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Re: Sealing deck hardware fastener holes.

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  • m_kanzler@yahoo.com
    I have a set of forstner bits, but that s extra work. What I m thinking is if I can get epoxy or polyester resin to wick into the plywood deck core (as water
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 2004
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      I have a set of forstner bits, but that's extra work.

      What I'm thinking is if I can get epoxy or polyester
      resin to wick into the plywood deck core (as water
      would in the case of a leak) I end up with almost the
      same thing. The plywood acts as a much stronger filler
      because of the fibrous grain in it. I would expect
      it to be stronger than the 3/4" epoxy "plug" that results
      from the other method. I had considered the other method,
      but I also need to save some time since I'm thinking
      if I fix it up and sell it I can make a bit of money...
      Then fix up the SJ-24, and put it on the market for
      a price that (combined with the Cal-25 funds) will
      allow me to buy a Santa Cruz 27 (I doubt I'll ever be
      able to afford an Olsen 30... at least not as a cash
      purchase).

      Dr Rot makes an epoxy that wicks really far, probably
      too far (theough on a Cal-25 weight is not much of
      an issue because it's heavy to begin with).

      I've heard that Polyester Resin thinned with Xylene
      or Xylol wicks quite well too.

      I also need to spend some time sailing the SJ-24 first.
      I want to see how we end up using it to decide if
      a Santa Cruz 27 or a Catalina 27 makes more sense
      for the type of sailing we do. Or even a San Juan 7.7
      or something similar that falls between the racing and
      cruising extremes. Next year I hope to start racing
      with my family. I'm crewing on a Synergy 1000, which
      is exciting, but it is time I'm not spending with my
      family, so I will eventually have to move on to sailing
      our boat more. The crewing does help learn local waters
      and how the races are conducted.

      Saturday there's a race that has a history of being
      either wild and fast or long and slow (15 hours).
      I still have to figure out how to stay warm.

      --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, gc138@a... wrote:
      >
      > In a message dated 11/30/2004 2:41:34 P.M. Central Standard Time,
      > m_kanzler@y... writes:
      >
      > I also want to seal the deck
      > core around the holes for hardware fasteners by impregnating
      > the wood core with thinned epoxy
      >
      >
      > The ultimate best way to do this is not to do it with thinned epoxy.
      > Using a forstener bit of anywhere from 1/2 to 3/4,first oversize
      the
      > mounting bolt holes. Be careful not to penetrate through to the
      cabin. The forstners
      > are are flat bits made especially for such a type hole. Fill the
      holes with
      > a thickened resin. After curing, you drill bolt holes in the middle
      of each
      > for the hardware. This way you end up with an area that will not
      wick moisture
      > to the core in case of a leak but also an area that will resist
      crushing.
      > This is a very easy thing to do and makes for a very solid mount.
      For this kind
      > of job I think a cheap polyester resin is perfectly acceptable.
      (Yes even
      > Bondo). Thicken with 404 (West System Fiberglass Filler) to a thick
      consistency
      > so that it will just flow into the holes. It's good to mask off
      the holes
      > before pouring epoxy in case of overfill. When drilling holes for
      bolts, you
      > might use a countersink and first and that will give an area to
      fill up with
      > whatever sealer you use and as you tighten down the bolts, you
      will get a nice
      > little o-ring around the bolt as the goop is pushed into the v
      shaped
      > countersink. Don't button it up tight right away, but let the
      sealant setup a little
      > (but don't let it cure) and then button it up.
      > This is a very proper way to mount hardware that most will not find
      time for
      > but I prefer it myself for my own boat.
      > George #18 Spaghetti
    • pjacobs55
      Marc: Nice looking trailer ... and the boat looks pretty good too! I think you got a great deal. One word of advice: take what you need from the boat and pass
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 1, 2004
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        Marc: Nice looking trailer ... and the boat looks pretty good too! I
        think you got a great deal. One word of advice: take what you need
        from the boat and pass it forward. You'll end up with a load of
        goodies, a free trailer, and, most important of all, only one project
        to play with. I've discovered the amount of time one can devote to
        any given project is inversley proportional to the number of projects
        you have on the go!

        Peter
        SJ24 #178 'Adios'


        --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, m_kanzler@y... wrote, in part:
        >
        > I had been looking for a trailer for the San Juan 24
        > for quite some time. A new trailer would cost around
        > $3000, so I was trying to find a used one, even if
        > I had to get one for a large power boat and add the
        > support structure for a keelboat.
      • Dave Brezina
        Having learned from skimping on oversize drilling/filling/redrilling that you risk water penetration into the balsa core, I recommend doing the extra work. I
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 2, 2004
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          Having learned from skimping on oversize drilling/filling/redrilling
          that you risk water penetration into the balsa core, I recommend doing
          the extra work.
          I don't know that a Forstner bit and non-penetrating the liner is a
          necessary step. Just drill a bit over with a regular bit (3/8 or 7/16
          for a 1/4" fastener, maybe) and use duct tape on the inside. Then
          just fill it with epoxy and let it cure. Drill the right size holes,
          bed well and things should be fine.

          Dave Brezina
          Scorpion
          Chicago

          --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, m_kanzler@y... wrote:
          >
          > I have a set of forstner bits, but that's extra work.
          >
          > What I'm thinking is if I can get epoxy or polyester
          > resin to wick into the plywood deck core (as water
          > would in the case of a leak) I end up with almost the
          > same thing. The plywood acts as a much stronger filler
          > because of the fibrous grain in it. I would expect
          > it to be stronger than the 3/4" epoxy "plug" that results
          > from the other method. I had considered the other method,
          > but I also need to save some time since I'm thinking
          > if I fix it up and sell it I can make a bit of money...
          > Then fix up the SJ-24, and put it on the market for
          > a price that (combined with the Cal-25 funds) will
          > allow me to buy a Santa Cruz 27 (I doubt I'll ever be
          > able to afford an Olsen 30... at least not as a cash
          > purchase).
          >
          > Dr Rot makes an epoxy that wicks really far, probably
          > too far (theough on a Cal-25 weight is not much of
          > an issue because it's heavy to begin with).
          >
          > I've heard that Polyester Resin thinned with Xylene
          > or Xylol wicks quite well too.
          >
          > I also need to spend some time sailing the SJ-24 first.
          > I want to see how we end up using it to decide if
          > a Santa Cruz 27 or a Catalina 27 makes more sense
          > for the type of sailing we do. Or even a San Juan 7.7
          > or something similar that falls between the racing and
          > cruising extremes. Next year I hope to start racing
          > with my family. I'm crewing on a Synergy 1000, which
          > is exciting, but it is time I'm not spending with my
          > family, so I will eventually have to move on to sailing
          > our boat more. The crewing does help learn local waters
          > and how the races are conducted.
          >
          > Saturday there's a race that has a history of being
          > either wild and fast or long and slow (15 hours).
          > I still have to figure out how to stay warm.
          >
          > --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, gc138@a... wrote:
          > >
          > > In a message dated 11/30/2004 2:41:34 P.M. Central Standard Time,
          > > m_kanzler@y... writes:
          > >
          > > I also want to seal the deck
          > > core around the holes for hardware fasteners by impregnating
          > > the wood core with thinned epoxy
          > >
          > >
          > > The ultimate best way to do this is not to do it with thinned epoxy.
          > > Using a forstener bit of anywhere from 1/2 to 3/4,first oversize
          > the
          > > mounting bolt holes. Be careful not to penetrate through to the
          > cabin. The forstners
          > > are are flat bits made especially for such a type hole. Fill the
          > holes with
          > > a thickened resin. After curing, you drill bolt holes in the middle
          > of each
          > > for the hardware. This way you end up with an area that will not
          > wick moisture
          > > to the core in case of a leak but also an area that will resist
          > crushing.
          > > This is a very easy thing to do and makes for a very solid mount.
          > For this kind
          > > of job I think a cheap polyester resin is perfectly acceptable.
          > (Yes even
          > > Bondo). Thicken with 404 (West System Fiberglass Filler) to a thick
          > consistency
          > > so that it will just flow into the holes. It's good to mask off
          > the holes
          > > before pouring epoxy in case of overfill. When drilling holes for
          > bolts, you
          > > might use a countersink and first and that will give an area to
          > fill up with
          > > whatever sealer you use and as you tighten down the bolts, you
          > will get a nice
          > > little o-ring around the bolt as the goop is pushed into the v
          > shaped
          > > countersink. Don't button it up tight right away, but let the
          > sealant setup a little
          > > (but don't let it cure) and then button it up.
          > > This is a very proper way to mount hardware that most will not find
          > time for
          > > but I prefer it myself for my own boat.
          > > George #18 Spaghetti
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