck
                From: "8/31 SJ Mercury" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          15. Senate committee opposes Arnold's air board chair nominee
                From: "9/1 Los Angeles Times" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          16. Senate committee rejects Schwarzenegger's CARB nominee
                From: "9/1 Associated Press" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          17. Senate committee rejects polluter lobbyist Tuck for CARB post
                From: "9/1 SF Chronicle" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          18. Senate rejects pollution lobbyist Tuck for Air Board chair
                From: "9/2 Los Angeles Times" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          19. New SF Octavia Boulevard to open on Friday
                From: "9/5 SF Examiner" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          20. Bill allows impounding of Sacramento County drunks' cars
                From: "9/3 Sacramento Bee" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          21. CA gets squeezed by Gulf (of Mexico, that is) gas shortage
                From: "9/3 Sacramento Bee" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          22. Some aren't happy with new Octavia freeway ramp
                From: "9/5 SF Examiner" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          23. State senate to vote on bike/ped bridge toll ban
                From: "9/5 SF Examiner" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          24. Demolition of old Carquinez span to start in November
                From: "9/5 Fairfield Republic" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
          25. Fremont-Union City Hwy 84 saga continues
                From: "9/5 Fremont Argus" <batn@yahoogroups.com>


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      Message: 1        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 12:46:33 -0700
        From: "8/26 Antioch Ledger" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Column: I hate bicylists, bike lanes, HOV, and more

      Published Friday, August 26, 2005, in the Antioch Ledger-Dispatch

      Why are we spending so much for biking?

      By Barbara Zivica

      About 40,000 people regularly commute by bicycle to San Francisco,
      according to the Bike Coalition.  The city has the highest ridership
      for U.S. cities of its size and is the only county in California in
      which bike ridership has increased.

      Bike events such as San Francisco's 2005 Bike to Work Day, which only
      attracted about 2,000 participants, are fun, but the state and the Bay
      Area spend far too much money to accommodate the few who ride bikes.

      Admittedly, bike riding is an inexpensive means of commuting if you
      live in an area where the weather is favorable, but not a viable
      commuter option for the majority of us.

      Why, therefore, are our legislators spending millions of dollars on
      bike lanes, when the Bay Area ranks in the top 10 worst metro areas
      when it comes to critical transportation infrastructure needs?

      Are you aware that under existing law the state transfers $600,000
      monthly from the Highway Users Tax Account to the Bicycle
      Transportation Account?

      Under the law, which state Sen. Tom Torlakson seeks to amend (SB523),
      that amount is supposed to be reduced to $416,667 as of June 30, 2006.
      Other funds are going to Bay Area bike and pedestrian trails, too.

      The Metropolitan Transportation Commission's Regional Measure 2
      allocated $20 million for projects that reduce congestion on one or
      more state toll bridges by facilitating walking or bicycling.

      Initial estimates in 2000 for a bike lane on the eastern span of the
      Bay Bridge to Yerba Buena Island were $50 million, another $100
      million to add one to the western span.

      Additionally, under AB748, which is pending, no tolls will be imposed
      on those using a pedestrian or bike over any toll facility.

      Bay Bridge bike riders didn't use the trans-bay shuttle that was
      provided and aren't using BART to cross, although I'm sure the rail
      system would appreciate the additional ridership.

      Measure J, the Contra Costa Transportation Authority's sales tax
      expenditure plan, allocated $30.8 million for pedestrian, bike, and
      trail facilities plus additional funds under Commute Alternatives,
      Safe Transportation for Children, and Livable Communities Project
      grants.

      Contra Costa County's Redevelopment Agency, responsible for the
      county's first transit village at the Pleasant Hill BART station, has
      given the go ahead for construction of a $675,000 bicycle and
      pedestrian shortcut along the BART right of way.

      It also OK'd $7 million for a bridge across Treat Boulevard to
      increase pedestrian and bike access volume to BART which just decided
      to cut direct service to the airport on the Pittsburg/Bay Point line.

      Although bike lanes are touted to "make streets safe" and "encourage
      bicycle use," these statements are not substantiated by research or
      data.

      In fact, in this era of declining bike sales and usage, it has now
      begun to be recognized that not only do bike lanes have no measured
      effect on increasing cyclists' safety they might be increasing
      conflicts and collisions between cyclists and motorists, especially at
      intersections.

      Even traffic authorities in bike-friendly Europe are becoming aware of
      increased conflicts caused by the installation of bike lanes.

      As for HOV lanes and the MTC deciding to allocate up to $4 million to
      fund free Spare the Air Day rides, which haven't helped BART gain
      ridership, don't get me started!





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      Message: 2        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 11:54:18 -0700
        From: "8/30 Santa Cruz Sentinel" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Santa Cruz Metro mediation talks fizzle

      Published Tuesday, August 30, 2005, in the Santa Cruz Sentinel

      Metro talks fizzle
      Mediation fails to yield accord

      By Genevieve Bookwalter

      SANTA CRUZ -- Bus drivers and transit agency negotiators failed to reach an
      agreement Monday during the first of two 11th-hour mediation sessions
      called in an effort to stave off Thursday's planned strike.

      Meanwhile, service was slashed about 30 percent as drivers refused to
      work overtime, and Monterey-Salinas Transit picked a new Watsonville
      bus stop should Santa Cruz County drivers walk off the job.

      A state mediator called Monday's meeting between Santa Cruz
      Metropolitan Transit District and United Transportation Union Local 23
      negotiators after drivers announced Friday they would walk off the job
      Sept. 1.

      Both sides were told not to discuss the session, which lasted about
      three hours.

      "All we can say is there was a mediation session held today and
      another one is scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 31, at 4 p.m.," said
      driver and union spokeswoman Bonnie Morr.

      But Metro General Manager Les White said he's not optimistic about
      reaching a deal.

      "It's looking more and more like Thursday's it," White said.  "I wish
      it wasn't so, but that seems to be it."
             
      The decision to strike came after mediation broke down last week.
      Drivers responded Thursday to Metro's "last, best and final" offer
      with a proposal more costly what the agency suggested.

      The biggest issue is how much money the district can spend on its
      drivers -- specifically for health care.

      Trained bus operators start earning about $34,000 a year and move up
      to more than $51,000 in six years.  Drivers did not ask for a pay
      raise.

      Instead, negotiators requested assistance with health care costs, as
      those needing family coverage pay $413.90 a month for medical
      insurance.

      Metro officials offered to cut family costs down to $106.72 a month
      after Jan. 1, and coverage for couples from $172.92 to $82.09.  Single
      employees would pay $41.05 a month, up from not paying anything.

      Until Jan. 1, rates would be an average of $6 more in each of the
      categories.

      To help cover the savings, union members agreed to give up a week of
      paid time for new parents; a safety bonus for drivers with clean
      records; optional four-day work weeks; and extra pay for bilingual
      employees, but only when they are on leave.

      But drivers refuse to give up an optional month of general leave, a
      program that lets union members sign up for a month off without pay
      but with benefits.

      Drivers argue that without general leave, they can't get two weeks off
      at a time.  Because buses run almost every day of the year, it's hard
      to get vacation days off in a row.

      To keep general leave and stay within Metro's budget, the district
      maintains, drivers could pay more in health care costs by about $20
      more per month per person insured than originally proposed.

      Bus drivers also want Metro to pay more into retirement.  But that
      could draw objections from Metro's other employee union, Service
      Employee International Union Local 415, which covers about 100
      mechanics, supervisors and administrative staff.  Those negotiators
      ratified a one-year contract Thursday.

      Traditionally, Metro spends the same amount per person on employees in
      both unions, said Metro's White.  If the agency spends more on
      drivers, SEIU negotiators could return in 2006 asking for
      reimbursement equal to what bus drivers received.

      Drivers also eye unexpected sales tax revenue coming into the district
      to help pay for more expensive contracts.  But Metro officials argue
      that money should go toward paying down a $1.4 million deficit.

      In the meantime, drivers have continued refusing to work overtime, a
      practice that forced dispatchers Monday to cut 30 percent of service
      by shaving trips off various routes.

      Monterey-Salinas Transit has announced if Santa Cruz County drivers
      strike, passengers heading south from Watsonville should grab the bus
      on the corner of Beach and Union streets instead of the city's transit
      center.


      Contact Genevieve Bookwalter at gbookwalter@...





      ________________________________________________________________________
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      Message: 3        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 11:59:16 -0700
        From: "8/31 Santa Cruz Sentinel" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Santa Cruz bus riders brace for strike

      Published Wednesday, August 31, 2005, in the Santa Cruz Sentinel

      Bus riders brace for Thursday strike

      By Genevieve Bookwalter

      It's the first week of classes at Cabrillo College in Aptos, and on a
      warm afternoon the Soquel Avenue bus stop teems with students.  Some
      chill with their iPods, others chat with friends and still others just
      stare at the sky.

      In 24 hours, the spot might be deserted.

      Drivers for the Santa Cruz Metropolitan Transit District have
      threatened to strike Thursday, leaving many of the community college's
      almost 12,000 students on two campuses without a ride to school.

      "It really stinks.  I'm screwed on Thursday," said Jen Dix, 17, as she
      waited for the bus to Santa Cruz and then home to Boulder Creek.

      To get to class, "I'm going to have to bother my dad at work," Dix
      said.

      Drivers with United Transportation Union Local 23 have threatened to
      strike over medical insurance premium costs and other benefits the
      district says it can no longer afford.

      A session with both sides and a state mediator is scheduled for 4 p.m.
      today, but drivers have already started preparing for picket lines.

      Should the drivers walk, it would shut down 40 routes and leave more
      than 12,000 people looking for a new ride.  Factor in Cabrillo College
      and UC Santa Cruz students who use Metro, and the number of riders
      affected swells to about 23,000.  UCSC's fall quarter begins Sept. 17.

      Service has already been cut between 10 and 30 percent for the past
      week-and-a-half, as drivers refuse to work overtime to protest souring
      contract negotiations.  Metro dispatchers have shaved trips on various
      routes throughout the county.

      That left some riders angry and unsupportive of the drivers.

      "I was late yesterday to class by 40 minutes," said Heather Herring,
      18, of Santa Cruz.  Her bus just didn't show up.

      "If they're not reliable, not many people are going to ride the
      buses," she said.

      Herring said she might just start driving, even though car insurance
      costs much more than a monthly pass.

      For students who can't find a ride, Cabrillo spokeswoman Cathy Summa
      said the college has started a car pool board in the cafeteria and is
      trying to get the word out to students.

      "I'd say that we have plenty of parking," Summa said, noting Twin
      Lakes Church would accommodate overflow if necessary.

      Christian Ramos, 19, said a teacher told his class to visit the county
      Web site, <http://www.commutesolutions.org>, to help residents find
      car pools or bicycle buddies.

      "Until then I'll have to find a car, skateboard if I have to," Ramos
      said.  Or, he might walk from his home in Capitola.

      Lisa Morales, 18, of Watsonville is still wondering how she will get
      to school.

      Morales studies Web media at the Aptos campus.  She doesn't own a car,
      and would have to stay home in Las Lomas if the buses don't run.

      "My parents work in the fields all day," she said, "so they can't give
      me a ride.  These buses are my only form of transportation, and if
      they go on strike, then I can't go to school.  That's it for me."

      Carlos Herrera, 45, is in a similar situation.  A farmworker, Herrera
      said he doesn't know how he'd get to work and back to his home in
      Aptos.

      "I mean, we're talking about my livelihood and my job," said
      Spanish-speaking Herrera, who doesn't own a car.  Even if he did,
      Herrera couldn't drive because he is in the country illegally and not
      allowed to hold a license.

      For passengers in dire straits, bus drivers said they will start a
      ride service with personal vehicles to help shuttle people around.

      "It would be important if a passenger needed something specific that
      they contact their bus driver," said driver and union leader Bonnie
      Morr.

      "Most of this is designed to assist the folks that use the bus all the
      time, our regular riders, a senior that has no other way of getting
      out to get their groceries," Morr said.

      Earlier in the day, almost the entire parking lot of Bart Cavallaro
      Transit Center in Scotts Valley was filled by 8 a.m.

      The Highway 17 Express bus picks up there, and is a popular route for
      Silicon Valley commuters and San Jose State students.

      That bus will not run if drivers strike, even though the route is a
      joint venture with Caltrans, Amtrak, Santa Clara Valley Transportation
      Authority and Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Board.

      That would leave rider Julie Griffith, 22, of Scotts Valley in search
      of a new way to her job as registrar for Ballet San Jose Silicon
      Valley.

      She has taken the bus five days a week for about five years.

      "I'll probably have to take Greyhound," Griffith said.

      Passenger Tamzyn Wagner of Boulder Creek waited in Scotts Valley for
      the bus to Santa Cruz.  Wagner said she already has rides set up.

      It will be an inconvenience, but Wagner said she supports the drivers
      if they walk off the job.

      "I just hope they get what they need," she said.

      Sentinel staff writer Tom Ragan contributed to this report.


      Contact Genevieve Bookwalter at gbookwalter@...





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      Message: 4        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 12:02:04 -0700
        From: "9/1 Santa Cruz Sentinel" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Santa Cruz Metro drivers delay strike

      Published Thursday, September 4, 2005, in the Santa Cruz Sentinel

      Metro drivers delay strike

      By Genevieve Bookwalter

      SANTA CRUZ -- County buses will roll today after drivers decided
      Wednesday to push back their Sept. 1 strike date by a week.

      "A lot of passengers have specific things that they need to handle at
      the beginning of the month," said driver and spokeswoman Carolyn
      Derwing, explaining why Santa Cruz Metropolitan Transit District
      drivers changed the date to walk off the job to Sept. 8.

      "People who need to pick up and cash their Social Security checks,
      they need to get medical prescriptions filled, there are a lot of
      things that our passengers, who are dependent on the system, need at
      the beginning of the month.  That's the main reason we decided to do
      it," Derwing said.

      An afternoon mediation session originally scheduled for Wednesday with
      both sides and a state mediator has been rescheduled for Tuesday.

      The potential strike comes after contract negotiations turned sour
      between Metro and representatives from United Transportation Union
      Local 23, which covers about 160 drivers.

      Both sides have been in talks since spring, and have yet to resolve
      issues regarding health care premium costs and benefits the district
      says it can no longer afford.

      In protest, drivers have refused to work overtime for almost two
      weeks.  That forced dispatchers to cut 10 to 30 percent of daily
      service by shaving trips off various routes.

      With little resolution in sight, Metro board members Friday
      unanimously voted to implement their "last, best and final" contract
      offer, effective today.  Unwilling to work under forced rules, drivers
      that afternoon announced their Sept. 1 strike date -- the same day the
      new contract will begin.

      Wednesday afternoon, some store workers at the Pacific Avenue Metro
      station expressed relief at the strike delay.

      "If the buses don't come, the people won't get here," said Blanca
      Ojeda, who works the cash register at Taqueria El Dandy.  Most of the
      stand's customers are either waiting for or getting off the bus.

      At Santa Cruz Coffee Roasting Co., barista Lucy Silberman said after
      two years behind the brew bar, she's noticed most customers are
      drivers and passengers.

      Many have become her friends, she said, adding while it may cut
      clientele, "I support the bus drivers."

      Metro staff and board members were pleased at the drivers' decision.

      "I think that it would be even better if drivers resumed accepting
      overtime so we could get the reliability back into our schedule," said
      Metro General Manager Les White.

      "I'm excited, I think it's great," added board member and Santa Cruz
      Mayor Mike Rotkin.  "Maybe we'll find a way to avoid this strike.
      That would be good for everybody."


      Contact Genevieve Bookwalter at gbookwalter@...


      What's next
      * TUESDAY: A state mediator meets Tuesday with Metro staff and
       representatives of the drivers' union.
      * SEPT. 8: Drivers walk off their jobs if a contract agreement isn't
       reached.





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      Message: 5        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 12:07:21 -0700
        From: "9/2 Santa Cruz Sentinel" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Santa Cruz RTC head quits, heads for France, glass work

      Published Friday, September 2, 2005, in the Santa Cruz Sentinel

      Acting county transit chief will quit

      By Genevieve Bookwalter

      SANTA CRUZ -- After an "epiphany" in the south of France last month,
      Pat Dellin, interim director of the county's Regional Transportation
      Commission, is quitting her job to move there.

      "I really am just taking off, and I'm going to be reinventing myself
      somehow," Dellin said of the choice she made while vacationing.

      "Sometimes, you've just got to take a leap and see what happens."

      Dellin, an 18-year veteran of the transit commission, announced her
      decision in Thursday's meeting.  She will leave in the spring, giving
      agency officials seven months to find a replacement.

      The opening comes less than a year after former Executive Director
      Linda Wilshusen stepped down in the fall.  Dellin has served as acting
      executive director since Wilshusen retired, and some commissioners
      said they were considering her to fill the spot permanently.

      Dellin's decision also arrives as commissioners seek to buy Union
      Pacific's 32-mile rail line from Davenport to Watsonville; look to
      become autonomous from the county; and hope to begin construction on
      improvements to the Highway 1/17 interchange.

      Now, the oft-divided commission must recruit a new director as well.

      "I'm very sad that Pat's leaving, because I think she has been the
      right person at the right time for the commission," said commission
      chairwoman and county Supervisor Ellen Pirie.  "We're doing a lot of
      difficult work right now."

      Over the next two months, the commission's budget and
      administration/personnel committee will work with county personnel
      workers to design a recruitment plan, Dellin said in Thursday's
      director's report.  That plan will then be forwarded to commissioners.

      Pirie said she would like to see the commission hire someone with
      transportation experience in California, so the new director can start
      with a working knowledge of the state's tricky funding system.

      Ideally, that person would start before Dellin leaves, so Dellin can
      help with training, Pirie said.

      Micah Posner, director of bicycle advocacy group People Power, has
      criticized the agency for some of its top-priority projects, like
      widening Highway 1.  But Posner said he appreciated Dellin's support
      for buying the rail line, and said he hates to see her go.

      "That worries me," Posner said.  "We're in the middle of doing
      something, moving forward, and it's largely because of staff.  So
      changes in staff make me nervous."

      As for Dellin, she said she looks forward to getting back into her art
      studio and working more with fused glass.

      "This job is just very, very demanding," Dellin said.  She added
      later, "My studio now has cobwebs in it."

      "I know I'll always come back to Santa Cruz eventually," Dellin said.
      But with family in Europe, "I'm thinking about an extended stay in
      France or Germany."


      Contact Genevieve Bookwalter at gbookwalter@...





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      Message: 6        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 12:24:06 -0700
        From: "8/31 SJ Metro" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Car sharing

      Published Wednesday, August 31, 2005, in the San Jose Metro

      Car Share

      By Novella Carpenter

      Ever calculate your day?  Like, today I woke up in an apartment that
      costs me $18 a night, turned on the stove and squandered 5 cents worth
      of gas, ate two pieces of bacon that cost 40 cents each and turned on
      the computer that costs .01 cents per hour to run.  This borderline
      obsessive behavior came about because I've been thinking about
      car-ownership costs.

      Just like every other reporter, I've been looking for a new way to
      tell the expensive-gas story; then I remembered about car sharing.
      It's a national trend; it saves gas and public space; and it makes you
      realize how expensive your car is.  Let's break it down.  First,
      there's insurance -- $500 per year for me, which is about $1.50 per
      day -- then fuel, about $3 worth to get where I'm going; throw in a
      dollar's worth of quarters for the meter, and I've already spend $5 in
      a day, which is a lot for me.

      Plus, compared to most people, I'm a total scrounger.  Average folk

      pay $1,000 per year for insurance, use $10 worth of gas, pay for
      parking garages ($10) and make car payments to ride in a presentable
      vehicle and impress people ($10), which totals to almost $45 per day,
      almost half of which you spend even if you don't actually drive the
      vehicle.  Oh!  And I didn't include parking you may have to pay at
      home, car-wash expenditures or maintenance and repairs.

      As of this month, there are 14 different car-share firms with a
      combined membership of 62,000 people.  From for-profit businesses like
      Seattle's Flexcar to Zipcar in Massachusetts to Roaring Fork Vehicles
      in Colorado to nonprofits like San Francisco City CarShare and
      PhillyCar in Philadelphia, these programs serve as models for the rest
      of the nation.  They are better than rental cars in that the cars
      involved are sprinkled throughout urban areas, are reserved by phone
      or the Internet, are charged for by the hour and -- sweet milk and
      honey -- come with gas included.  What with fuel prices as high as
      they are, this is a major bonus.

      Zipcar has the market on fun; it has gone as far as naming its cars:
      Jetta Jed, Matrix Morris, Ella Escape; and its website provides
      recommendations for such things as apple-picking adventures or best
      routes to see fall color.  The company charges $9 per hour or $70 per
      day to use the car, which includes insurance, parking and gas.

      Flexcar, Zipcar's archrival is more serious in tone but has bragging
      rights that it was the first car-share program in the United States.
      The nonprofit S.F. City CarShare (CCS) has a lengthy list of goals for
      its business: first and foremost, the reduction of private car
      ownership.  It seems to be working.  Patrick Barber used to own a car
      but now uses CCS about once a month for errands he can't perform on a
      bicycle -- big grocery trips, hauling pet feed or airport pickups.  He
      pays $4 a hour and 44 cents per mile, in addition to a $11 monthly
      fee.  Each time he's used the service, it ranged in cost from $40 to
      $100.

      "People always balk at the costs," Barber explained, "even though they
      willingly spend hundreds, sometimes thousands per month to own a car.
      I don't get it.  But to be honest, I just don't like cars.  They are
      ungainly, large and expensive to keep and maintain and they smell bad!
      I don't like auto companies, gasoline companies or oil refineries,
      either, so it's nice to not have to support them as much as I did as a
      car owner."

      Obviously, car sharing wouldn't work for someone who, say, drives 40
      miles to work, uses the car during the day or takes long car trips.
      Barber pointed out that using CarShare makes him plan his trips out
      better, thus making them more efficient.  "I often wish that I'd had
      the opportunity to use CarShare earlier on in life; I think of all the
      lousy cars I owned because I couldn't afford anything better, and how
      now I can use a brand-new, clean, efficient, well-maintained car
      whenever I want, for a lot less than I ever spent on the upkeep of my
      gas-guzzling junker."





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      Message: 7        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 11:51:03 -0700
        From: "9/3 Fairfield Republic" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Larger traffic lights coming to Fairfield's Travis Boulevard

      Published Saturday, September 3, 2005, in the Fairfield Daily Republic

      Fairfield lights to get upgrades

      By Barry Eberling

      FAIRFIELD - Traffic signals along eight blocks of Travis Boulevard
      will be getting a new look, perhaps by the end of the year.

      Fairfield plans to replace the green, yellow and red signal lights
      with bigger versions about a foot in diameter.  The lights will go up
      at Travis Boulevard intersections between Oliver Road to North Texas
      Street.

      "You'll be able to see the lights better," City Engineer Gene
      Cortright said.

      Traffic signal lights along this stretch are a variety of sizes, he
      said.  This project will make all lights the same size.  All signal
      lights will be light-emitting diodes, a type that uses less energy
      than those currently in place.

      Fairfield will also do such things as install countdowns on the
      pedestrian crossing signals.  Walkers will see how many seconds they
      have to get across the street.  Pedestrian signals in downtown
      Fairfield already have the countdown.

      In addition, the city will add three left-turn signals.

      One will be at eastbound Travis Boulevard turning onto Fairfield
      Avenue.  The two others will be where Travis Boulevard, Oliver Road
      and a shopping center exit intersect.  One will be for traffic on
      Oliver Road, the other for traffic leaving the shopping center.

      Fairfield is putting the project out to bid.  The city estimates the
      work will cost about $400,000, with 90 percent coming from a federal
      safety grant.  Work could start in November or December.

      Most of the existing traffic poles will remain in place, Cortright
      said.  Workers might block off a lane as they change the lights, he
      said.  There will be restrictions on traffic signal work done in areas
      near the Westfield Solano mall during the holidays, he said.

      Travis Boulevard is among the city's busiest streets and is a major
      east/west link.


      Reach Barry Eberling at 425-4646 Ext. 232 or at beberling@...





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      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 8        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 10:12:37 -0700
        From: "9/4 Oakland Tribune" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: AC Transit fares increase

      Published Sunday, September 4, 2005, in the Oakland Tribune

      AC bus fares will increase this week
      Adult cost rises to $1.75 while senior, youth price will climb to 85
      cents

      By Sean Holstege

      Starting Tuesday, fares on AC Transit will be going up, forcing the
      230,000 people who depend on the East Bay's biggest bus system to dig
      a little deeper in their pockets.

      The base adult cash fare will rise 25 cents, and will cost $1.75,
      while senior, youth and disabled riders will pay 85 cents, up a dime.
      Local transfers will continue to cost 25 cents as long as passengers
      switch buses within 90 minutes of boarding their first bus.

      Monthly passes also will cost $70 instead of $60, but the cost is
      unchanged for youth, at $15, and seniors or disabled at $20.

      AC Transit advises passengers with old ticket books to use their
      tickets before Oct. 15, after which they will not be accepted.
      Passengers can also exchange old tickets for new ones at AC Transit
      ticket counters.  In the meantime, passengers using discount tickets
      will have to make up the difference in cost in cash when they board
      their bus.  Those costs are: 25 cents for adults, 10 cents for
      seniors, youth or disabled riders and 50 cents for adult transbay
      fares.

      Books of 10 tickets will cost $17.50 for adults, up from $15, and
      $8.50 for seniors, youth and disabled riders, up a dollar.

      Holders of monthly passes will not need to pay extra before Oct. 15.
      As with ticket booklets, passes will not be valid after Oct. 15.

      Transbay fares are also going up.  The base cash fare will climb from
      $3 to $3.50, a 10-ride ticket book will cost $35 rather than $30 and a
      monthly pass climbs from $100 to $116.  The only transbay discounts
      for seniors, youth and disabled riders is a $1.70 base cash fare.

      The fare increases were enacted in June, after a series of public
      hearings by the elected AC Transit Board of Directors.  The Board
      toyed with a plan to reduce fares, but quickly learned that it would
      deepen, not alleviate the bus district's budget shortfall.  The fare
      increase closed a $7 million gap in the district's $268 million
      operating budget, and, the district says, was needed to avert a $40
      million deficit by 2008.


      Contact Sean Holstege at sholstege@...






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      Message: 9        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 10:08:02 -0700
        From: "9/4 Marin IJ" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Bill banning GG Bridge from tolling peds, bikes moves ahead

      Published Sunday, September 4, 2005, in the Marin Independent Journal

      Pedestrian toll ban nears Senate vote

      By Mark Prado

      A bill that would prevent Golden Gate Bridge officials from charging
      bicyclists and pedestrians a toll to cross the span could get final
      Senate approval Tuesday and go on to the governor to be signed into
      law.

      At issue is state Assembly Bill 748, sponsored by Assemblywoman Lois
      Wolk, D-Davis, and co-authored by Joe Nation, D-San Rafael, which
      would prohibit agencies from charging bicyclists and pedestrians to
      cross state bridges or roads.

      The Golden Gate Bridge is not run by the state, but the legislation
      states the toll ban would apply to "any bridge or highway facility
      that is part of the state highway system."

      But the Golden Gate Bridge Board of Directors does not like the
      proposed law, saying it would tie their hands as they try to raise
      revenue to deal with a deficit.

      "Our board voted to oppose the legislation," said Mary Currie, a
      bridge district spokeswoman.  "They do not want to have one of their
      revenue sources limited."

      The bridge board has considered charging tolls to bicyclists and
      pedestrians to help eliminate a projected $108 million, five-year
      deficit.  Such a toll could raise $500,000 to $1.5 million annually,
      officials said.  But there is no plan to add tolls at the moment.

      The issue came to the attention of state legislators via the Marin
      County Bicycle Coalition and other bike groups that are concerned the
      bridge district could impose tolls to help relieve the deficit.

      Supporters of the bill are holding a rally at noon today at Crissy
      Field in San Francisco.

      "We are working hard to pass this," said Sam Magill, spokesman for
      Wolk.





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      Message: 10        
        Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2005 10:04:16 -0700
        From: "9/4 Contra Costa Times" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Bay Bridge ramp construction, ramp closure

      Published Sunday, September 4, 2005, in the Contra Contra Times

      No off-ramp from bridge work

      By Mike Adamick

      The Harrison Street off-ramp on the western end of the Bay Bridge will
      close this week in the latest and most inconvenient wave of a seismic
      safety project expected to tangle weekend traffic throughout September
      and into October.

      The off-ramp will close Tuesday night and remain closed for three
      years as Caltrans tears down the existing ramp -- which has been
      deemed unsafe -- and then builds a new one.

      But that's just the first piece of what promised to be an unwieldy
      puzzle as Caltrans attempts to shore up the 70-year-old span while at
      the same time accommodating a crush of traffic.

      Each weekend in September is expected to bring more work and more
      traffic problems.

      "The last weekend in September will have the most impacts," said
      Caltrans spokesman Bart Ney.

      * On Thursday night, traffic headed west into San Francisco will be
      diverted onto a new freeway structure as motorists exit the bridge
      because the existing freeway structure also needs to be rebuilt.

      * From Sept. 16-19, crews will demolish a portion of the westbound
      upper deck during the weekend.  Motorists are advised to find other
      routes into San Francisco or to take public transportation during that
      time.

      * From Sept. 23-26, the demolition will continue.  Again, motorists
      are advised to find other ways into the city during the weekend.

      * From Sept. 30 to Oct. 3, crews will close down the entire eastbound
      lower deck from 1 to 7 a.m. each day, so motorists are advised to take
      other bridges out of San Francisco.  Detour signs will be placed
      throughout the city to remind motorists, and traffic advisories will
      also be sent out, according to Caltrans.

      The work centers around the area where the west span of the Bay Bridge
      connects to land -- a piece called the West Approach.  This
      double-decked section stretches from the bridge to Fifth Street in the
      heart of San Francisco.  Both decks are supported by a single set of
      columns -- the exact configuration of Oakland's Cypress Freeway, which
      collapsed in the 1989 earthquake and led to the deaths of 42 people.

      As part of a $430 million project, Caltrans is going to rebuild the
      West Approach piece by piece, giving each deck its own set of support
      columns, Ney said.

      At the same time, Caltrans must ensure that workday rush-hour traffic
      can flow in and out of San Francisco.  That means most of the needed
      work will be done on the weekends, Ney said.

      Call 511 for travel information while the lane closures are in effect;
      contact the West Approach public information office at (415) 597-5895
      or visit Caltrans online <http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist4/safer>.


      Mike Adamick covers transportation.
      Reach him at 925-945-4745 or madamick@...





      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 11        
        Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2005 06:59:38 -0700
        From: "9/4 New York Times" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Katrina's shock to the oil system

      Published Sunday, September 4, 2005, in the New York Times

      Katrina's Shock to the System

      By Jad Mouawad

      Drivers waiting in line for hours, and occasionally in vain, to fill
      up their tanks.  Gasoline prices shooting up 50 percent or more
      overnight.  The president urging everyone to curtail driving and
      conserve energy at home.  Dark rumors of hoarding and market
      manipulation starting to spread.  Economists warning that soaring
      energy costs will certainly slow economic growth -- and maybe snuff it
      out completely.

      As those scenes played out across the country last week, they may have
      looked familiar, a bit like a replay of the fallout from the Arab oil
      embargo of 30 years ago.  Many energy analysts and economists are not
      surprised.  When Hurricane Katrina ripped through the oil rigs and
      refineries along the Gulf Coast last week, it not only killed at least
      hundreds of people and caused billions of dollars in damage.  It also
      set off the first oil shock of the 21st century.

      "This is a lot like 1973," said Daniel Yergin, who wrote a Pulitzer
      Prize-winning history of oil, "The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil,
      Money and Power," and is the chairman of Cambridge Energy Research
      Associates.  "Since Monday, we've had a supply shock on top of a
      demand shock."

      And just as the 1973 crisis led to a global shortage of oil that sent
      prices soaring and pushed the American economy into recession, today's
      sudden shortfall of gasoline that is rippling through the economy is
      likely to slow American growth by as much as a full percentage point.
      And it leaves global energy markets vulnerable, analysts and
      economists said.

      For two years, steadily rising prices barely weighed on global
      economic growth, in part because of the expanding economies of China
      and the United States, and not from a lack of supply.  The price of
      crude oil on the New York Mercantile Exchange doubled to $66 before
      the hurricane from $33 a barrel in January 2004.  Demand, meanwhile,
      has grown by more than 2 percent annually over the last two years,
      twice the average annual pace over the preceding decade.

      Then came Hurricane Katrina.  With winds as high as 175 miles per
      hour, it shut down most offshore platforms and onshore wells in the
      region -- which accounts for over a quarter of domestic oil production
      -- and idled 10 percent of the country's refining industry.  Those
      assets may be out of commission for months while the industry
      scrambles to repair battered platforms and underwater pipelines.  But
      the effects of the current crisis will be felt around the world for
      much longer.

      In less than a week, gasoline prices have jumped by as much as 60
      cents a gallon, with stations selling premium grades at an average $3
      a gallon, according to AAA.  On average, gasoline is 50 percent more
      expensive than it was last year.  "We're in uncharted territory," said
      John Felmy, the chief economist at the American Petroleum Institute,
      the industry's main trade group.  "We haven't experienced something
      like this since the 1980's."

      That was when Iran sent oil markets roiling.  With the departure of
      the shah, the establishment of the Islamic revolution, and, in 1981,
      the start of a long and bloody war between Iran and Iraq, oil exports
      from the Persian Gulf plummeted, sending oil prices to their
      highest-ever level of nearly $40 a barrel -- about $86 a barrel in
      today's dollars.

      Then, as now, drivers, factories, power plants and others were
      consuming oil as fast as oil companies could refine crude oil into
      fuel or other products.  Any significant disruption to the supply was
      quickly magnified in the markets.

      One problem today is the supply of crude oil.  Years of
      underinvestment in exploration mean that producers now lack the
      capacity to bolster production in any significant way to make up for
      intermittent shortages.  Even Saudi Arabia, which had millions of
      barrels of untapped production capability in the 1980's, is now
      pumping at close to full capacity.

      But far more important for the current energy crisis, a lack of
      refining capacity constrains the industry's ability to turn crude oil,
      even when it is available, into usable products like gasoline or jet
      fuel.

      The nation's strategic reserve is stocked with enough oil to last
      about 35 days, and refiners hold an additional 25 days' worth of
      supplies.  But with hurricane-hammered refineries out of business for
      now, the immediate pinch comes in turning oil into gasoline.  The
      shortage of refineries explains why gasoline futures surged 14 percent
      last week while crude oil prices gained only 2 percent.  Oil touched a
      high of $70.85 on Wednesday and closed at $67.57 a barrel on Friday;
      gasoline futures on Nymex, which touched $2.92 a gallon at midweek,
      ended the week at $2.18.

      From Aug. 26, when platforms were evacuated in anticipation of the
      storm, until Friday, the total amount of lost oil production was 8.7
      million barrels -- or about 1.3 million barrels a day.  That's not
      much compared with what was lost during the Arab oil embargo after the
      1973 Yom Kippur war between Egypt and Israel.  Then, an embargo on oil
      shipments to the United States led to a shortage of about five million
      barrels a day at its worst point, in December 1973.

      The trouble was that America did not have any spare production
      capacity at that time, in contrast to the situation six years earlier,
      during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war.  "Without it," Mr. Yergin wrote in
      "The Prize," "the United States had lost its critical ability to
      influence the world oil market."

      Something very similar is happening today.  But this time, the United
      States has no refining capacity to spare.  "The hurricane created a
      crisis, but the roots of the problem are much deeper than that," said
      Robert Mabro, president of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies,
      and an authority on energy issues.

      "The refining system is stretched, with no reserves, no excess
      capacity, no cushion," he said.  "The fundamental problem is that we
      depend on oil companies that dislike the refining business because of
      historically low returns but whose deficit can produce an economic,
      social and political crisis."

      But Mr. Mabro added: "There is an obligation to supply.  For
      consumers, it's a public utility.  If people can't get gas, they
      become furious, they become violent, they create trouble.  Energy is a
      necessity."

      No new refinery has been built in the United States since 1976.  Over
      the last quarter-century, the number of refineries has fallen by more
      than half, to 149.  Some, but not all, of that capacity has been made
      up by expanding or improving existing facilities.  Refining capacity
      has declined by 10 percent, to 17 million barrels a day.

      Over the same period, however, gasoline consumption has risen by 45
      percent, to 9.5 million barrels a day.  Domestic consumption of oil,
      including that used to make gasoline, is more than 20 million barrels
      a day.

      The 1973 and 1979-80 energy crises revealed how vulnerable
      industrialized economies were to sudden spikes in oil prices, and to
      shortages in supplies.  Both shocks led to lasting recessions, high
      inflation and dismal economic prospects.  Oil producers realized how
      powerful the oil weapon could be but they also noticed that it was
      double-edged.  The Arab oil embargo lasted from October 1973 through
      March 1974.  Higher prices quickly led to recessions, which in turn
      lowered economic activity -- and therefore lowered oil consumption.

      As a sign of the seriousness of the current crisis, Western
      governments on Friday pledged to release their emergency oil stocks to
      help plug the oil gap in the United States.  The International Energy
      Agency, which was created in 1974 in the aftermath of the first oil
      shock, said its members would release two million barrels a day for
      the next 30 days.  This was only the second time that the agency,
      based in Paris, had taken such a step.  The first was in 1991 during
      the Persian Gulf war.

      "This historic response is a remarkable signal of international
      solidarity in the face of the largest national disaster in America's
      history," said Samuel W. Bodman, the secretary of energy.

      With all the parallels, there are substantial differences between 1973
      and 2005 that might soften the blow to the economy.  For example, in
      the 1970's, oil purchases accounted for twice as large a share of the
      gross domestic product as they do today.  And back then, the American
      government had price controls on oil as well as an allocation system
      intended to ensure that all regions were supplied evenly.  That system
      backfired because it kept prices artificially low, thereby encouraging
      demand when supplies were short.  Allocations from the government also
      did little to move supplies where they were most needed.  The results
      were long lines at the gas pump and shortages in some places but not
      in others.

      Still, with no government control over either prices or supplies --
      and despite the global emergency coordination, the pledges of rising
      European imports and the loans from American strategic stocks -- the
      risks to oil markets remain very high, analysts and economists said.
      The economy may be able to withstand current prices, but energy
      markets are at the mercy of the slightest glitch anywhere around the
      globe that can push prices even higher.

      "If we had a major disruption in supplies elsewhere on top of that we
      could definitely go to triple-digit oil prices, no problem," said
      Vincent Lauerman, the global energy analyst at the Canadian Energy
      Research Institute, in Calgary, Alberta.  "What we have right now is a
      runaway freight train.  There's nothing I can see between it and
      higher prices."

      The idea of $100-a-barrel oil, which was scoffed at as recently as two
      weeks ago, is now not so far-fetched.  And its effect would be
      substantial.

      "If oil hit $100, it would have quite a debilitating effect," said
      William Hummer, the chief economist at Wayne Hummer Investments.  "The
      economy would slow to a crawl.  We'd have a return to stagflation,
      that cliché from the 1970's.  We'd see a huge cutback in driving.  The
      sacrifices would be severe.  It would be another blow to the airlines
      and the whole transportation sector."

      The Eurasia Group, a political risk consulting firm in New York,
      identified potential events in nine countries that could send prices
      higher -- from terrorist attacks in Saudi Arabia, to which it gave a
      10 percent probability; to unrest by oil workers in Nigeria, a 30
      percent probability; or attacks on Iraq's oil industry, with a 50-50
      probability.

      In other words, said Mr. Felmy of the American Petroleum Institute:
      "There is no question that this is a global issue.  We're all in this
      together."






      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 12        
        Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2005 08:19:33 -0700
        From: "8/30 Associated Press" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Environmental groups challenge Tuck appointment to Air Board

      Published Tuesday, August 30, 2005, by the Associated Press

      Environmental groups challenge governor's air board appointment

      Don Thompson

      The American Lung Association and other clean-air advocates are
      opposing Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's nominee to head the state agency
      in charge of air regulations, saying her background in the energy
      industry makes her ill-suited for the job.

      Several state lawmakers and environmental groups held a news
      conference Tuesday denouncing the appointment of Cindy Tuck as
      chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board.  Her appointment is
      to be considered Wednesday by a Senate committee.

      "Ms. Tuck's career and lobbying positions have been dedicated to
      promoting business interests over public health," said Bonnie
      Holmes-Gen, a vice president with the American Lung Association of
      California.

      Opponents said Tuck's 15 years as a lobbyist for the oil and energy
      industries make it impossible for her to objectively regulate those
      businesses' air emissions.

      California has led the nation in toughening air pollution standards,
      actions that have prompted court battles with auto manufacturers.  The
      lung association says poor air quality potentially affects the health
      of nine of every 10 Californians.  The dirty air has driven up asthma
      and other disease rates, particularly in children and the elderly,
      according to the group.

      Before Schwarzenegger appointed her to the air board in June, Tuck
      worked for the California Council for Economic and Environmental
      Balance.  Environmental groups say that group lobbied for oil and
      energy companies opposed to stronger pollution laws and regulations.

      Julie Soderlund, a spokeswoman for the Republican governor, said
      politics is driving the effort to remove a well-qualified chairwoman.

      "Ms. Tuck is dedicated to improving California's air quality,
      protecting our environment, and she should be given a chance to serve
      our state," Soderlund said.

      Tuck did not respond to interview requests.  But in a written response
      to the Senate Rules Committee, she promised to uphold the board's
      leadership position and implement Schwarzenegger's initiatives.

      Alan Lloyd, secretary of the California Environmental Protection
      Agency, said the nomination for his successor nearly went to another
      individual who withdrew from consideration.  Schwarzenegger then chose
      from several qualified candidates, picking Tuck.

      Lloyd said he closely questioned Tuck during that process because of
      her background and came away impressed by "her real sincere desire and
      her knowledge of the issues."

      "I strongly believe she can do the job," said Lloyd, who won
      environmentalists' praise when he headed the air board.  "She will
      carry on the strong traditions of the Air Resources Board."

      California Farm Bureau Federation Administrator George Gomes said
      environmental groups are upset because "she's not been somebody viewed
      as biased toward the extremist viewpoint, the environmentalist
      viewpoint.  ... She's always trying to make her decisions based on
      facts and science."

      Tuck's opponents said the appointment seems counter to
      Schwarzenegger's attempts to be a national leader on air quality
      issues.  The governor has proposed a "hydrogen highway" effort to
      promote the use of that low pollution gas, plans to cut air pollution
      in half by 2010 and has called for an 80 percent reduction in
      greenhouse gas emissions over the next 50 years.

      "If you look at where the governor is on greenhouse gases and what his
      goals are, I'm not sure that his appointment would actually support
      that given her past positions on some of these issues," said Sen. Dean
      Florez, D-Shafter, who has promoted clean air bills and joined others
      opposing Tuck's nomination.

      The recommendation by the Senate Rules Committee will go to the
      Democrat-controlled Senate for consideration before next week's
      adjournment.  Rejection means she would have to leave office within 60
      days.





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      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 13        
        Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2005 08:27:44 -0700
        From: "8/31 SF Chronicle" <batn@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Editorial: Cindy Tuck a dismal pick to chair CARB

      Published Wednesday, August 31, 2005, in the San Francisco Chronicle

      Editorial

      Wrong pick for air board

      You can fault Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger for his stands on schools,
      taxes or a needless special election coming in November.  But on the
      environment, he has generally proved responsible and attuned to state
      voters.

      Why, then, is he pushing a longtime advocate for the energy industry
      to, of all spots, head of the state smog board?  Cindy Tuck is
      credited with intelligence and a temperate style, but she also comes
      equipped with the wrong resume to be head of the state Air Resources
      Board.

      The $121,708-per-year post oversees the panel's decisions on clean-air
      policies.  Take your pick of important issues: vehicle tailpipe
      controls, refinery emissions and mileage standards for
      cars.  California has the ill-starred honor of having some of the
      worst air in the nation as foun

      (Message over 64 KB, truncated)
    • irvin dawid
      In addition to (or instead of) BATN, MTC has a library that emails daily , in a digest version, of articles related to transportation (and then some). I ll
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 7, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        In addition to (or instead of) BATN, MTC has a "library" that emails daily ,
        in a digest version, of articles related to transportation (and then some).
        I'll send some info on 'how to subscribe' - does anyone have the
        instructions (its been so long since I've been getting it...). Unlike BATN,
        the MTC Library sends links only - sometimes a pain in the.... For e.g,
        I've not been able to access this particular WSJ article....does anyone have
        a subscription?

        HEADLINES FOR SEPTEMBER 6, 2005

        Rising Gas Prices May Force States To Suspend Tax
        http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112596989840632340,00.html?mod=todays_us_page_one

        Finally, SJSU MURPS subscribers should also recognize that the option that
        Dr. Weinstein suggests for BATN - the "digest version", can also be applied
        here, to this listserv ----if you want only 1 email instead of individual
        postings, go to homepage: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SJSU_MURPs/

        click on "members", find your email address, and change your Email Delivery
        to digest...or the other options listed....

        Now, does anyone have that WSJ subscription????

        Irvin Dawid

        ----Original Message Follows----
        From: asha.weinstein@...
        To: SJSU_MURPs@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SJSU_MURPs] Interested in Bay Area transportation planning? Join
        BATN!
        Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2005 22:09:57 -0700

        Greetings, MURPs members -

        Those of you interested in transportation issues in the Bay Area may wish
        to join an email list group called "San Francisco Bay Area Transportation
        News," or BATN. This is an amazing collection of newspaper articles, as
        well as magazine articles and an occasional press release, on every aspect
        of Bay Area transportation issues. In the last week, for example, 95
        items have been distributed. But don't be afraid of overwhelming your
        in-box. I suggest you sign up for the "digest version," which comes a few
        times a week and begins with a handy index of the articles, so you can
        skim to see if there is anything interesting to you. I'm forwarding the
        latest issue in this message, so you can see what it's like.

        For those of you not particularly interested in transportation planning,
        you might still find the list interesting, as there are a number of issues
        on topics like smart growth and environmental planning that only touch on
        transportation tangentially.

        To subscribe, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BATN/ and click on "Join
        This Group."

        Best regards,

        Asha Weinstein

        Assistant Professor
        Department of Urban and Regional Planning
        San Jos� State University
        One Washington Square
        San Jose, CA 95192-0185
        email: asha.weinstein@...
        phone: 408-924-5853
        web page: http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/weinstein/

        ----- Forwarded by Asha Weinstein/SJSU on 09/06/2005 10:04 PM -----
      • Michael Kelly
        If you are interested in the MTC library s daily transportation newsdigest, you can either subscribe to their e-mailing list as Irvin described or you canfind
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 7, 2005
        • 0 Attachment

          If you are interested in the MTC library's daily transportation news digest, you can either subscribe to their e-mailing list as Irvin described or you can find identical content by visiting the following MTC web page:

          http://www.mtc.ca.gov/news/headlines.htm

          UC Berkeley's Institute of Transportation Studies has something similar at the following address (although it seems not to have been updated in the past week and a half):

          http://www.its.berkeley.edu/news/MediaArticles.html

          But BATN is a very good choice if you want to read just one digest (the moderator is quite opinionated, by the way):

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BATN

          Michael


          
          
          > -------Original Message------- > From: irvin dawid > Subject: RE: [SJSU_MURPs] Interested in Bay Area transportation planning? Join BATN! > Sent: 07 Sep '05 14:22 > > In addition to (or instead of) BATN, MTC has a "library" that emails daily , > in a digest version, of articles related to transportation (and then some). > I'll send some info on 'how to subscribe' - does anyone have the > instructions (its been so long since I've been getting it...). Unlike BATN, > the MTC Library sends links only - sometimes a pain in the.... For e.g, > I've not been able to access this particular WSJ article....does anyone have > a subscription? > > HEADLINES FOR SEPTEMBER 6, 2005 > > Rising Gas Prices May Force States To Suspend Tax > http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112596989840632340,00.html?mod=todays_us_page_one > > Finally, SJSU MURPS subscribers should also recognize that the option that > Dr. Weinstein suggests for BATN - the "digest version", can also be applied > here, to this listserv ----if you want only 1 email instead of individual > postings, go to homepage: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SJSU_MURPs/ > > click on "members", find your email address, and change your Email Delivery > to digest...or the other options listed.... > > Now, does anyone have that WSJ subscription???? > > Irvin Dawid > > ----Original Message Follows---- > From: asha.weinstein@... > To: SJSU_MURPs@yahoogroups.com > Subject: [SJSU_MURPs] Interested in Bay Area transportation planning? Join > BATN! > Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2005 22:09:57 -0700 > > Greetings, MURPs members - > > Those of you interested in transportation issues in the Bay Area may wish > to join an email list group called "San Francisco Bay Area Transportation > News," or BATN. This is an amazing collection of newspaper articles, as > well as magazine articles and an occasional press release, on every aspect > of Bay Area transportation issues. In the last week, for example, 95 > items have been distributed. But don't be afraid of overwhelming your > in-box. I suggest you sign up for the "digest version," which comes a few > times a week and begins with a handy index of the articles, so you can > skim to see if there is anything interesting to you. I'm forwarding the > latest issue in this message, so you can see what it's like. > > For those of you not particularly interested in transportation planning, > you might still find the list interesting, as there are a number of issues > on topics like smart growth and environmental planning that only touch on > transportation tangentially. > > To subscribe, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BATN/ and click on "Join > This Group." > > Best regards, > > Asha Weinstein > > Assistant Professor > Department of Urban and Regional Planning > San José State University > One Washington Square > San Jose, CA 95192-0185 > email: asha.weinstein@... > phone: 408-924-5853 > web page: http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/weinstein/ > > ----- Forwarded by Asha Weinstein/SJSU on 09/06/2005 10:04 PM ----- > > > > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~--> > DonorsChoose.org helps at-risk students succeed. Fund a student project today! > http://us.click.yahoo.com/G7lQgA/FpQLAA/HwKMAA/4tWolB/TM > --------------------------------------------------------------------~-> > > > Yahoo! Groups Links > > <*> To visit your group on the web, go to: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SJSU_MURPs/ > > <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to: > SJSU_MURPs-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com > > <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to: > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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