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Email list on environmental history (and discussion of the Katrina disaster in historical perspective)

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  • asha.weinstein@sjsu.edu
    Greetings, MURPS members - Some of you who have an interest in environmental history and planning history may wish to subscribe to H-Environment, a
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 6, 2005
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      Greetings, MURPS members -

      Some of you who have an interest in environmental history and planning history may wish to subscribe to "H-Environment," a list-serve that posts discussions and book reviews on those topics.    Members range from graduate students, to people interested in environmental history though without a professional connection, to some of the pre-eminent scholars in the country writing about environmental history.  Below you will find the latest set of postings, which discuss the Katrina hurricane and compare it to past natural disasters.  ( Note that I have forwarded the "digest" version, which compiles several days' messages and sends them as a single email, a way to reduce traffic in your email in-box.)

      For information about H-Environment, including a link to subscribe, go to: http://www.h-net.org/~environ/.  Note that there are many other lists run by H-Net that you can also join, on a wide variety of historical topics from California history to urban history.


      Regards,

      Asha Weinstein

      Assistant Professor
      Department of Urban and Regional Planning
      San José State University
      One Washington Square
      San Jose, CA 95192-0185
      email: asha.weinstein@...
      phone: 408-924-5853
      web page: http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/weinstein/


      ----- Forwarded by Asha Weinstein/SJSU on 09/06/2005 09:57 PM -----
      H-ENVIRONMENT automatic digest system <LISTSERV@...>
      Sent by: H-NET List for Environmental History <H-ENVIRONMENT@...>

      09/06/2005 09:12 PM

      Please respond to
      H-NET List for Environmental History <H-ENVIRONMENT@...>

      To
      H-ENVIRONMENT@...
      cc
      Subject
      H-ENVIRONMENT Digest - 2 Sep 2005 to 6 Sep 2005 (#2005-138)





      There are 16 messages totalling 816 lines in this issue.

      Topics of the day:

       1. Article on Louisiana wetlands written in 2004
       2. Old source book for lectures on floods
       3. STS at Clemson
       4. Racism and Katrina (5)
       5. Racism and Katrina (2nd Attempt)
       6. courses featuring New Orleans disaster (5)
       7. Boston Environmental History Seminar Series
       8. Mumbai and New Orleans

      ----------------------------------------------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 09:03:50 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <mwiedenfeld@...>
      Subject: Article on Louisiana wetlands written in 2004

      A colleague sent me the following link for an article in National Geographic
      magazine that discusses Louisiana wetlands.  I think it's pertinent to the
      environmental history of the region--and considering the effects of
      Hurricane Katrina.

      http://www3.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0410/feature5/


      Melissa Wiedenfeld
      H-Environment Editor




      ______________________________________________________________________
      EL CONTENIDO DE ESTE MENSAJE ES DE ABSOLUTA RESPONSABILIDAD DEL AUTOR.
      FUNDACION CHARLES DARWIN
      WWW.DARWINFOUNDATION.ORG

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 08:35:43 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <mwiedenfeld@...>
      Subject: Old source book for lectures on floods

      From: "Uwe Lübken" <luebken@...>
      Sent: Friday, September 02, 2005 6:01 PM
      Subject: Re: Old source book for lectures on floods


      Working on the history of river floods in the Ohio Valley, I came across at
      least several dozen books, pamphlets, pictorials and "historic souvenirs"
      similar to the one by Logan Marshall. If you include the Mississippi and
      other rivers, there are probably a couple of hundred flood publications of
      this type.

      The genre-like character of these kind of works becomes obvious if you
      compare Logan's book to Frederick E. Drinker's "Horrors of Tornado, Flood
      and Fire, Containing a Full and Thrilling Account of the Most Appalling
      Calamities of Modern Times," Philadelphia, PA, 1913.

      Here are some more examples:

      Funk, Nellis Rebok, A Pictorial History of the Great Dayton Flood, March 25,
      26, 27, 1913. Dayton, OH, 1913.

      Flood Souvenir: Views of Hamilton, Ohio, During and after the Great Flood of
      March, 1913. Hamilton, OH, 1913.

      Hamm, Harry H., Souvenir, Louisville's Greatest Flood. Jeffersonville and
      New Albany, Indiana. 145 Scenes. Cincinnati, OH, 1937.

      Jacobi, C., A Photographic Story of the Disastrous Flood at Hamilton, Ohio,
      March 1913. 100 Excellent Views. Hamilton, OH, 1913.



      These accounts are certainly interesting to read and they often contain a
      lot of fascinating pictures and stories, but before you base your classroom
      lectures on this sometimes sensationalist and often uncritical material you
      should check with other sources.


      Uwe Luebken
      German Historical Institute
      Washington, DC





      ______________________________________________________________________
      EL CONTENIDO DE ESTE MENSAJE ES DE ABSOLUTA RESPONSABILIDAD DEL AUTOR.
      FUNDACION CHARLES DARWIN
      WWW.DARWINFOUNDATION.ORG

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 08:45:21 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <mwiedenfeld@...>
      Subject: STS at Clemson

      From: "Pam Mack" <pammack@...>
      Sent: Monday, September 05, 2005 3:02 PM
      Subject: STS at Clemson


      Clemson University has advertised a job in history of technology and
      environmental history, and I want to both provide background information
      about the job and inquire about experience at other universities with
      Science and Technology in Society as a general education requirement.

      Clemson University went through a long struggle to develop revised general
      education requirements.  Somehow out of this struggle came a reduction of
      the lab science requirement from two semesters to one semester, with the
      stipulation that students must take another science course (not necessarily
      with lab) and also a course dealing with Science and Technology in
      Society.  Suddenly we need to move 3000 students a year through courses
      that meet the STS requirement. It can be met by a variety of courses from
      different departments, in some cases in combination with other
      requirements--we have courses that meet both the STS and non-lab science
      requirements, courses that meet the STS and humanities requirement, and (so
      far just one) course that meets the STS and social science
      requirements.  That course, called History Technology and Society (see
      http://www.clemson.edu/caah/history/FacultyPages/PamMack/syl122.html) is so
      much in demand that we have money from the provost's office to hire another
      tenure-track faculty member to teach it and a new course in environmental
      history, which I created so I wouldn't have to teach the technology course
      every semester.  A very preliminary syllabus for that course can be found
      at:
      http://www.clemson.edu/caah/history/FacultyPages/PamMack/syl124.html
      Upper level courses would be quite flexible, but those two courses would be
      the bread and butter of the position.  The history department at Clemson
      has a tradition that each faculty member chooses their own books, so there
      would be no expectation that the person hired follow my syllabi or use the
      same books.

      For more information on the STS program as it is developing at Clemson,
      please see http://www.clemson.edu/sts  I would be interested in any
      syllabi, case studies, or other material people can share about teaching
      STS in general education courses.  I particularly need questions that can
      be added to the student evaluation questionnaire to assess the STS content
      of very different courses.  Has anyone tried to do STS assessment?

      The job advertisement is already up on H-Net, but please pass word of it
      and this explanation of the context of the job on to anyone you know who
      may be interested.

      Pam Mack
      Coordinator of STS



      The job ad reads:


      Technology/Environmental.  The Department of History, Clemson University,
      invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professorship to begin
      August 15, 2006.  Preference for 19th and 20th century US.  Applicants can
      expect to teach introductory courses in the history of technology and
      environmental history and to participate in development of a general
      education STS program, in addition to upper level undergraduate and
      graduate courses in the candidate's field.  Salary competitive and
      commensurate with experience.  PhD in hand by August 16, 2006.  Applicants
      should display promise of teaching excellence and strong evidence of
      scholarly potential.  The search committee will begin reviewing
      applications on October 1, 2005, and continue until the position is
      filled.  The committee intends to interview at the HSS/SHOT meeting in
      Minneapolis, November 3-6, and possibly also at the AHA annual
      meeting.  Send letter of application, cv, at least three letters of
      recommendation, and a writing sample to Pamela Mack, Chair, Screening
      Committee, Department of History, Clemson University, Clemson, SC,
      29634-0527.  Clemson University is an AA/EOE.




      ______________________________________________________________________
      EL CONTENIDO DE ESTE MENSAJE ES DE ABSOLUTA RESPONSABILIDAD DEL AUTOR.
      FUNDACION CHARLES DARWIN
      WWW.DARWINFOUNDATION.ORG

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 09:15:25 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <mwiedenfeld@...>
      Subject: Racism and Katrina

      From: <NLITENME@...>
      Sent: Sunday, September 04, 2005 8:42 AM
      Subject: Racism and Katrina


      I would like to thank Diane Glave for pointing out to the list the
      discussion about "racism" and Katrina which is slowly emerging in the media;
      as  well as elucidating how this disaster has disproportionately impacted  African
      Americans in the region.

      This phenomena of environmental inequities (as a function of race and
      class) has a historic precedent...the  Great Mississippi Flood of  1927.  The role
      of race in responding to flooding in this region during ths  period is
      explored in depth by John M. Barry in his 1997 monograph,   Rising Tide:  The Great
      Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed  America.  The current
      migration of Katrina flood victims particularly  to Chicago also mirrors the migration
      patterns of 1927 flood  victims.  Barry's book also touches upon how the
      flood of 1927 played  a critical role in severing the bonds between African Americans
      and the  Republican party because of the party's poor response and rescue
      efforts under  the leadership of (republican) President Herbert Hoover.  The
      parallels in  terms of the response and political ramifications are eerily
      similar.

      In  1927  the Mississippi river's levee system suffered  ruptures in 145
      places flooding 27,000 square miles.  The flood  resulted in the
      displacement of 700,000 people and 330,000 of these were African  Americans.   The African
      American refugees were placed in 154 relief  camps and forced to labor at
      gunpoint during relief efforts.  Unfortunately  the lack of trust by some of the
      contemporary flood victims may  be impacted not only by their current social
      economic status but also  by the memories of past environmental
      disenfranchisements associated with  natural and unnatural disasters in the region (like the
      area's notorious  Cancer Alley). African Americans in New Orleans are not
      being forced to  labor but are under a constant threat of violence from fellow
      disaster victims  and now potentially from crossfire from military police
      who have been ordered to  shoot to kill looters (some that are armed).

      Other books which address the issue of African Americans, the 1927 flood
      and
      the Great Migrations which might be of interest are Pete Daniel's Deep"N  As
      It Come: The 1927 Mississippi River Flood,  Mike Tidewell's  Bayou Farewell:
      The Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana's Cajun  Coast, James C. Cobb's
      The
      Most Southern Place on Earth and  my monograph, Packing Them In:  An
      Archaeology of Environmental Racism  in Chicago, 1865-1954.

      Sylvia Washington, MSE, Ph.D.
      University of Maryland, University College, History
      Northwestern University, Department of Civil and Environmental  Engineering
      ______________________________________________________________________
      EL CONTENIDO DE ESTE MENSAJE ES DE ABSOLUTA RESPONSABILIDAD DEL AUTOR.
      FUNDACION CHARLES DARWIN
      WWW.DARWINFOUNDATION.ORG

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 11:37:58 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: Racism and Katrina

      From: "Ken Cousins" <kcousins@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 10:35 AM
      Subject: Re: Racism and Katrina

      I second Diane and Sylvia's comments, but would like to emphasize that
      comparative case studies of the institutional preparation and responses
      to hurricanes Charley (Florida, 2004) and Katrina would likely be a VERY
      important contribution.

      Ken Cousins
      Harrison Program on the Future Global Agenda
      Department of Government and Politics
      3114 P Tydings Hall
      University of Maryland, College Park
      T: (301) 405-6862
      F:  (301) 314-9690
      kcousins@...

      www.bsos.umd.edu/gvpt/kcousins
      http://augmentation.blogspot.com

      "The important thing is not to stop questioning.
      Curiosity has its own reason for existing."
            Albert Einstein

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 13:39:22 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: Racism and Katrina (2nd Attempt)

      From: <NLITENME@...>
      Sent: Sunday, September 04, 2005 8:42 AM
      Subject: Racism and Katrina

      I would like to thank Diane Glave for pointing out to the list the
      discussion about "racism" and Katrina which is slowly emerging in the media;
      as  well
      as elucidating how this disaster has disproportionately impacted  African
      Americans in the region.

      This phenomena of environmental inequities (as a function of race and
      class)
      has a historic precedent...the  Great Mississippi Flood of  1927.  The role
      of race in responding to flooding in this region during ths  period is
      explored
      in depth by John M. Barry in his 1997 monograph,   Rising Tide:  The Great
      Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed  America.  The current
      migration of
      Katrina flood victims particularly  to Chicago also mirrors the migration
      patterns of 1927 flood  victims.  Barry's book also touches upon how the
      flood of
      1927 played  a critical role in severing the bonds between African Americans
      and the  Republican party because of the party's poor response and rescue
      efforts under  the leadership of (republican) President Herbert Hoover.  The
      parallels in  terms of the response and political ramifications are eerily
      similar.

      In  1927  the Mississippi river's levee system suffered  ruptures in 145
      places flooding 27,000 square miles.  The flood  resulted in the
      displacement of
      700,000 people and 330,000 of these were African  Americans.   The African
      American refugees were placed in 154 relief  camps and forced to labor at
      gunpoint
      during relief efforts.  Unfortunately  the lack of trust by some of the
      contemporary flood victims may  be impacted not only by their current social
      economic status but also  by the memories of past environmental
      disenfranchisements
      associated with  natural and unnatural disasters in the region (like the
      area's notorious  Cancer Alley). African Americans in New Orleans are not
      being
      forced to  labor but are under a constant threat of violence from fellow
      disaster victims  and now potentially from crossfire from military police
      who have
      been ordered to  shoot to kill looters (some that are armed).

      Other books which address the issue of African Americans, the 1927 flood
      and
      the Great Migrations which might be of interest are Pete Daniel's Deep"N  As
      It Come: The 1927 Mississippi River Flood,  Mike Tidewell's  Bayou Farewell:
      The Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana's Cajun  Coast, James C. Cobb's
      The
      Most Southern Place on Earth and  my monograph, Packing Them In:  An
      Archaeology of Environmental Racism  in Chicago, 1865-1954.

      Sylvia Washington, MSE, Ph.D.
      University of Maryland, University College, History
      Northwestern University, Department of Civil and Environmental  Engineering

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 11:43:24 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: courses featuring New Orleans disaster

      From: "Betsy Mendelsohn" <bmendel@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 11:29 AM
      Subject: courses featuring New Orleans disaster


      Hi colleagues,

      I am interested in learning about courses that will feature
      New Orleans in the context of the disaster.  Thanks to Craig
      Colten,  Ari Kelman, Marty Reuss, Ted Steinberg, and others
      who have written valuable histories of the area and have
      discussed human agency in natural disasters.

      The course below seems to focus on some of the issues raised
      by Diane Glave and Sylvia Washington.

      Regards,

      Betsy

      *******

      NEW ORLEANS: AN AMERICAN POMPEII?
      American Culture 301:02/ History 4XX

      Instructor: Prof. Lawrence Powell, Professor of History,
      Tulane University.  Visiting Professor, University of
      Michigan, September-October 2005.

      This seminar will address the recent New Orleans disaster in
      the context  of the city's history, ecology, and class and
      racial structures.  Students will work in teams on such topics
      as the environmental  background and impact of the flooding;
      property law and urban redesign;  public health and medical
      care; governance; media coverage; and the  class and racial
      dynamics of neighborhood evolution. The approach will  be both
      historical and interdisciplinary, and will build on research
      by  the student working groups as well as presentations and
      discussions led  by the instructor.

      The instructor:  Lawrence Powell, Professor of History at
      Tulane  University, is a specialist on the history of the
      United States South,  particularly Louisiana.  ...  During
      September-October 2005, he will be  visiting professor in the
      Program in American Culture and the Department  of History at
      the University of Michigan.  
      Betsy Mendelsohn

      Adjunct Lecturer
      History Department & College Park Scholars Program
      University of Maryland
      College Park, MD 20742

      bmendel@...

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 13:47:37 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: Racism and Katrina

      From: "Uwe Lübken" <luebken@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 1:43 PM
      Subject: Re: Racism and Katrina


      On the 1927 Mississippi flood, there is also a PBS video ("Fatal Flood: A
      Story of Greed, Power and Race") which is to a large extent based on Barry's book.
      Although the video focuses on the story of LeRoy and Will Percy, it contains
      a lot of footage on the African American experience of the flood and especially on the issues
      Sylvia mentions.

      Uwe Luebken
      Environmental History Fellow
      German Historical Institute
      Washington, DC

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 15:33:23 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: courses featuring New Orleans disaster

      From: Marc Poirier=20
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 2:22 PM
      Subject: courses featuring New Orleans disaster

      I am currently hoping that my next year's teaching package will include =
      a seminar on coastal and ocean law (I've taught one before) with =
      significant focus on the New Orleans/Katrina debacle as well as what I =
      suspect are systematic and perhaps unavoidable flaws in planning for =
      this kind of natural disaster.  I expect that I might actually get a =
      good enrollment for a change.  As the time draws near I'll approach this =
      list for suggestions as to syllabi and materials.   By then many of you =
      all will have done plenty of work.=20

      On the links between environmental justice issues and localized risky =
      land uses, well, of course.  Poor and powerless people, often people of =
      color, end up living and working in the undesirable locations, which can =
      often be the places that flood.  It's not on the same scale here in New =
      Jersey, but we certainly have subdivisions and even whole towns that =
      ought to be bought out and shut down because they flood so often.  =
      Abstract just a little bit -- the same disempowered folks will end up =
      living in places susceptible to toxic clouds from industry (Louisiana =
      again provides a clear example), noise and air pollution from highways, =
      and so on.  These communities are usually impotent politically, and do =
      not command the subsidies that higher-rent and more politically powerful =
      communities do to deal with their local land use and environmental =
      issues.  For a brief moment, some of that came clear last week.  We'll =
      see how long people remember what was so evident last week in the =
      coverage of Katrina.=20

      Warmly,=20

      Marc R. Poirier
      Professor of Law
      Seton Hall University School of Law
      One Newark Center
      Newark, NJ  07102
      973-642-8478=20

      Yeas ago I wrote an article linking some of these issues to risk =
      perception and power, as well.  =20

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 15:41:16 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: Racism and Katrina

      From: "Vagel Keller" <vckeller@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 1:53 PM
      Subject: Racism and Katrina


      >  Barry's book also touches upon how the flood of
      >1927 played  a critical role in severing the bonds between African
      >Americans
      >and the  Republican party because of the party's poor response
      and rescue
      >efforts under  the leadership of (republican) President Herbert
      Hoover.
      >The
      >parallels in  terms of the response and political ramifications
      are eerily
      >similar.

      As John Adams said in summing up his successful defense of British
      soldiers accused of murder in the Boston Massacre, "Facts are
      stubborn things."

      Hoover was Secretary of Commerce under Pres. Calvin Coolidge at the
      time of the Flood.  Second, the parallels to the "party's" response
      and rescue efforts are there, but "poor" is an argument that many
      African-Americans at that time did not agree with.  The severance of
      the bonds between African-Americans and the Republican party resulted
      from the failure of Hoover, while President in the opening years of
      the Great Depression, to make good on the promises for social and
      economic reform that he made to "moderate" Black leaders who he
      worked with while in charge of the relief efforts in 1927.

      Initially the relief efforts fell to the local and state authorities,
      whose Jim Crow society was thrust into the national spotlight by the
      disaster.  Hoover was sent to the region by Coolidge in large part
      because of the outcry about the treatment of Black flood victims in
      the national African-American press that had spread to the northern
      White press and its increasingly guilt-ridden readership.  He took
      charge -- and carefully cultivated the image in the national media
      that he was in charge -- of coordinating the relief efforts of the
      Red Cross and the inflow of donations from around the country, the
      response by the Corps of Engineers, and the various state National
      Guards.  He also formed the Colored Advisory Commission to
      investigate charges of human rights violations and brought a halt to
      the most egregious of those, although he had to make promises he
      later could not keep in order to insure that the CAC's report was
      toned down.  Hoover emerged from the crisis as a national hero, and,
      with the support of a large segment of the African-American
      electorate in the north, he rode that wave of popular perception into
      the White House.  It's all there in Barry for you to read.  He does
      far more than "touch" on the subject; it is a major theme of the book
      ... and has nothing, by the way, to do with his coverage of New
      Orleans, whose business community and Senatorial delegation pressured
      a hapless governor into supporting their demands to the Corps of
      Engineers to dynamite a levee BELOW the city and destroy the
      communities in two entire parishes merely to alleviate completely
      unfounded fears that the levee above the city would break.

      The key difference between then and now is that then, a president
      whose detachment was -- and still is - legendary immediately
      recognized the need to send a charismatic leader (Hoover, "The Great
      Engineer") to take charge of a deteriorating situation and reverse
      the negative course of public opinion toward his administration.
      Just the opposite has occurred in 2005.

      As to the federal government's response to Katrina, I second Ken
      Cousins' recommendation for a comparative analysis, but with the
      added recommendation that it be prefaced by a civics lesson on the
      meaning of the word "federal" as it relates to our system of
      government and to the approach to planning, overseeing, and funding
      levee construction and maintenance that was established after the
      1927 Flood and pertains to this day.

      Vagel Keller, Ph.D.
      Technology and the Environment
      Pittsburgh, PA

      "I am a Republican when my conscience will endure it."
      Jos. T. Rothrock, PA Commissioner of Forests, 1895


      --

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 15:31:21 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: courses featuring New Orleans disaster

      From: "Charles Mitchell" <cmitchell@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 3:04 PM
      Subject: courses featuring New Orleans disaster


      Colleagues:

      We are in the processs of starting a new, multi-disciplinary, year-long
      Freshman seminar sequence this year.  The winter course, titled Order and
      Chaos, will focus on the search for order and and the persistence of chaos
      in three areas over a broad historical framework: efforts to understand and
      control the self, efforts to understand and control social interactions
      among selves, and efforts to understand and control "nature."  Sadly, the
      New Orleans disaster has now become the final, capstone unit of that course.

      Charlie Mitchell
      Associate Professor, American Studies
      Elmira College
      One Park Place
      Elmira, NY 14901

      607-735-1937

      cmitchell@...

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 15:57:43 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: courses featuring New Orleans disaster

      From: "Henderson ,Martha" <MHenders@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 3:37 PM
      Subject: RE: courses featuring New Orleans disaster


      Betsy,
      We are at work on Katrina classes at Evergreen State. There will be one
      class on class/race/environment and hopefully a second on environmental
      history/physical geography/Louisiana/comparative natural
      disasters/earthquakes in the local region.
      These classes will be taught in the spring.

      Are people willing to share ideas and resources?

      Best,
      Martha

      Martha Henderson, Ph.D.
      Member of the Faculty, Professor of Geography
      The Evergreen State College
      Lab II 2264
      Olympia, WA 98505
      360 867 6841

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 15:58:34 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: Boston Environmental History Seminar Series

      From: "Cherylinne Pina" <cpina@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 3:33 PM
      Subject: Boston Environmental History Seminar Series


      The Massachusetts Historical Society announces the first event in its
      2005-2006 season of the Environmental History Seminars.

      Tuesday, September 20, 2005

      William Leavenworth, University of New Hampshire

      "From Resource to Commodity: A Reliable Way to Exhaust Self-Renewing
      Ecosystems-The Example of the Nineteenth-Century New England Fisheries"

      All seminars take place at the society, 1154 Boylston St., Boston, MA 02215,
      commencing at 5:15 PM.  After a statement by William Leavenworth and comment
      by Professor Anthony Penna the floor will be open to a general discussion of
      the presentation.


      Afterwards, the Society will serve a light buffet supper. Reservations are
      suggested but not required to attend the seminar, but are required to attend
      the supper so that numbers may be given to the caterer.

      The event is free and open to the public.  There is a charge to subscribe to
      the papers for the season.  To receive the papers by post, please send a
      check to the society at the contact information below for $25. To receive
      papers by a username and password which allows access to a secure page on
      our website where the papers may be downloaded in PDF format, please send
      $15. Please mark your check with the name of the seminar you are subscribing
      and address it to the contact information, which appears below. Please also
      note the society also hosts two other seminars, Early American History, and
      Immigration and Urban History. For information on those seminars, please
      note the contact information below.

      In the event inclement weather seems likely, please do not hesitate to call
      to find out if the event is going forward or has been postponed.

      We look forward to seeing you at the seminars.

      Cherylinne Pina
      Administrative Assistant
      (617) 646-0513
      cpina@...

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 16:51:49 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: Mumbai and New Orleans

      Mumbai and New OrleansFrom: Lauren Nauta
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 4:24 PM
      Subject: Mumbai and New Orleans


      The situation in New Orleans is incredibly tragic and upsetting.  It's also part of a global story of environment, race, and class inequality, not a strictly American one.  Despite frequent references to the tsunami, little has been heard about a flooding disaster that happened just over a month ago in Mumbai, and from which people continue to die.  I'm sure there are countless other examples, and I'm in no way trying to compare the severity of disasters in terms of the cost of human life and suffering, as both are extremely tragic in their own right.  Rather, I'm drawing attention to this because it has some striking parallels to the New Orleans situation, with global warming, the destruction of wetlands for development, the lack of spending on government infrastructure and support, and class inequalities at the fore.  Hope it is of interest.


      http://www.flonnet.com/fl2217/stories/20050826006000400.htm


      best,
      Lauren Nauta
      Department of History
      University of Pennsylvania/North Carolina State University
      lnauta@...

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 16:58:13 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: Racism and Katrina

      From: "Morris, Christopher" <morris@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 4:47 PM
      Subject: RE: Racism and Katrina


      I'm writing a book on the social/environmental history of the Lower
      Mississippi Valley over the last 500 years, and New Orleans figures
      prominently, as you can imagine. I won't weight into this debate because
      I've already had my say elsewhere, but I will point those interested to my
      article at the History News Network. There are some others there that are
      relevant to the debate over history, race, and Hurricane Katrina.

      The link for my piece is:  http://hnn.us/articles/15163.html

      Chris Morris
      morris@...

      ------------------------------

      Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2005 17:03:42 -0400
      From:    Melissa Wiedenfeld <melissa@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU>
      Subject: courses featuring New Orleans disaster

      From: Christine Rosen=20
      Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2005 5:00 PM
      Subject: Re: courses featuring New Orleans disaster


      At the risk of sounding self serving, I'd like to suggest that those of =
      you interested in the "how did we let this happen?" and the "opportunity =
      and challenges of rebuilding cities after disasters" dimensions of this =
      subject take a look at my book, The Limits of Power: Great Fires and the =
      Process of City Growth in America (Cambridge University Press 1986).  =
      Admittedly, the focus is different - the response to great fires in 19th =
      century and early 20th century cities rather than a great Hurricane and =
      flood --  but the political, economic, and physical city planning =
      dynamics are similar.  I develop a conceptual framework for thinking =
      about the factors that stopped people in the 19th century from taking =
      the actions needed to protect their cities against great fires, as well =
      as case studies of how the people of Chicago, Boston and Baltimore =
      responded when disaster finally, perhaps inevitably struck.   Cambridge =
      University Press followed an awful strategy of relentlessly raising the =
      price of the book, to absurdly high levels,  but, I'm happy to say, =
      finally brought it out in paperback at a more manageable price.  Or you =
      might find a section in it that raises the sort of questions you are =
      interested in having your class discuss that you can photocopy for your =
      students.=20

      Chris Rosen=20
      University of California Berkeley


      =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
      =3D=3D=3D
      Christine Rosen

      Associate Professor
      Business and Public Policy
      Haas School of Business #1900
      University of California=20
      Berkeley, CA    94720-1900

      Office:  510 - 642-8695  =20
      FAX: 510 - 642-4700
      crosen@...=20

      ------------------------------

      End of H-ENVIRONMENT Digest - 2 Sep 2005 to 6 Sep 2005 (#2005-138)
      ******************************************************************
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