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Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation | The Humane Society of the United States

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  • Neil
    Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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      Forwarding the message.

      "Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation" <blog@...> wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover {background-color:#888;color:#fff ! important;} div#emailbody table#itemcontentlist tr td div ul { list-style-type:square; padding-left:1em; } div#emailbody table#itemcontentlist tr td div blockquote { padding-left:6px; border-left: 6px solid #dadada; margin-left:1em; } div#emailbody table#itemcontentlist tr td div li { margin-bottom:1em; margin-left:1em; } table#itemcontentlist tr td a:link, table#itemcontentlist tr td a:visited, table#itemcontentlist tr td a:active { color:#000099; font-weight:bold; text-decoration:none; } img {border:none;} Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation | The Humane Society of the United States
      On the Ropes
      Posted: 05 Jan 2009 01:16 PM CST
      Two weeks ago, meat industry groups announced they’d filed a legal challenge to portions of the upgraded Downed Animal Protection Act in California, passed last year by the state legislature in the wake of our investigation into a southern California slaughter plant formerly called Hallmark/Westland. And also last week, the Montana Supreme Court rejected a legal maneuver by game farms to secure remuneration for any loss in business attributed to a 2000 statewide ballot initiative that stopped them from allowing trophy hunters to shoot captive animals on their properties. I asked Jonathan Lovvorn, our vice president and chief counsel for Animal Protection Litigation and Research, to offer his observations about these important legal cases—the meat industry case just launched, and the canned hunting case now decided.
      Along the pathway to any social reform, there are leaders—like the groups and individuals who pushed for passage of Proposition 2 in California. And there are laggards.
      But every once and again you find players who are stuck in the mud, knee-deep.
      A good case in point is the recent surprise decision by the National Meat Association (NMA) and the American Meat Institute (AMI)—two trade groups representing major packing and slaughterhouse companies—to file suit seeking to overturn key provisions of California’s newly upgraded law banning the use of sick and disabled animals in the food supply.
      These groups are taking dead aim at the law enacted in response to an HSUS investigation that exposed torment of downer cows at a southern California slaughter plant. The Hallmark/Westland plant, based in Chino, was the nation’s number two supplier of ground beef to the National School Lunch Program.

      © The HSUS
      A downed cow is shoved with a forklift at Hallmark/Westland.
      The resulting scandal over the abuse of dairy cattle at Hallmark exposed major gaps in food safety and humane handling, and probably cost the meat industry and the federal government more than $1 billion when all costs were tallied.
      According to the groups’ papers, they think California lacks the authority to protect school children from mad cow and other foodborne illness, or to prevent wanton cruelty to farm animals. They also claim that the law is “unnecessary” because many downed animals are simply tired, and “could recover with rest time.”
      Did these groups already forget the shocking images of workers using forklifts, electric prods, and high pressure water hoses to force disabled animals into the slaughter plant? Did any of these animals look like they were just a little tuckered out and needed a rest?
      Even one of the livestock industry’s own commentators decried the move, wisely noting that “victory in court will prove much more costly than the loss of an extremely small number of non-ambulatory animals... Watching two of the most influential meat industry trade associations fight and win a court battle on a legal technicality will do nothing to help restore [public] confidence.”
      And if NMA and AMI are expecting the courts to declare the California law invalid, they are likely to be disappointed.
      Two federal appeals courts have already ruled that states have the authority to ban the slaughter of certain animals (in those cases, horses rather than disabled animals) where the slaughter and sale of such animals is contrary to the state’s interest in preserving public morals and protecting public health. The U.S. Supreme Court has twice rejected requests to reconsider those rulings.
      But these animal-use groups are often slow to pick up on changing currents in the law.

      © iStockphoto

      Take the example of the Montana Supreme Court’s decision last Wednesday rejecting a legal challenge to the state’s canned hunting ban—which was enacted by voters through a ballot initiative in 2000. Canned hunt operators—people who make their living collecting fees from unethical trophy hunters who want to shoot elk and other tame animals behind a fence—challenged the law years ago. They argued the state somehow owed them financial compensation for the loss of their “right” to operate canned hunting facilities, a theory the Montana supreme court categorically rejected.
      It’s a claim we hear a lot—whether it’s the “right” to cram factory farm animals into tiny wire cages, the “right” to fight animals for gambling, or the “right” to slaughter American horses for foreign diners. Time and again, these arguments are summarily rejected by the courts.
      Indeed, every single legal challenge to an HSUS-backed animal law that has been brought in the last five years has failed.
      These animal-use groups march into the courts because they have already lost in the court of public opinion and in the nation’s legislatures, and the courts represent one last Hail Mary maneuver on their part.
      Ironically, this was traditionally the recourse of the animal protection community—shut out of the legislative and political process, and focused primarily on difficult and sometimes hopeless one-at-a-time legal challenges to laws and policies that had already been decided against our interests.
      The humane movement has proved more adept in recent years, and taken the lead in enacting humane laws, changing public opinion, and using litigation as a tool for advancing the larger social agenda.
      This noticeable inversion in position—wherein those who profit from animal cruelty and abuse are now the ones stuck filing the last-gasp legal challenges—means a lot of things for the animals and our movement. But more than anything, it’s an unmistakable sign that we are winning.



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      Enjoy life and smile.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • rojony57
      It has come to my attention that it looks like I have sent Wayne s great messages more than once. Wayne Pacelle of The Humane Society of the United States
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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        It has come to my attention that it looks like I have sent Wayne's
        great messages more than once. Wayne Pacelle of The Humane Society of
        the United States titles all of his messages the same, so the content
        is different in each message. I could send the same message more than
        once, but not this time around.

        --- In SFVeg@yahoogroups.com, Neil <rojony57@...> wrote:
        >
        > Forwarding the message.
        >
        > "Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation" <blog@...> wrote: Wayne Pacelle:
        A Humane Nation h1 a:hover {background-color:#888;color:#fff !
        important;} div#emailbody table#itemcontentlist tr td div ul {
        list-style-type:square; padding-left:1em; }
        div#emailbody table#itemcontentlist tr td div blockquote {
        padding-left:6px; border-left: 6px solid #dadada;
        margin-left:1em; } div#emailbody table#itemcontentlist tr td
        div li { margin-bottom:1em; margin-left:1em; }
        table#itemcontentlist tr td a:link, table#itemcontentlist tr td
        a:visited, table#itemcontentlist tr td a:active { color:#000099;
        font-weight:bold; text-decoration:none; } img
        {border:none;} Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation | The Humane
        Society of the United States
        > 2008: A Look Back
        > Posted: 30 Dec 2008 01:29 PM CST
        > I’ve had the privilege of being president of The HSUS for short
        of five years now. I had hoped, in taking the post, that I could
        enhance the organization's reputation as a powerful, mainstream force
        for animal protectionâ€"a force that could take on the major forms of
        institutionalized cruelty and achieve results that made a difference
        in the lives of animals.
        >
        >
        > Thanks to the support of our members and the work of our talented
        staff and board, that’s happened, and now the task is not to relent,
        but instead to continue to strengthen and grow this capability. In
        looking back at some of my blogs written in 2008, I pulled 10 of the
        most popular. I think they provide a valuable chronicle of some of the
        big picture items and controversies over the last year.
        > Here's the list:
        >
        > A Look Ahead: Obama's Ag and Interior Chiefs (Dec. 17): Reaction
        to President-elect Barack Obama's cabinet selections for Agriculture
        and Interior Secretary
        > Proposition 2: Views Fit to Print (Oct. 9): The editorial board
        of The New York Times endorses Proposition 2, the California ballot
        initiative to ban veal crates, gestation crates, and battery cages
        > Alarm Bells Over Eight Belles (May 5): A discussion of the
        problems with horse racing, following filly Eight Belles' death at the
        Kentucky Derby
        > No Downers, No Exceptions (May 20): Agriculture Secretary Ed
        Schafer announces that the USDA will implement a no-downer policy for
        cattle in the United States
        > Art, Examined (April 25): Controversy surrounds the exhibition of
        a starving street dog in a Nicaraguan art gallery
        > Uncaging the Truth (Aug. 11): Exposing the opposition to
        California's Proposition 2
        > Torture on Tape (Jan. 30): The HSUS investigation of
        Hallmark/Westland Meat Co. breaks, exposing the abuse of downed dairy
        cows at the Chino, Calif. slaughter plant
        > Safer Fate for Seals (April 15): Rebecca Aldworth, The HSUS's
        director of Canadian wildlife issues, imagines a future free of
        Canada's annual slaughter of baby harp seals
        > Puppy Mill Horrors to Hit Millions (April 2): Oprah Winfrey
        dedicates an entire hour-long program to puppy mills and the related
        issues of shelter adoptions, spay and neuter, and euthanasia
        > All Paws on Deck (June 4): The generosity and dedication of The
        HSUS's supporters shines through in response to repeated attacks from
        the U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Email Delivery powered by FeedBurner
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Enjoy life and smile.
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Mitch Cohen
        Interesting... HSUS considers Vilsack one of its top choices: hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2008/12/obama-cabinet.html Organic Consumers Assoc (OCA) thinks he d be
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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          Interesting... HSUS considers Vilsack one of its top choices:
          hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2008/12/obama-cabinet.html

          Organic Consumers Assoc (OCA) thinks he'd be terrible for Ag Secy, and has a campaign to stop his apptmt:
          www.organicconsumers.org/bytes/ob157.htm Food First concurs with OCA.

          To: sfveg@yahoogroups.com
          From: rojony57@...
          Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 00:32:04 -0800
          Subject: [SFVeg] Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation | The Humane Society of the United States




















          "Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation" wrote: ....2008: A Look Back

          Posted: 30 Dec 2008 01:29 PM CST



          ...A Look Ahead: Obama's Ag and Interior Chiefs (Dec. 17): Reaction to President-elect Barack Obama's cabinet selections for Agriculture and Interior Secretary








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