Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: best outboards?

Expand Messages
  • richwill485
    Tim: I also have a Honda 9.9. It allows me to motor at a comfortable speed just above idle and the Forward and Reverse is handy. But its 98 Lbs. is too heavy
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
      Tim:

      I also have a Honda 9.9. It allows me to motor at a comfortable speed
      just above idle and the Forward and Reverse is handy. But its 98 Lbs.
      is too heavy for racing. I'm looking for a used Nissan 2.5 (28 Lbs.) A
      lighter motor might reduce the water coming in the cockpit drains, but
      the big issue is heeling. We always use the scupper plugs once away
      from the dock. Once heeled over, you can get 4 to 6 inches of water in
      the cockpit without them. We remove them when moored to let rain
      water out. If you are sailing in Big Waves, you might have to remove
      them if you ship more than a little water from an errant wave.

      Richard Williams
      *******************

      --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, "tim_sooke" <pacificcanoebase@s...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi All
      > Currently using a honda 9.9 and find it heavy, very heavy. The
      > cockpit drains allow alot of water into the cockpit! Does everyone
      > plug the drains when in normal sailing or will a lighter motor make
      > things manageable? What is the voice of experience?
      > Thanks
      > Tim
    • gc138@aol.com
      Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower is necessary to overcome a certain amount of current flow? I guess another way of asking that is a
      Message 2 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
        Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower is necessary to overcome a certain amount of current flow? I guess another way of asking that is a formula to determine "how much hp = how fast on the SJ24".
        In my early years I remember sailing on an 18' Crosby Seagull in the Cape Cod Canal and being swept backwards by a tidals current and almost getting in real trouble. Our engine was to small and the current was around 4 to 5 knots as I remember. When I buy a motor, I may do the river systems in the east half of the country and would like to be able to handle a 5 knot current at least without buying a 9.9.
        Georeg #18 Spaghetti
      • L Hill
        Out here on the left coast the number one thing you find out is that there is nothing that can replace a good anchor. have entered the columbia bar with strong
        Message 3 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
          Out here on the left coast the number one thing you
          find out is that there is nothing that can replace a
          good anchor. have entered the columbia bar with strong
          ebb and with the large motor running full we simply
          stood still for three hours. anchor rollee was broke,
          windlass would not operate. of course if the skipper
          had let his crew know the bow roller was crud his crew
          would of strongly advised we wait until slack to
          enter. we were fortunate not to met with disaster.
          although it does seem strange to several inland
          sailor, a good anchor is most often the best motor you
          will ever possess. to your other question there has
          been in the archives mention made of how to figure
          hull speed and what horsepower it takes to get you
          there. if memory serves right the sj24 is best suited
          for a 8 hp but was perhaps designed overall for a 4 hp

          --- gc138@... wrote:

          > Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower
          > is necessary to
          > overcome a certain amount of current flow? I guess
          > another way of asking that is a
          > formula to determine "how much hp = how fast on the
          > SJ24".
          > In my early years I remember sailing on an 18'
          > Crosby Seagull in the Cape
          > Cod Canal and being swept backwards by a tidals
          > current and almost getting in
          > real trouble. Our engine was to small and the
          > current was around 4 to 5 knots
          > as I remember. When I buy a motor, I may do the
          > river systems in the east
          > half of the country and would like to be able to
          > handle a 5 knot current at
          > least without buying a 9.9.
          > Georeg #18 Spaghetti
          >


          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          http://mail.yahoo.com
        • richwill485
          George: Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower is necessary to overcome a certain amount of current flow? Yes, but there are too many variables
          Message 4 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
            George:

            "Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower is necessary to
            overcome a certain amount of current flow?"
            Yes, but there are too many variables to make it really useful.

            "how much hp = how fast on the SJ24"?
            Slightly simpler because now the weight and hull shape are known, but
            still too messy.

            I was curious about a rule that I found on one of the PHRF Web Pages
            last Summer; "An Aux Engine (motor) sufficient to power the boat at
            90% of "Rated Hull Speed". My Honda 9.9 is several years old, but in
            very good condition and recently serviced. So, on a calm morning, flat
            water on a lake at 8,300 ft ASL, with bare polls, I slowly worked it
            up to full throttle -- bingo, about 5 1/4 kts. The Rated Hull Speed of
            the SJ 24 is 5.9 kts.
            See:(http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/2358/h_design_tips/h05.html
            90% of 5.9 is about 5.3 kts. So, I would need a 9.9 to be legal?!?!
            Dose anyone believe that??

            If you take into account that my bottom, keel and rudder are in pretty
            bad shape and the motor, at 8,300 ft ASL, is very likely producing
            less than 7 to 8 hp (fuel, elevation, age, etc.); under perfect
            conditions I might get 6 to 7 kts with a new Honda 9.9. That suggests
            that, again under perfect conditions, a 7 or 7.5 hp motor would move
            an SJ 24 at Sea Level at more than 5 kts. A big issue is that the
            relationships are non-linear; i.e. a 1 kt increase from 1 to 2 kts is
            far easier that a 1 kt increase from 5 to 6 kts.

            Its that "Perfect Condition" requirement that causes a problem.

            Richard Williams



            --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, gc138@a... wrote:
            > Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower is necessary to
            > overcome a certain amount of current flow? I guess another way of
            asking that is a
            > formula to determine "how much hp = how fast on the SJ24".
            > In my early years I remember sailing on an 18' Crosby Seagull in the
            Cape
            > Cod Canal and being swept backwards by a tidals current and almost
            getting in
            > real trouble. Our engine was to small and the current was around 4
            to 5 knots
            > as I remember. When I buy a motor, I may do the river systems in the
            east
            > half of the country and would like to be able to handle a 5 knot
            current at
            > least without buying a 9.9.
            > Georeg #18 Spaghetti
          • Tim Stokes
            I don t think any size outboard will drive a SJ24 at 7 knots. Hull speed, after all, is 5.9 k. Allowing for a little variability in the formula due to
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
              I don't think any size outboard will drive a SJ24 at 7 knots. Hull
              speed, after all, is 5.9 k.
              Allowing for a little variability in the formula due to overhangs,
              etc., 6.2 k. would seem to
              be about the max. All of which raises a question about the earlier
              poster who wished to
              motor against a 5 k. adverse current: how many folks want to spend
              time moving at one
              knot over the bottom?

              --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, "richwill485" <Rich@a...> wrote:
              >
              > George:
              >
              > "Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower is necessary
              to
              > overcome a certain amount of current flow?"
              > Yes, but there are too many variables to make it really useful.
              >
              > "how much hp = how fast on the SJ24"?
              > Slightly simpler because now the weight and hull shape are known,
              but
              > still too messy.
              >
              > I was curious about a rule that I found on one of the PHRF Web Pages
              > last Summer; "An Aux Engine (motor) sufficient to power the boat at
              > 90% of "Rated Hull Speed". My Honda 9.9 is several years old, but
              in
              > very good condition and recently serviced. So, on a calm morning,
              flat
              > water on a lake at 8,300 ft ASL, with bare polls, I slowly worked it
              > up to full throttle -- bingo, about 5 1/4 kts. The Rated Hull Speed
              of
              > the SJ 24 is 5.9 kts.
              > See:(http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/2358/h_design_tips/h05.html
              > 90% of 5.9 is about 5.3 kts. So, I would need a 9.9 to be legal?!?!
              > Dose anyone believe that??
              >
              > If you take into account that my bottom, keel and rudder are in
              pretty
              > bad shape and the motor, at 8,300 ft ASL, is very likely producing
              > less than 7 to 8 hp (fuel, elevation, age, etc.); under perfect
              > conditions I might get 6 to 7 kts with a new Honda 9.9. That
              suggests
              > that, again under perfect conditions, a 7 or 7.5 hp motor would move
              > an SJ 24 at Sea Level at more than 5 kts. A big issue is that the
              > relationships are non-linear; i.e. a 1 kt increase from 1 to 2 kts
              is
              > far easier that a 1 kt increase from 5 to 6 kts.
              >
              > Its that "Perfect Condition" requirement that causes a problem.
              >
              > Richard Williams
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, gc138@a... wrote:
              > > Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower is necessary
              to
              > > overcome a certain amount of current flow? I guess another way of
              > asking that is a
              > > formula to determine "how much hp = how fast on the SJ24".
              > > In my early years I remember sailing on an 18' Crosby Seagull in
              the
              > Cape
              > > Cod Canal and being swept backwards by a tidals current and almost
              > getting in
              > > real trouble. Our engine was to small and the current was around 4
              > to 5 knots
              > > as I remember. When I buy a motor, I may do the river systems in
              the
              > east
              > > half of the country and would like to be able to handle a 5 knot
              > current at
              > > least without buying a 9.9.
              > > Georeg #18 Spaghetti
            • gc138@aol.com
              Rich - How do you find the weight of the 9.9 affects the trim of the boat. For a cruiser (which I intend to be) it would be nice to have a higher hp motor
              Message 6 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
                Rich - How do you find the weight of the 9.9 affects the trim of the boat. For a cruiser (which I intend to be) it would be nice to have a higher hp motor running easier rpm's than a 4 or 6hp just screaming away. I am trying to find a good combination of power/noise/weight/mpg/etc.
                Extra power not so much for fighting a current for a distance but for getting out of that occasional pickle where just a little more power............
                Also on the river system I might run into extended periods of motoring and want a quiet(er) 4 stroke. The 9.9's are heavy but could be offset by weight storage in the bow to even out trim. They are also the ones with electric start and alternators, which of course makes them heavier yet. And before someone tells me to get a houseboat, I have already thought of that and decided I like to sail better. The rivers here in middle Tennessee DO go the Great Lakes and to the Gulf of Mexico with lots of sailing lakes in between. I don't know if I'll live long enough to try one of those trips, but I would love to one day.
                George #18 Spaghhetti
              • summersdawn1
                I ve got a Yamaha 9.9 High thrust 4 stroke outboard on my San Jaun. I love it. It is more power than I need, but have found it comes in handy when bucking
                Message 7 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
                  I've got a Yamaha 9.9 High thrust 4 stroke outboard on my San Jaun.
                  I love it. It is more power than I need, but have found it comes in
                  handy when bucking through the current at some of the narrows around
                  this area - especially when towing a dinghy. For a cruising motor, I
                  would look at any small 4 stroke that has the options you want - ie
                  electric start, alternator, extra long shaft. I don't know if they
                  make 6 hp's with all that, but they certainly make 8 hp's. I don't
                  find the extra weight affects the trim much - however, I wouldn't
                  want that heavy engine on the back if I did some serious racing.

                  I have had that engine on the back for 9 years, after having traded
                  up from a smaller, lighter, noiser and less reliable 2 stroke.

                  If this engine ever goes, I would see about getting maybe an 8 hp 4
                  stroke with an extra long shaft and alternator. Electric start is
                  nice, but I could live without it.

                  With any outboard, make sure you get a high thrust propellor for it -
                  this can make a huge difference - allowing you to drive the boat
                  easily at the manufacturer's recommended RPM range.

                  Rick
                  Summer's Dawn

                  --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, gc138@a... wrote:
                  > Rich - How do you find the weight of the 9.9 affects the trim of
                  the boat.
                  > For a cruiser (which I intend to be) it would be nice to have a
                  higher hp motor
                  > running easier rpm's than a 4 or 6hp just screaming away. I am
                  trying to
                  > find a good combination of power/noise/weight/mpg/etc.
                  > Extra power not so much for fighting a current for a distance but
                  for
                  > getting out of that occasional pickle where just a little more
                  power............
                  > Also on the river system I might run into extended periods of
                  motoring and
                  > want a quiet(er) 4 stroke. The 9.9's are heavy but could be offset
                  by weight
                  > storage in the bow to even out trim. They are also the ones with
                  electric start
                  > and alternators, which of course makes them heavier yet. And
                  before someone
                  > tells me to get a houseboat, I have already thought of that and
                  decided I
                  > like to sail better. The rivers here in middle Tennessee DO go the
                  Great Lakes
                  > and to the Gulf of Mexico with lots of sailing lakes in between. I
                  don't know
                  > if I'll live long enough to try one of those trips, but I would
                  love to one
                  > day.
                  > George #18 Spaghhetti
                • richwill485
                  George: How do you find the weight of the 9.9 affects the trim of the boat. Not too bad. Its like having another 120 pounder in the cockpit. The exception is
                  Message 8 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
                    George:

                    "How do you find the weight of the 9.9 affects the trim of the boat."
                    Not too bad. Its like having another 120 pounder in the cockpit.
                    The exception is in a power boat wake -- the hobby horsing is
                    aggravated by the extra weight on the stern. For the best trim, the
                    boat likes to have all of the extra weight over the keel; in the case
                    of the swept keel, just aft of the bilge is best.

                    As for "power/noise/weight/mpg/etc." In most situations I would
                    consider the 9.9 to be over-kill. The Honda uses a remote tank; mine
                    is 3 Gal. and I went all Summer on maybe 4 or 5 gals. It is quite and
                    powerful enough to get you out of trouble. When we have to motor, just
                    above idle moves the boat at 2+ kts. All-in-all, not a bad choice if
                    you are not racing.

                    And Tim is right 7 kts would be hard to reach under any circumstances.

                    Richard Williams
                    ************************

                    --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, gc138@a... wrote:
                    > Rich - How do you find the weight of the 9.9 affects the trim of the
                    boat.
                    > For a cruiser (which I intend to be) it would be nice to have a
                    higher hp motor
                    > running easier rpm's than a 4 or 6hp just screaming away. I am
                    trying to
                    > find a good combination of power/noise/weight/mpg/etc.
                    > Extra power not so much for fighting a current for a distance but for
                    > getting out of that occasional pickle where just a little more
                    power............
                    > Also on the river system I might run into extended periods of
                    motoring and
                    > want a quiet(er) 4 stroke. The 9.9's are heavy but could be offset
                    by weight
                    > storage in the bow to even out trim. They are also the ones with
                    electric start
                    > and alternators, which of course makes them heavier yet. And before
                    someone
                    > tells me to get a houseboat, I have already thought of that and
                    decided I
                    > like to sail better. The rivers here in middle Tennessee DO go the
                    Great Lakes
                    > and to the Gulf of Mexico with lots of sailing lakes in between. I
                    don't know
                    > if I'll live long enough to try one of those trips, but I would
                    love to one
                    > day.
                    > George #18 Spaghhetti
                  • m_kanzler@yahoo.com
                    I have an 8 HP Yamaha 4-stroke, and it has more than enough power. basically, once I get to somewhere around 2/3 to 3/4 throttle, adding more barely increases
                    Message 9 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
                      I have an 8 HP Yamaha 4-stroke, and it has more than enough power.
                      basically, once I get to somewhere around 2/3 to 3/4 throttle,
                      adding more barely increases the speed, and just make the
                      boat sit lower in the water (bernoulli). The extra power is nice
                      to have when the wind gets blowing hard and the water gets rough.
                      I was out in 25 to 30 kts, and was glad to have extra power. But...
                      It weighs 88 lb, which is too heavy... I need to reinforce my transom
                      a little more (it flexes a bit with a 1/4" aluminum doubler) and get
                      a stronger motor mount (my Fulton MB1710 needs to be replaced with at
                      least a Fulton MB1820, or for reassuring strength and lifting spring
                      tension, a Garelick 79101... see links below).
                      http://www.fultonperformance.com/products.php?group=46&subgroup=47
                      http://www.parkeryamaha.com/browseproducts/Fulton-MB1710-Motor-
                      Bracket.html
                      http://www.parkeryamaha.com/browseproducts/Fulton-MB1820-Motor-
                      Bracket.HTML
                      http://www.cgedwards.com/garelick/gar1.html
                      http://makeashorterlink.com/?E1241259A

                      The current bracket is poorly designed... the two halves of the
                      scissor
                      mechanisms are only spaced about 1-1/2 inch apart. I could redesign it
                      and move them farther apart like on the MB1820 bracket, but who has
                      time?

                      By the time I add another 1/4" aluminum doubler that reaches
                      to the edges of the transom, along with the current one that
                      doesn't go all the way to the top, and a heavier motor bracket,
                      I will have added more weight than I really want to (not to
                      mention the costs involved). My real plan...

                      The one-design class rules, which can be found in our files
                      section ...
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SJ-24/files
                      Require a minimum 4 HP motor on board.

                      I bought a used 5 HP 2-stroke Tohatsu for $100, which I intend
                      to use for racing. It weighs about half of my 8HP 4-Stroke.

                      I'm going to take off my 8HP, and use the 5 HP for awhile,
                      and see how that does. In the meantime I can do a tune up
                      and maintenance on the 8 HP. If the 5 HP proves to be more
                      than adequate, I might sell the 8 HP if I can get a good
                      price.

                      If the 5 HP 2-stroke is a little underpowered and noisy, I can
                      either keep the 8 HP 4-stroke, or I might get a smaller 4-stroke.
                      The 4-strokes have more torque at lower RPM than the same HP 2-stroke
                      has, which would work well with a high pitch or larger diameter
                      (High Thrust) prop, and would make it ideal for a sailboat.

                      There is a nice 6HP Mercury 4-stroke I saw in a local Marine
                      Supplies store...Nissan & Tohatsu make a similar one. it only
                      weighs 55 Lbs, which is 33 lb less than my 8 HP Yamaha. Not
                      all 4-strokes of similar HP weigh the same... the Yamaha
                      4-stroke 6 HP weighs the same 88 Lbs as the 8 HP. But, Yamaha
                      is known to hold up well in saltwater use. Since I tie out on
                      a mooring buoy, I have no way to flush my engine with freshwater,
                      so that is a consideration... but I definitely want less weight if
                      I can arrange it somehow without sacrificing too much "Driveability"

                      The Yamaha is a great motor... starts on the second pull even
                      after the boat has sat for a couple of months (as long as
                      I get all the air out of the gas line, which I now have a trick
                      figured out to do). It has plenty of power. But if I can get around
                      $1500 for it, I can buy a smaller one that is lighter, and around
                      the same age (2001 model). I just hate to give up the corrosion
                      resistance that Yamaha is known for.

                      Anyway, that's my thoughts on motor considerations.
                    • jab6973@aol.com
                      Richard, I just have to ask. Where is 8,300 ASL? Jack
                      Message 10 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
                        Richard,

                        I just have to ask.   Where is  8,300  ASL?

                        Jack
                      • richwill485
                        Jack: We have two very big lakes in the Colorado Rocky Mountains; Lake Dillon at 9,000 Ft ASL and Lake Granby at 8,300 Ft ASL. I have an SJ 24 on the larger
                        Message 11 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
                          Jack:

                          We have two very big lakes in the Colorado Rocky Mountains;
                          Lake Dillon at 9,000 Ft ASL and Lake Granby at 8,300 Ft ASL.
                          I have an SJ 24 on the larger but slightly lower Lake Granby.

                          Web Promo from Lake Dillon:
                          First rate family Summer fun with world class sailing, boat rentals,
                          sailing instruction, racing regattas and at 9,000 feet in elevation,
                          Dillon is home for the highest yacht club in North America. (That
                          suggests that there is a higher one in the Alps.??!!?!)

                          Lake Granby IS the Head Waters of the Colorado River on the "back
                          side" of the Rocky Mountain National Park. Although the sailing season
                          is short; late May to early Oct., a small dozen World Class Ski
                          Resorts are within 90 minutes; Late Nov. to early April – Rough life
                          in the thin air well above a Mile High.

                          Richard Williams
                          ***********************
                          --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, jab6973@a... wrote:
                          > Richard,
                          >
                          > I just have to ask. Where is 8,300 ASL?
                          >
                          > Jack
                        • Buz Branch
                          Jack, not to mention Navajo lake where I keep a C&C 29 in the water and sail all winter ....never freezes and is beautiful at 6000 Buz Durango
                          Message 12 of 15 , Mar 1, 2005
                            Jack, not to mention Navajo lake where I keep a C&C 29 in the water and sail
                            all winter ....never freezes and is beautiful at 6000'Buz Durango

                            >From: "richwill485" <Rich@...>
                            >Reply-To: SJ-24@yahoogroups.com
                            >To: SJ-24@yahoogroups.com
                            >Subject: [SJ-24] Re: best outboards?
                            >Date: Wed, 02 Mar 2005 02:18:42 -0000
                            >
                            >
                            >Jack:
                            >
                            >We have two very big lakes in the Colorado Rocky Mountains;
                            >Lake Dillon at 9,000 Ft ASL and Lake Granby at 8,300 Ft ASL.
                            >I have an SJ 24 on the larger but slightly lower Lake Granby.
                            >
                            >Web Promo from Lake Dillon:
                            >First rate family Summer fun with world class sailing, boat rentals,
                            >sailing instruction, racing regattas and at 9,000 feet in elevation,
                            >Dillon is home for the highest yacht club in North America. (That
                            >suggests that there is a higher one in the Alps.??!!?!)
                            >
                            >Lake Granby IS the Head Waters of the Colorado River on the "back
                            >side" of the Rocky Mountain National Park. Although the sailing season
                            >is short; late May to early Oct., a small dozen World Class Ski
                            >Resorts are within 90 minutes; Late Nov. to early April � Rough life
                            >in the thin air well above a Mile High.
                            >
                            >Richard Williams
                            >***********************
                            >--- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, jab6973@a... wrote:
                            > > Richard,
                            > >
                            > > I just have to ask. Where is 8,300 ASL?
                            > >
                            > > Jack
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          • Dave Brezina
                            Yes, there are formulae, or at least graphs, in boat design books. There are a bunch of assumptions, and steps. They are mainly used to figure out what size
                            Message 13 of 15 , Mar 2, 2005
                              Yes, there are formulae, or at least graphs, in boat design books.
                              There are a bunch of assumptions, and steps. They are mainly used to
                              figure out what size inboard engine to put in a boat. They also
                              typically consider the hull, not windage, but under your question
                              "current" would provide an answer.

                              So, in Kinney, at pp 85 - 86 the first graph gives you lbs thrust
                              needed to overcome friction at "hull speed." On a San Juan 24, about
                              65 lbs is needed for a hull speed of 5.92 knots. The next calculation
                              is hp from that information, which comes out to 1.39. So, to maintain
                              position in a 5.92 knot current, only 1.39 hp is needed.

                              A different boat design book, Larson, has Engine power = 3 kW/ton
                              Displ. So for the SJ 24, 2.10 kw or 1.57 hp is needed.

                              These kinds of things supported my electric trolling motor experiment.
                              It worked OK in calm conditions to move Scorpion around the harbor
                              and out in the race course. Speed was about 2.25 knots. When the
                              wind was blowing 30 knots, it was hard to make any progress upwind.
                              And I didn't sail where, or in conditions requiring, the motor to have
                              excess power as a "safety factor". No cruising where weather changes
                              could force you to "outrun" anything. No adverse currents. Just nice
                              weekends or Wednesday night races, and if I couldn't sail out of
                              trouble, or back to the mooring, I didn't go out.

                              So, the SJ24 class 4hp motor is more than enough for virtually any
                              conditions. Going more than 5.92 knots would require huge hp
                              increases, and where do you need to go 5.92 knots?

                              My new 6hp 2 cycle motor was purchased based on reliability and
                              newer-motor features, and what was available at the Johnson dealer at
                              a reasonable price. The dealer is two blocks from my house, so
                              although I checked West Marine and others, geography was an important
                              factor.

                              There is no way anyone needs or can effectively use 9.9 hp. It's not
                              enough to plane, and it's more than you can use.

                              My $0.02.

                              Dave Brezina
                              Scorpion
                              Chicago



                              --- In SJ-24@yahoogroups.com, gc138@a... wrote:
                              > Is there a formula to figure out how much horsepower is necessary to
                              > overcome a certain amount of current flow? I guess another way of
                              asking that is a
                              > formula to determine "how much hp = how fast on the SJ24".
                              > In my early years I remember sailing on an 18' Crosby Seagull in the
                              Cape
                              > Cod Canal and being swept backwards by a tidals current and almost
                              getting in
                              > real trouble. Our engine was to small and the current was around 4
                              to 5 knots
                              > as I remember. When I buy a motor, I may do the river systems in the
                              east
                              > half of the country and would like to be able to handle a 5 knot
                              current at
                              > least without buying a 9.9.
                              > Georeg #18 Spaghetti
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.