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Fwd: [SCLPConsCom] Fixing a fat nation...through land use

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  • irvin dawid
    perhaps of some interest... Please read the Washington Monthly article by clicking on the URL below Fixing a Fat Nation from Washington Monthly
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 11, 2002
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      perhaps of some interest...

      Please read the Washington Monthly article by clicking on the URL below

      Fixing a Fat Nation from Washington Monthly
      http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/features/2001/0112.farley.cohen.html

      I received this email from Gladwyn, a major bike and ped activisit in SJ.

      It's a rather long article, and the relevant excerpt is pasted below, found
      on page 12 of 16 (the font is large - it's not really that long an article)

      Irv...

      Building recreational bikeways and walking paths makes it easier for people
      to exercise, but if we really want to make physical activity routine, those
      paths and trails need to go somewhere useful---such as a store, school, or
      workplace. That means creating more densely built mixed-use neighborhoods
      which integrate residential and commercial real estate.

      The benefits of this kind of design are already well documented. Studies
      show that people living in the suburbs, whose neighborhoods are typically
      less dense than urban areas, drive twice as far and walk and cycle one-third
      as often as their city counterparts. In 1994, a San Francisco study found
      that residents of traditional neighborhoods which had a mix of residential
      and commercial uses made 16 percent of their journeys by bike or on foot,
      whereas people who lived in the suburbs walked or biked only 10 percent
      thereof. A Seattle study found that the activity breakdown could even be
      tied to the age of one's neighborhood. People who lived in neighborhoods
      built before 1947 went out on foot or bike more than three times every two
      days. People in developments created after 1977 (just about the time the
      obesity epidemic took off) dispensed with their cars just one-third as
      often.

      --------------------------------
      The next paragraph is very interesting - it deals with building design -
      specifically, where the stairs are located!
      Usually we thing of 'green building' issues in terms of design, and other
      related energy issues - here the slant is to get people to walk/climb rather
      that use the elevator - for health reasons, not energy conservation reasons!

      However, the 2 are closely related - one of the conclusions of the article
      is that rather than focusing on metabolic reasons for obesity and other
      health problems, we need to look at our environment - so you see, this
      really is right up our alley.



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