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Re: Resealing windows

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  • Dave Brezina
    The other obvious one is WD-40. My boat had been on the ocean for 10 - 15 years before coming to freshwater. All the stainless screws/bolts in the aluminum
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2004
      The other obvious one is WD-40. My boat had been on the ocean for 10
      - 15 years before coming to freshwater. All the stainless
      screws/bolts in the aluminum have galvanic corrosion. When I took out
      the leaky window to port, I was amazed that I didn't turn off some of
      the screws. I cleaned them up and bedded them in anti-seize compound,
      but haven't tackled the starboard side yet. Shoot the WD-40 in and
      let it soak to try to loosen the things up.

      Dave Brezina

      --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Sims" <Bill-Sims@c...> wrote:
      > List,
      >
      > Can't bring myself to call them ports--3 decades of tradition to
      overcome! Reminds me, a saying that's been around a long time: "The
      Navy-200 years of tradition unimpeded by progress".
      >
      > Anyway, yesterday I started to prep the templates for some bluewater
      windows that would have an overlap of about 2 inches, as has been
      recommended by some list members. Found very quickly a problem: the
      top edge would have to be notched for the traveler, and most of the
      bottom edge for the forward fairlead track. Looks like I'll go back
      to the original design.
      >
      > Have been to the files, and saw a posting about gaskets. Any other
      advice before I start this project? Besides use a power tool: years
      ago I got "tennis elbow" using a Phillips screwdriver to remove the
      window frames.
      >
      > Bill Sims
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gc138@aol.com
      Dave - What is anti-sieze compound and does it seal the screws from corrosion? George #18 Spaghetti [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2004
        Dave - What is anti-sieze compound and does it seal the screws from
        corrosion?
        George #18 "Spaghetti"


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • summersdawn1
        Something to keep in mind - some plastics react with some caulking compounds. I m not sure if lexan is prone to this or not, but I do know that acrylic
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 2, 2004
          Something to keep in mind - some plastics react with some caulking
          compounds. I'm not sure if lexan is prone to this or not, but I do
          know that acrylic (Plexi-glass) is. Plexi-glass and polyurethanes
          such as sikaflex don't mix, and will cause "crazing". When you buy
          your lexan, ask what they recommend for caulking.

          Rick

          --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Sims" <Bill-Sims@c...> wrote:
          > List,
          >
          > Can't bring myself to call them ports--3 decades of tradition to
          overcome! Reminds me, a saying that's been around a long time: "The
          Navy-200 years of tradition unimpeded by progress".
          >
          > Anyway, yesterday I started to prep the templates for some
          bluewater windows that would have an overlap of about 2 inches, as
          has been recommended by some list members. Found very quickly a
          problem: the top edge would have to be notched for the traveler, and
          most of the bottom edge for the forward fairlead track. Looks like
          I'll go back to the original design.
          >
          > Have been to the files, and saw a posting about gaskets. Any other
          advice before I start this project? Besides use a power tool: years
          ago I got "tennis elbow" using a Phillips screwdriver to remove the
          window frames.
          >
          > Bill Sims
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • gc138@aol.com
          I am strong on the GOOP products. They dry clear and are paintable, stay flexible but quite firmly adhere. It is rubber based and should not have problems with
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 2, 2004
            I am strong on the GOOP products. They dry clear and are paintable, stay
            flexible but quite firmly adhere. It is rubber based and should not have problems
            with plastics. There is one especially for marine applications called Marine
            Goop that specifically mentions sealing boat windows and such. See your local
            Home Depot or Lowe's
            George #18 "Spaghetti"


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Graeme Jannaway
            Bill, You might want to have a look at Good Old Boat, January/February 2004, Issue 34, page 63-64, before you start. The article is called Armored Portlights,
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
              Bill,
              You might want to have a look at Good Old Boat, January/February 2004,
              Issue 34, page 63-64, before you start.

              The article is called Armored Portlights, by John Karklins. A little
              teak (or starboard) spacer will allow the installation of 1/2" to 3/4"
              Lexan, Plexiglas, etc. in the standard openings. The frame is
              through-bolted with 1/4" bolts, so the whole assembly looks bullet-proof.

              One problem that the author mentions is that polycarbonate (Lexan)
              turns milky with exposure to UV. Have a look at http://www.wps.on.ca/
              They talk about the virtues of acrylic vs. polycarbonate and mention
              that there are UV stabilized versions of polycarbonate available.

              Graeme
              Matta II #318
              --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Sims" <Bill-Sims@c...> wrote:
              >
              > Anyway, yesterday I started to prep the templates for some bluewater
              windows that would have an overlap of about 2 inches, as has been
              recommended by some list members. Found very quickly a problem: the
              top edge would have to be notched for the traveler, and most of the
              bottom edge for the forward fairlead track. Looks like I'll go back
              to the original design.
              >
              > Have been to the files, and saw a posting about gaskets. Any other
              advice before I start this project? Besides use a power tool: years
              ago I got "tennis elbow" using a Phillips screwdriver to remove the
              window frames.
              >
              > Bill Sims
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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