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High Cholesterol Linked to Alzheimer's

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  • DJ Brook
    Yet another reason to avoid cholesterol, which is only found in animals (meat, chicken, fish) and animal products (eggs, dairy). High Cholesterol Linked to
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 5, 2009
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      Yet another reason to avoid cholesterol, which is only found in
      animals (meat, chicken, fish) and animal products (eggs, dairy).



      High Cholesterol Linked to Alzheimer's

      Study Shows High Total Cholesterol in Midlife Could Raise Risk for
      Alzheimer's Disease
      By Salynn Boyles <http://www.webmd.com/susan-boyles>
      WebMD Health News
      Reviewed by Elizabeth Klodas, MD, FACC
      <http://www.webmd.com/elizabeth-klodas>

      Aug. 4, 2009 -- Adults with even moderately elevated cholesterol
      <http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/default.htm> in their early
      to mid-40s appear to have an increased risk for Alzheimer's
      <http://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/default.htm> disease and related
      dementias decades later, a new study shows.

      Researchers followed more than 9,800 people for four decades in one of
      the largest and longest age-related dementia
      <http://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/guide/alzheimers-dementia> trials ever
      conducted.

      They found that those with high or even borderline high total
      cholesterol in their 40s had a significantly increased risk for
      developing Alzheimer's disease years later.

      "People tend to think of the brain and the heart
      <http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart> as totally separate,
      but they are not," study co-author Rachel A. Whitmer, PhD of Kaiser
      Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, Calif., tells WebMD. "We are
      learning that what is good for the heart is also good for the brain --
      and that midlife is not too soon to be thinking about risk factors for
      dementia." ...


      read more at:
      http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20090804/high-cholesterol-linked-to-alzheimers





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Patricia Tricker
      Paul Appleby is one of the researchers involved in the EPIC study at Oxford (and a long-time vegan). Patricia The most important dietary determinant of serum
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 7, 2009
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        Paul Appleby is one of the researchers involved in the EPIC study at
        Oxford (and a long-time vegan).
        Patricia

        The most important dietary determinant of serum (blood) cholesterol
        level is
        saturated fat intake (and not dietary cholesterol which is consumed in
        much
        smaller quantities). Saturated fat is found in many animal products but
        is
        also found in many processed foods including ones suitable for
        vegetarians
        and vegans thanks to the use of hydrogenated vegetable fats (biscuits
        and
        cakes are good examples). Therefore, although vegetarians and vegans
        have,
        on average, lower serum cholesterol levels than meat-eaters, veg*ns who
        have
        a diet high in saturated fats are likely to have elevated serum
        cholesterol,
        raising their risk of heart disease and, if this study is to be
        believed,
        Alzheimer's disease as well.
        Paul Appleby

        > Forwarded from SFVeg.
        > Patricia
        >
        > Yet another reason to avoid cholesterol, which is only found in
        > animals (meat, chicken, fish) and animal products (eggs, dairy).
        >
        > High Cholesterol Linked to Alzheimer's

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