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  • Neil
    Forwarding the message Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 16, 2008
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      Bush's Toxic Changes
      Posted: 16 Dec 2008 05:52 PM CST
      In its waning days, the Bush Administration is racing against the clock to grease the skids for the factory farming industry. The Administration has always been aligned with Big Agriculture, but these new regulations are an astonishing abdication of the government’s regulatory responsibility. The Obama Administration will have to contend with these pernicious moves and plan on rolling them back to protect the public.
      In late November, the Food and Drug Administration reversed its prior regulatory commitments to bar the “extralabel” use of certain antibiotics on the nation’s billions of cows, pigs, and chickens raised for food. The term extralabel, or "off-label," refers to using drugs for purposes other than for what they were intended—such as taking an antibiotic approved to treat respiratory diseases among cows and administering the drug to chickens.
      Antibiotics are supposed to be administered to fight illness and infection. But an estimated 70 percent of the antimicrobial drugs used in the United States are fed in low doses to animals on factory farms to promote faster growth and keep the animals from getting sick in their filthy, overcrowded environment. Major medical and public health groups, including the American Medical Association, say that the rampant use of such drugs on farm animals is a prescription for fostering the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This has the potential to render antibiotics unusable in fighting human health problems.
      And just last week, the Environmental Protection Agency decided to exclude these factory farms from certain pollution regulations, including not requiring them to report dangerous levels of air pollution to the agency. Industrialized intensive animal production facilities will now be allowed to manage the enormous volumes of manure and noxious gases they produce without federal oversight or reporting responsibilities. The Baltimore Sun addressed the issue on its editorial page today.
      President-elect Barack Obama has already announced a strong team to head the EPA and other environmental positions, and dismantling these last-second giveaways to industry should be a priority.



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    • Neil
      Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 17, 2008
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        A Look Ahead: Obama's Ag and Interior Chiefs
        Posted: 17 Dec 2008 02:23 PM CST
        Today, in his regular blog "Animals & Politics," my colleague Michael Markarian posted a blog well worth reading about today's announcement by President-elect Barack Obama on his latest cabinet selections: former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack for Agriculture Secretary and current U.S. Sen. Ken Salazar from Colorado for Interior Secretary. I join in Mike's congratulations to both men on their selections, and say that we very much look forward to working with them.
        Vilsack was a top choice by The HSUS for the post, and we believe he has the smarts and experience to bring this agency into the 21st century and to confront the enormous challenges that his predecessors have largely sidestepped. But it will be a tough job, and he'll have to steel his spine for the job ahead. Vilsack clearly has the mettle to do this; as Iowa Governor, he vetoed a bill to allow the shooting of mourning doves—an act that has saved more than a million doves from target shooting in the years since and cut against the conventional wisdom about disappointing and defying the NRA and the gun lobby. USDA is a dinosaur, with animal welfare programs an odd fit within an agency that has as its core mission the promotion of agriculture, including the production of animals for meat, egg, and dairy products. USDA leaders, acting in concert with a variety of industries, have largely viewed animals as commodities, rather than living, feeling individuals, and their
        policies and enforcement actions have reflected that worldview and consistently fallen short of a responsible standard of conduct for years.
        As columnist Nicholas Kristoff wrote last week in The New York Times, the agency should be renamed the Department of Food, and move beyond its traditionally narrow focus as a promoter of agribusiness. It needs to elevate food safety, animal protection, environmental protection, and local, sustainable and organic agriculture, and think about serving 300 million American consumers, rather than just the small number of people involved in corporate agribusiness. Social critic Michael Pollan and others have been making the same points during the past few months.
        Our nation needs farmers and a thriving rural economy, and preserving that lifestyle and livelihood is vitally important. But farmers, and the sophisticated ones certainly know this, operate within a society with evolving attitudes toward agriculture, as the passage of Proposition 2 in California indicates. A good yield is not enough—agriculture must pay attention to the wishes of consumers and the norms in society that reflect a concern for the care of animals, the environment, wholesome food, and protection of family farms. The Farm Bill, in its future iterations, should provide farmers with incentives to produce in a way that promotes animal welfare, land preservation, food safety, and nutrition, instead of building the legislation around providing subsidies principally for five major commodities, with most of the money going to producers making more than $250,000 a year. Vilsack will also play a big role in energy policy, since animal agriculture is such an enormous
        contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, as well as both a major consumer and producer of energy.
        We pledge to work with him, all the while advocating to advance the broad mission of The HSUS.
        Sen. Salazar is a widely respected figure in the Senate, built partly on his years of experience as a conservative Democrat with a reputation for reaching out to Republicans. He was not a top choice at Interior for animal advocates, the environmental community, or other significant stakeholders and for that reason alone, his was a surprise choice. As Markarian writes in his blog, Salazar has a mixed record on our issues and, to some degree, on environmental protection. But I think he'll find that strong, progressive action at an agency that's been riddled with corruption and has demonstrated unhindered obedience to the desires of industry during the Bush era will earn him and President-elect Obama the loyalty of the majority of the American public. Americans treasure wildlife and the 700 million acres of public lands. It's an awesome responsibility, and we hope that Salazar will provide inspired leadership worthy of the vision that President-elect Obama has set forth in
        his policy statements and speeches.
        Here is Markarian's blog, as well.
        Obama's Animal Welfare Team
        President-elect Barack Obama announced two more Cabinet appointments today—perhaps the two most eagerly awaited appointments for animal advocates because of their relevance to the protection of domestic animals and wildlife. We congratulate former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack, the next Secretary of Agriculture, and U.S. Sen. Ken Salazar of Colorado, the next Secretary of the Interior, who were both named earlier today. We also congratulate Lisa Jackson, whose appointment was formally announced earlier in the week to head the Environmental Protection Agency. These three members of Obama’s team together will impact the lives of hundreds of millions of animals.
        Vilsack has a solid record on animal protection, and he was the top choice of HSUS and HSLF to lead the USDA, the agency that oversees our federal laws on animal welfare, humane slaughter and transport, horse protection, animal fighting, and others. Nearly 90,000 animal advocates contacted the transition team through our website, expressing how important it was to pick an animal-friendly Agriculture Secretary and recommending Vilsack as an excellent choice. The Obama Administration listened to your views, and this appointment demonstrates what an important voice animal advocates can have as a political constituency.
        As governor of Iowa, Vilsack advocated for bills to toughen the state’s penalties for animal fighting, and now he will lead the agency charged with enforcing the federal law to break up dogfighting and cockfighting rings. He stood up to the puppy mill industry and vetoed a bill in 2006 that would have weakened protections for pets by reclassifying dogs as "farm products." He also exhibited tremendous fortitude and adherence to principle when he vetoed legislation in 2001 that would have allowed the sport hunting of mourning doves for the first time in decades. Standing up to the NRA and the gun lobby in a big hunting state, he said at the time:
        The majority of Iowans do not support changing the current law to legalize dove hunting. My office has received contact from thousands of concerned Iowans regarding this issue, and my conclusion is that this policy is not right for our state at this time.
        Vilsack recognized the importance of protecting animals from cruelty and abuse, and the importance of public involvement in the decision-making process. He'll need that same principled leadership in enforcing the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act, the Animal Welfare Act, the Horse Protection Act, and other federal laws. We look forward to working with him to elevate animal protection, food safety,and protection of the environment at USDA, which has consistently subverted these important considerations and sided time and again with the knee-jerk positions of agribusiness. He'll have a big role to play in how our nation confronts puppy mills, factory farming, predator control, the use of animals in research and testing, and other practices and industries that have compromised animal welfare.
        Salazar was a surprise choice for Interior, and wasn’t one of the names pushed by animal advocates. His record on animal issues in the U.S. Senate has been mixed, scoring 0 on the Humane Scorecard for the 109th Congress, and 50 percent in the 110th Congress. He voted against legislation to ban horse slaughter in 2005, but in the current session he co-sponsored legislation to strengthen the penalties for animal fighting and signed onto a letter requesting increased funds for the adequate enforcement of animal welfare laws. He has received relatively high marks on environmental issues from the League of Conservation Voters, scoring 78 percent in the 109th Congress and 85 percent in the 110th Congress.But, again, as with animal advocates, Salazar was not on the list of preferred candidates for the environmental community. The President-elect passed over more strongly recommended candidates such as Reps. Raúl Grijalva and Jay Inslee.
        As Interior chief, Salazar will oversee the enforcement of wildlife protection laws such as the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and will have authority for wildlife management practices on millions of acres of federal lands in national parks, national wildlife refuges, and Bureau of Land Management properties. We look forward to working with him, too, and addressing the major wildlife policy issues such as protecting threatened polar bears and other species from the impacts of global warming, deploying immunocontraceptive technology to manage wild horses and burros humanely on the range, and addressing the animal welfare and public safety risks of the exotic pet trade.
        Jackson led the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, and was a leading animal advocate in the state. She rejected attempts by the NRA, Safari Club, and other trophy hunting groups to initiate a hunting season on New Jersey’s small population of black bears, and she instead implemented a comprehensive program to solve bear conflicts with humane methods such as trash management and public education. We are pleased to have such an innovative leader at the helm of EPA, and we hope to work with her on continued efforts to prioritize the use of alternatives to animals in toxicity testing, to ensure strong penalties for pollution from factory farms and dismantle the Bush Administration’s corporate giveaway that exempts them from having to report their massive toxic emissions.
        President-elect Obama has pledged to make progress for animal welfare and environmental stewardship, and we hope these appointees will prove to be an excellent team to help him meet these crucial goals. We congratulate the nominees, and look forward to working with the new Administration to confront the major challenges facing animals and the environment.



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      • Neil
        Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 19, 2008
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          Talk Back: Humane Pride
          Posted: 18 Dec 2008 03:32 PM CST
          Since I posted my blog on Monday about last week’s three major HSUS field operations, your comments have been rolling in. I wanted to share some of them today:
          I am so heartened by the work you do on behalf of all living beings. You are organized, informed, and smart about how you go about stopping cruelty and mistreatment of animals. And you make it easy for supporters to keep supporting—helping us send letters to our congressmen, helping us contact the companies who may not be doing the right thing. By helping to make our voices heard, you broaden public awareness and that inevitably leads to good action taken, and doing what's right for this earth. Thank you so much. —Jessica Keener
          Like everyone I am thrilled with the strides being made to end animal cruelty and convict those responsible. And once again I must praise the work of organizations like the HSUS who have the stomach and fortitude to focus on this work. Just reading about these crimes is difficult; I can't imagine having to keep my head and emotions in check as must be done. So thank you for your strength, all of you. Thank you so much. —Maria
          Wayne and the HSUS staff, I am so proud to sponsor you and I so much appreciate all the hard work and the perseverance that you endure on behalf of God's creatures. It is a comfort to know that through the flooding, fires, hurricanes and tornadoes, the HSUS is always there. Merry Christmas to you and all of your staff. —Brenda, Donna and our six spoiled dogs (Liza, Koko, Misa, ZZ, Tashi and Reilly)
          Wayne's post today reminds me why I pledge my fullest possible financial support to HSUS—and why I will be on my knees with gratitude the day this kind of organization is no longer needed. —Melissa Tedrowe
          The dog in the cage looks so much like my little Rosie that it just breaks my heart. She was rescued living on the streets in Dayton by the dog catcher, and later saved from being euthanized by Lil Paws Rescue. Puppy mills and dogfighting—two subjects that just make me sick. Thank goodness for the HSUS for working so hard to stop these abuses. —Chris
          Many of you have also commented on the year-end victories video that I posted last week. If you haven’t yet had a chance to watch it, be sure to find a few minutes to do so and to reflect on all of the achievements you helped to make possible for animals in 2008. Among your responses to the video:
          I just get chills watching the video and all the advances HSUS has made over the last year. It is unbelievable. I will continue to support the HSUS and its mission. —Penny Steinmeyer
          The HSUS ROCKS! What a great year indeed. Congratulations to you, your collaborators, and of course to your supporters, of which I am deeply honored to be! I am looking forward to an even brighter future for animals in 2009! Keep up all of your amazing work! —Jodi
          So much done, so much left to do. —Kathy Kirkpatrick
          And finally, after seeing Rachel Pfirrman’s note about how she’s rallying her high school club in response to The HSUS’s investigation of the Petland chain of retail stores, a number of you were inspired to share your own stories of how you’re taking action to help stop puppy mills. Among them:
          Earlier this week, I submitted a letter to an editor at the Chicago Tribune newspaper in hopes of educating the public about puppy mills. It has become apparent that one of the greatest resources people have is each other. I've learned that speaking up and spreading awareness about animal cruelty is a quick and effective way to make a difference. As people, we have the power to EFFECT CHANGE. Stand up! MAKE PEOPLE LISTEN! We can do this! Together, we can make the world a better and much safer place for ALL ANIMALS. —Victoria Maiorana
          Thank you Wayne and to all of HSUS for all the research and reporting that you do. I appreciate all the information your organization provides. I have been moved to action in my community because of the puppy mill/Petland report you released on Nov. 20 and it has changed my life. I am now a citizen with a purpose standing up against animal cruelty. Please don't give up on the cause and continue doing what you do. Yes, change comes slow but victories are celebrated by those that are determined, consistent and stay on track even during the storms. Rain is predicted tomorrow, Dec. 13, so we will get wet when do our Petland protest in Roseville, Calif. —Ena Fisher
          Thanks to all of you for offering these comments and please keep your feedback coming. If you have a question about The HSUS or one of our campaigns or programs, feel free to share that as well. This blog is as much yours as it is mine, and I'd love for you all to be a part of the dialogue.



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        • Neil
          Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 20, 2008
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            Safety Testing 2.0
            Posted: 19 Dec 2008 02:01 PM CST
            Last year, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) gave lift to the quest to end the use of animals in testing for the potential human health hazards of chemicals, drugs, and consumer products. In its report, “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century, A Vision and a Strategy,” the NAS laid out a long-term proposal for shifting largely, if not entirely, to non-animal testing methods. The new approach, based on the deliberations of an expert committee (including HSUS staff member Martin Stephens, Ph.D.), relies on modern advances in biology and technology and emphasizes human—rather than animal—biology. Some experts believe the proposed research and development could be completed within a decade, though funding from Congress and industry will be needed to advance this objective.
            Yesterday The HSUS and the Procter & Gamble Company, our partner in pursuing alternative testing methods, honored several scientists associated with the paradigm shift championed by the NAS. We bestowed two North American Alternatives Awards of $25,000 each, funded by Procter & Gamble, for outstanding scientific contributions to the advancement of alternatives to animal testing.
            Award recipient Melvin Andersen, Ph.D., of the Hamner Institute in Research Triangle Park, N.C., was a key author of the 2007 NAS report. He’s a tireless promoter of its vision and a researcher with promising ideas on translating that vision into reality.
            The other award will support the federal government’s fledgling “Tox21” program, which carries out automated, robotic, high-volume testing of chemicals. Under the leadership of Christopher Austin, M.D., of the National Human Genome Research Institute, Robert Kavlock, Ph.D., of the Environmental Protection Agency, and Raymond Tice, Ph.D., of the National Toxicology Program, Tox21 will be used to develop toxicity “signatures” for chemicals, information likely to substitute for animal testing in the future.
            The issue at hand has come a long way since animals first began to be used in routine testing decades ago. Such testing was one of the early targets of the emerging animal protection movement in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Largely as a result of such advocacy, toxicity testing emerged as the primary field for applying the “Three Rs” of replacing, reducing, and refining the use of animals.
            The drive for alternatives to animal testing made slow progress during the 1980s and early 1990s but, in the last 15 years, it appears that animal use in toxicity testing has started to fall in a meaningful way. In Great Britain, which has reasonably accurate laboratory animal use numbers, the number of animals used in toxicity testing has fallen 75 percent since 1995. In recent years, advocacy efforts have mostly switched to engagement, as The HSUS and other animal protection organizations seek to end animal testing altogether by working with progressive corporations, regulatory agencies, alternatives centers, and intergovernmental standards-setting organizations.
            We are proud to partner with Procter & Gamble for the third consecutive year in bestowing the North American Alternatives Awards. It is a symbol of our common commitment to eliminate animal testing for consumer product safety, while ensuring that marketed products are safe for consumers and the environment. Procter & Gamble has been criticized for its animal testing over the years, but when companies step up and contribute to the solution, they need to be recognized and animal advocacy groups should be prepared to acknowledge that work and shift. We are a movement that must embrace change, and not have a static view about individuals or institutions.
            We congratulate Anderson, Austin, Kavlock, and Tice for their stalwart dedication to implementing the NAS’s long-term vision that will lead to a goal we all share—ending animal testing.
            Postscript: It was exciting to learn last night that President-elect Barack Obama intends to appoint Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D., a distinguished marine ecologist, as Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. It’s a critical position within the Department of Commerce, with major responsibility for the health of oceans and ocean life, and for the enforcement of the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act. Lubchenco, like the Procter & Gamble honorees, exemplifies the creativity, innovation, and engagement with the public interest that we so prize in the American scientific community.




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          • Neil
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            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 23, 2008
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              Gray, with a Silver Lining
              Posted: 23 Dec 2008 11:02 AM CST
              I celebrate the people who go to shelters or rescue groups to adopt any homeless dog or cat. It's an act of love and kindness. But I have a special place in my heart for people who adopt senior pets. These dogs or cats may have a few flecks of gray, and may not be as frisky or fetching or as big-eyed as puppies or kittens, but they love us just the same and perhaps they need us even more. They may not stay with us as long, but that only means we need to pack a lifetime of love and affection into fewer years.

              Some weeks ago, the following story came into the blog and it's a great reminder to us all during the holiday season of the special creatures who need our help. I hope you find inspiration in this tale that May Lattanzio, a freelance writer, poet and photographer, tells.
              Off and on throughout my life, I have worked as a volunteer wildlife rehabilitator and placement volunteer for the local humane society and in private. I put up a blog and decided to help the county shelter which is high-kill, but rescue friendly, in Bay County, Fla., by putting a rotating widget in the sidebar of adoptable dogs.
              Then I saw the nameless Boston with three legs who was supposedly five years old (approximately). Her owner was incarcerated, and she was given to someone else who neglected or mistreated her so much, she was confiscated.
              And there she was. Much older than five. Maybe 500. She was scarred on her flanks. Her forehead looks like it was cleaved at one time. She trailed a long cyst sack that swung when she walked. It was heavy. She is missing a front leg. She hobbles; has lumps, bumps and warts all over. She is gray-faced.
              Maybe someone would want a special needs dog. I took her home to foster. Granny Annie is no beauty. All dogs are beautiful physically, but poor Annie isn't. But inside that scarred interior lives a shining, golden heart and endless sweetness of character. I was planning to foster her so that she would not be euthanized. Who would want her?
              It turned out that I did. To a house full of dogs and cats, she fit right in. If your heart is set on a dog, please adopt one, and don't forget the older ones who aren't pretty anymore; or the black ones who are seldom adopted because of their color. If they have special needs, they have lessons to teach you; like courage, inner strength, patience, gratitude and above all, love.



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            • Neil
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              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 23, 2008
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                Horse Slaughtergate
                Posted: 22 Dec 2008 11:25 AM CST
                Six-time Genesis Awards-winner Brad Woodard, an investigative reporter for the CBS television affiliate in Houston, is on top of the horse slaughter industry again. Last week, he aired an investigative story that reminded us of the continuing problems of slaughter, exposing again the propaganda of the Belgian companies and their allies at the center of the North American trade in horses for human consumption.
                We know of the tens of thousands of live American horses sent to slaughter in Canada and Mexico, where The HSUS has documented inhumane slaughter and treatment. From there, the meat is typically sent to Europe for human consumption.

                © Animals' Angels

                Woodard reported on that, but also the efforts of Animals' Angels to obtain federal records through the Freedom of Information Act that document the treatment of American horses destined for the slaughter plants here in the United States before they were closed in 2007 (two in Texas and one in Illinois). The records and photos show battered and beaten-up horses, and the pictures will turn your stomach, as writer Steven Long of Texas Horse Talk magazine says in the Woodard piece.
                For years, as The HSUS has pushed a ban on horse slaughter in the United States and on the export of live horses for slaughter, we've heard the canard from the American Veterinary Medical Association and groups associated with agribusiness that all was well with slaughter here in the U.S.; in fact, there are moves in several states to open horse slaughter plants here again, with the proponents relying on the argument that slaughtering is humane here in the U.S.
                But the Animals' Angels investigation shows something very different indeed, and the photos and other materials supplement the disturbing investigative footage The HSUS obtained some years ago about the cruelty of slaughter here. The fact is, wherever one looks at horse slaughter—here or abroad—it's an ugly industry. No animal should suffer this cruelty for any reason, and certainly not for the profits of a handful of Belgian companies operating in North America that supply a luxury meat market for a sliver of high-end Japanese and European consumers.
                When the new Congress convenes on Jan. 6, it will be a top priority for The HSUS to pass legislation to ban horse slaughter in the United States and to ban the export for slaughter of American horses to our neighbors to the north and south. We'll need you in that fight to get the phone lines going, especially to educate the dozens of new members of Congress who may be unfamiliar with the issue.
                Woodard is one of the nation’s best television journalists when it comes to digging deep into issues that matter for animals—a fact recognized by his collection of Genesis Awards, which are presented annually by The HSUS to honor news and entertainment media that spotlight important animal issues.









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              • Neil
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                Message 7 of 15 , Dec 25, 2008
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                  Eyes on the Sparrow
                  Posted: 24 Dec 2008 01:59 PM CST
                  Last year, The HSUS launched its Animals and Religion program—a campaign that calls upon religious people to put faith into action. All of the world's major religions speak to our responsibilities to animals, and we at The HSUS have not invented this concern, but reminded them of their own powerful traditions.

                  Since animals' lives are bound up with our lives today and throughout history, it would be wrongheaded to think that the principles of kindness and mercy would not apply to animals as well as people. In referencing Luke 2:1-20, Pastor Glenn Pease in his sermon on Christmas Animals reminds us of the central place of animals in Jesus’s birth:
                  "In His birth our Lord Jesus identified with the animal kingdom. He was born in a stable meant for the shelter of animals. He was laid in a manger meant for the feeding of animals. The first sounds baby Jesus heard could have been the sound of animals. He was first announced to the shepherds whose whole life revolved around the care, feeding, and protection of animals. The wise men, who represented the Gentile world, made their journey to worship Him on animals. They were likely camels, although horses were not impossible. Mary likely made it to Bethlehem riding on a donkey. Later in His life, Jesus was in a context where He related both to the angels and animals. Mark 1:13 says, 'He was with the wild animals, and angels attended Him.' This was during His forty days in the wilderness. Angels and animals have this in common, they are both servants of God and man. They are both a part of the Christmas story." (Read a hymn that illustrates the animals' role in the Christmas
                  story here.)

                  Among Jesus's many favorable references to animals in the New Testament, he is twice quoted (Luke 12:6, Matthew 10:29) as saying that the Lord cares for all his creatures, even those considered the "lowliest" of them: "Are not five sparrows sold for two pennies? And not one of them is forgotten before God."
                  Indeed, compassion for animals is not just an integral part of the Judeo-Christian religious tradition, but it is a tenet and teaching of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islam, too.
                  And so, as the holiday reminds us to love others and spread goodness, it is impossible for me to imagine that the abuse or neglect of animals could ever be acceptable to a merciful God.




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                • Neil
                  Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jan 6, 2009
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                    Now Showing: Animal Cruelty
                    Posted: 06 Jan 2009 04:00 PM CST
                    Adam Liptak in today’s New York Times wrote a measured piece about the legal brouhaha over a 1999 law that The HSUS and the Doris Day Animal League helped to pass to ban the commercial sale of videos depicting extreme and illegal acts of animal cruelty. The legislation—carried with great skill by Congressman Elton Gallegly, a stalwart friend to our cause—was prompted by an HSUS investigation that uncovered an underground subculture of “animal crush” videos, where women, often in high-heeled shoes, would impale and crush to death puppies, kittens and other small animals, catering to those with a fetish for this aberrant behavior. Surprisingly, we found thousands of separately produced videos available for sale on the Internet—causing untold suffering to thousands of animals.
                    Liptak notes that the Bush Administration’s Solicitor General has filed a petition for certiorari, requesting review by the U.S. Supreme Court of an appellate court’s ruling that the Cruelty Depictions Law is unconstitutional. The appeals court ruled that animal cruelty is “not a compelling state interest” and nullified the law because, according to the court, it proscribes protected speech.
                    The Solicitor General noted in his brief that First Amendment jurisprudence makes it plain that free speech guarantees are not absolute. The Supreme Court explained in Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire (1942) that “certain well-defined and narrowly limited classes of speech” do not contribute to an “essential part of any exposition of ideas, and are of such slight social value” that government may proscribe their content. The Solicitor also explained how, so far, the Court has recognized that fighting words (speech inciting imminent lawless activity), Brandenburg v. Ohio (1969); defamation, Beauharnais v. Illinois (1952); obscenity, Miller v. California (1973); child pornography, Ferber (1982); and solicitations to engage in illegal activity, United States v. Williams (2008), all are so far from the concerns actually animating the First Amendment that they are entitled to no Constitutional protection.
                    While we are staunch believers in the First Amendment here at The HSUS, we balk at the absolutism of some self-proclaimed First Amendment advocates. Some have claimed that there is a First Amendment right to advertise illegal dogfights and cockfights, and we think the law is clear that such promotions may constitutionally be criminalized. When it comes to video of illegal acts of animal torture that are inflicted solely for the purpose of selling the videos for profit, we also stand on firm terrain. Stopping animal cruelty is a compelling state interest—not only because our society values animals and their well-being, but also because people who perpetrate these acts of cruelty are often involved in other criminal behavior, including violence against people. What’s more, the peddlers of these animal snuff films are not making an argument or expressing a viewpoint—they are simply profiting from appalling animal cruelty. If the core behavior is criminal, so should the
                    commercial profit of the sale of the videotaped torment of the victims.
                    It’s quite difficult to catch dogfighters in the act, though we are getting better at sniffing out these criminals all the time. But if we can’t catch them in the act, must we stand aside as they stage dogfights for the purpose of selling thousands of videos for profit to titillate viewers with an interest in this despicable behavior? And must we allow them to victimize more dogs while they create the newest DVDs depicting their perverse and illegal form of recreation? We won’t stand by, and that’s why we lobbied for enactment of the law.
                    And when it comes to women stepping on animals for the sexual gratification of viewers, that, too, crosses any standard of decency and humanity, and here the law must speak. There is no speech present in these films, just torture. We wouldn’t allow people to sell videos of people actually abusing children or raping women, and the same legal principles are at hand with malicious acts of cruelty, which are a felony in some form in every state. The federal Cruelty Depictions Law is an essential complement to the state anti-cruelty and anti-animal fighting laws, which alone do not equip law enforcement with the tools to stamp out the national and international traffic in the videos, which are anonymously produced and staged for the sole purpose of inflicting cruelty to animals.
                    Our thanks to the Solicitor General for appealing the case, and our thanks to Congress for its overwhelming passage (unanimous in the Senate) of this law nearly a decade ago. The HSUS will muster all of its legal and political resources to argue for a reversal of the appellate court’s ruling if the Supreme Court grants review. Until the appellate court’s ill-considered opinion is remedied, I am afraid we will see more miscreants victimizing more animals. These people should find no defense in the First Amendment, especially in the era of commercial trade on the Internet.



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                  • Neil
                    Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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                      With Unwavering Resolve
                      Posted: 31 Dec 2008 11:55 AM CST
                      Winston Churchill: "When we face with a steady eye the difficulties which lie before us, we may derive new confidence from remembering those we have already overcome."

                      Wise words by which to anticipate this New Year.

                      As 2009 beckons, we understand there are mountains still to climb. Greed, selfishness, callousness, and indifference are still the core causes of animal abuse in our society, and they have deep roots in human nature.
                      Just the same, we know we can summit these peaks. The human spirit also guides us toward kindness, decency, and mercy. And these principles, throughout history, are trumping countervailing human impulses. The advance of a civil society is an unyielding force, and all of us at The HSUS—our staff and members—are propelling the advance of good in the world. Compassion and courage are at the core of our mission, and they have the power to transform our world.
                      Just listen to our opponents. Our triumphs of 2008 have truly shaken those who defend the mistreatment of animals as “the cost of doing business” in America.
                      I’m thinking, for instance, about the hirelings at the CCF who attack The HSUS as part of the group's misdirection strategy. In the wake of the passage of Prop 2, this front group for agribusiness, junk food companies, and other special interests has decided we are the number one threat to their financial backers. They’ve been pouring heaps of cash into deceptive advertising, trying to tarnish us.
                      Who are these shadowy financiers of CCF, anyway? Here’s what the organization’s website says: "Many of the companies and individuals who support the Center financially have indicated that they want anonymity as contributors." I’m sure they do. They are ashamed to try and defend the cruelties of, say, factory farming or puppy mills or seal clubbing or unnecessary laboratory testing on animals. Well, they can hide their names, but they cannot hide the ugliness of their values. Cowering in the dark corners of the misery they create, they look for diversionary arguments.
                      We will not be diverted.
                      To borrow from Churchill, we have growing confidence. Our ideals resonate with average Americans, and the groups opposed to our work know this all too well.
                      The animals who share our world deserve our best, our most vigorous defense of them. Americans have shown again and again that they want such a society.
                      In 2009, let us renew our pledge to bring it about.




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                    • Neil
                      Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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                        Set the Table for Change
                        Posted: 29 Dec 2008 12:26 PM CST
                        A few weeks ago, President-elect Barack Obama announced that former Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack would be his selection for Agriculture Secretary, disappointing at least some of the interest groups focused on a food reform agenda for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and continuing his pattern of highly conventional and predictable selections for cabinet posts. We’ve always liked Vilsack, and we endorsed him for the post. The former Iowa governor had a strong record on many animal protection issues that came up in Iowa—everything from cracking down on animal fighting to vetoing legislation that would have classified puppy mill dogs as "farm products" and allowed mourning dove hunting in the state. In his new post, Vilsack will have to confront major food policy issues, and we'll be advocating strongly for a fresh new perspective at the agency.
                        Last week, Kim Severson wrote in The New York Times that there’s another position that’s drawing unprecedented attention: White House chef. That’s because the buzz surrounding America's top chef has become a proxy debate about the future of American food policy. Food reform advocates are pressing hard to persuade President-elect Barack Obama and his wife to choose a White House chef who exemplifies the best progressive thought about organic, sustainable, and ethical eating—and even to have an organic garden on the White House grounds.
                        The man who got the ball rolling was journalist and best-selling author Michael Pollan, whose October “Open Letter to the Future Farmer in Chief” in the New York Times Magazine got the attention of candidate Obama. Obama’s subsequent comments to Time magazine revealed a keen understanding of the crisis in food policy, and, I think, emboldened activist constituents with an interest in broadening the mission of the agency from promoting production agriculture to helping produce and consume healthy food.
                        Pollan spoke for many who would like to substitute a new and dynamic agency built around a national food policy that’s better for people, animals, and the environment. He insists, and he's correct, that we can only address issues of national security, climate change, energy policy, and public health by revamping policies at USDA.
                        Others followed suit. In a letter sent the day after Obama’s election victory, Alice Waters of Chez Panisse put forward the idea of a “kitchen cabinet” to advise the president on food and food policy matters. Days later, some 90 signatories, including Waters, Pollan, writer and professor Marion Nestle, rancher Bill Niman, and journalist and author Eric Schlosser sent Obama a letter urging the appointment of a Secretary of Agriculture knowledgeable and supportive of such concerns as decentralization of food systems and assistance for local farmers’ markets.
                        Like other presidential couples before them, the Obamas have acknowledged their desire to make the White House a model and a symbol of their values, and a place that, as Michelle Obama told 60 Minutes, would “feel open and fun and full of life and energy." The President-elect has expressed his support for family farming and organic agriculture, and Michelle Obama is reportedly a fan of organic food, as is Laura Bush.
                        Just seven people have held the position of White House chef since John F. Kennedy took office in 1961. Before then, presidents and their spouses generally had a family cook to prepare their daily meals while state dinners were catered. Since Kennedy’s time, however, the custom has been for the First Lady to select the chef who creates the meals and menus that will represent the administration’s style and taste to visitors and guests from all over the world. In our day, what is personal is political, and the selection of a progressive chef will speak to all Americans and, to a lesser degree, to the world about the importance of our food choices in making the world more liveable.




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                      • Neil
                        Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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                          2008: A Look Back
                          Posted: 30 Dec 2008 01:29 PM CST
                          I’ve had the privilege of being president of The HSUS for short of five years now. I had hoped, in taking the post, that I could enhance the organization's reputation as a powerful, mainstream force for animal protection—a force that could take on the major forms of institutionalized cruelty and achieve results that made a difference in the lives of animals.


                          Thanks to the support of our members and the work of our talented staff and board, that’s happened, and now the task is not to relent, but instead to continue to strengthen and grow this capability. In looking back at some of my blogs written in 2008, I pulled 10 of the most popular. I think they provide a valuable chronicle of some of the big picture items and controversies over the last year.
                          Here's the list:

                          A Look Ahead: Obama's Ag and Interior Chiefs (Dec. 17): Reaction to President-elect Barack Obama's cabinet selections for Agriculture and Interior Secretary
                          Proposition 2: Views Fit to Print (Oct. 9): The editorial board of The New York Times endorses Proposition 2, the California ballot initiative to ban veal crates, gestation crates, and battery cages
                          Alarm Bells Over Eight Belles (May 5): A discussion of the problems with horse racing, following filly Eight Belles' death at the Kentucky Derby
                          No Downers, No Exceptions (May 20): Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer announces that the USDA will implement a no-downer policy for cattle in the United States
                          Art, Examined (April 25): Controversy surrounds the exhibition of a starving street dog in a Nicaraguan art gallery
                          Uncaging the Truth (Aug. 11): Exposing the opposition to California's Proposition 2
                          Torture on Tape (Jan. 30): The HSUS investigation of Hallmark/Westland Meat Co. breaks, exposing the abuse of downed dairy cows at the Chino, Calif. slaughter plant
                          Safer Fate for Seals (April 15): Rebecca Aldworth, The HSUS's director of Canadian wildlife issues, imagines a future free of Canada's annual slaughter of baby harp seals
                          Puppy Mill Horrors to Hit Millions (April 2): Oprah Winfrey dedicates an entire hour-long program to puppy mills and the related issues of shelter adoptions, spay and neuter, and euthanasia
                          All Paws on Deck (June 4): The generosity and dedication of The HSUS's supporters shines through in response to repeated attacks from the U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance




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                        • Neil
                          Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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                            Talk Back: Senior Pets
                            Posted: 02 Jan 2009 11:24 AM CST
                            A number of you were touched by last week's post on Granny Annie, the 3-legged Boston Terrier whose story a fellow blog reader shared with me. Like Annie's guardian, so many of us have had meaningful experiences with senior and special-needs pets. Here are some of your comments:
                            I would also like to encourage those working with the elderly to help them consider the future of the pet. It is difficult to discuss, but a good caregiver can find a way. —Happy Camper
                            It is the older pets, even the abused ones, who look most for the owner to return. They look through the gate, but just a bit behind you, to see if the error has been corrected and you have brought help. My dream was to have a space in my home for one older dog at a time to retire with grace. Living out the days of their lives with dignity and if not the right owner, at least some one to call their own. Finances have prevented that, but Hope Springs Eternal ! and until such time as I can follow that path, I drive to the pound and love them there. Keep up the good work, and we support and love your efforts. —Ardena Perry
                            There is nothing in this world of animal rescue and well being as honorable as adopting an older 4 legged friend. More than anything, they deserve the best ... —Jonathan Gilbert
                            This is a great reminder to all that there is a loyal dog's heart inside, no matter what the outside looks like. I have adopted older dogs, that for health reasons, only made it a year with us. I hope it was the best year of their lives and I know it was the really important part of their life story, the happy ending they deserved. I volunteer with the Oldies But Goodies Cocker Spaniel Rescue based in VA and MD. It was created for that very reason, for dogs like Granny Annie. I am going to share this with my group and hope it helps others to give an old dog a chance at a warm loving home. Thanks for the wonderful job you do heading up the HSUS. —Lois Davis
                            I love this story!! That's something I've had on my heart for a while. I was browsing through the local shelter's list of adoptable pets, and they had a few special needs ones listed. I'm not able to have pets now, so it was wishful thinking. But whenever I can have pets, I want two cats, regardless of age, but if I ever get a dog, it will be senior or special needs. I'm not a dog person, but they are the ones that have a special place in my heart. —Nione Almie
                            How ironic that I opened up the blog tonight and saw the subject and story on senior dogs. I am about to euthanize my 13.75 yr. old greyhound due to incurable and extensive orthopedic problems and thought today, "I'm never adopting a puppy. I think I'll foster a very old greyhound or a pitbull next." Seniors are the best, and they're great for us who want to give overlooked dogs some good, loving years before they cross the Rainbow Bridge. I also have an 11 yr. old greyhound, and I enjoy every minute of his funny ways. —Deedee D.
                            I'm in tears. Granny Annie has opened my eyes and heart in so many new and beautiful ways. I honestly never thought about the older dogs who only hope to find one special person who will love and care for them. Looks like Granny Annie found her angel. —Pamela Bertsch
                            I want to thank you for writing this piece, it made me and my daughter cry. When we go to shelters to visit the animals, we always spend extra time with the animals that are obviously older and may not get the amount of attention that the younger more attractive animals do. You are so sensitive to note that all animals, no matter what they look like, have shining personalities that far out weigh their outward appearance. We love all animals and it is really heartbreaking to see any animal mistreated in ANY way, ignored or unloved. Thank you for writing this wonderful piece. —Erlyn, Mark and Kaitlyn Garrison
                            What a beautiful, wonderful touching story! It definitely brought tears to my eyes. Our cat, Summer, was rescued from two young boys that were putting her in a pillow case. So my daughter's boyfriend at that time, rescued her and now she has a wonderful safe home with us! She is deeply loved and I only hope that all animals will be that loved some day. May God Bless all of you who rescue animals and take care of them. All of you should be proud of yourselves! May, thank you for taking in this BEAUTIFUL dog!! —Karen E Wagner
                            What a beautiful and selfless thing to do. I think people forget that animals just like people are special and loving on the inside. However, animals show their love and appreciation everyday where as humans get caught up in their everyday lives and forget the simple things in life. —Lesley
                            Your story on the 3-legged Boston bull terrier tugged at my heart. Until I read that you kept her, I knew we would take her. We have a house full of previously unwanted and somewhat physically damaged pets. There could have been room for one more.They are perfect on the inside and return overwhelming amounts of affection for the little material sustainence we give them. Learning of the good people like you that exist gives me hope that we can offset those many that are not.You all have my best wishes this holiday season. —Arnie Fiergang










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                          • Neil
                            Forwarding the message. Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation wrote: Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation h1 a:hover
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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                              On the Ropes
                              Posted: 05 Jan 2009 01:16 PM CST
                              Two weeks ago, meat industry groups announced they’d filed a legal challenge to portions of the upgraded Downed Animal Protection Act in California, passed last year by the state legislature in the wake of our investigation into a southern California slaughter plant formerly called Hallmark/Westland. And also last week, the Montana Supreme Court rejected a legal maneuver by game farms to secure remuneration for any loss in business attributed to a 2000 statewide ballot initiative that stopped them from allowing trophy hunters to shoot captive animals on their properties. I asked Jonathan Lovvorn, our vice president and chief counsel for Animal Protection Litigation and Research, to offer his observations about these important legal cases—the meat industry case just launched, and the canned hunting case now decided.
                              Along the pathway to any social reform, there are leaders—like the groups and individuals who pushed for passage of Proposition 2 in California. And there are laggards.
                              But every once and again you find players who are stuck in the mud, knee-deep.
                              A good case in point is the recent surprise decision by the National Meat Association (NMA) and the American Meat Institute (AMI)—two trade groups representing major packing and slaughterhouse companies—to file suit seeking to overturn key provisions of California’s newly upgraded law banning the use of sick and disabled animals in the food supply.
                              These groups are taking dead aim at the law enacted in response to an HSUS investigation that exposed torment of downer cows at a southern California slaughter plant. The Hallmark/Westland plant, based in Chino, was the nation’s number two supplier of ground beef to the National School Lunch Program.

                              © The HSUS
                              A downed cow is shoved with a forklift at Hallmark/Westland.
                              The resulting scandal over the abuse of dairy cattle at Hallmark exposed major gaps in food safety and humane handling, and probably cost the meat industry and the federal government more than $1 billion when all costs were tallied.
                              According to the groups’ papers, they think California lacks the authority to protect school children from mad cow and other foodborne illness, or to prevent wanton cruelty to farm animals. They also claim that the law is “unnecessary” because many downed animals are simply tired, and “could recover with rest time.”
                              Did these groups already forget the shocking images of workers using forklifts, electric prods, and high pressure water hoses to force disabled animals into the slaughter plant? Did any of these animals look like they were just a little tuckered out and needed a rest?
                              Even one of the livestock industry’s own commentators decried the move, wisely noting that “victory in court will prove much more costly than the loss of an extremely small number of non-ambulatory animals... Watching two of the most influential meat industry trade associations fight and win a court battle on a legal technicality will do nothing to help restore [public] confidence.”
                              And if NMA and AMI are expecting the courts to declare the California law invalid, they are likely to be disappointed.
                              Two federal appeals courts have already ruled that states have the authority to ban the slaughter of certain animals (in those cases, horses rather than disabled animals) where the slaughter and sale of such animals is contrary to the state’s interest in preserving public morals and protecting public health. The U.S. Supreme Court has twice rejected requests to reconsider those rulings.
                              But these animal-use groups are often slow to pick up on changing currents in the law.

                              © iStockphoto

                              Take the example of the Montana Supreme Court’s decision last Wednesday rejecting a legal challenge to the state’s canned hunting ban—which was enacted by voters through a ballot initiative in 2000. Canned hunt operators—people who make their living collecting fees from unethical trophy hunters who want to shoot elk and other tame animals behind a fence—challenged the law years ago. They argued the state somehow owed them financial compensation for the loss of their “right” to operate canned hunting facilities, a theory the Montana supreme court categorically rejected.
                              It’s a claim we hear a lot—whether it’s the “right” to cram factory farm animals into tiny wire cages, the “right” to fight animals for gambling, or the “right” to slaughter American horses for foreign diners. Time and again, these arguments are summarily rejected by the courts.
                              Indeed, every single legal challenge to an HSUS-backed animal law that has been brought in the last five years has failed.
                              These animal-use groups march into the courts because they have already lost in the court of public opinion and in the nation’s legislatures, and the courts represent one last Hail Mary maneuver on their part.
                              Ironically, this was traditionally the recourse of the animal protection community—shut out of the legislative and political process, and focused primarily on difficult and sometimes hopeless one-at-a-time legal challenges to laws and policies that had already been decided against our interests.
                              The humane movement has proved more adept in recent years, and taken the lead in enacting humane laws, changing public opinion, and using litigation as a tool for advancing the larger social agenda.
                              This noticeable inversion in position—wherein those who profit from animal cruelty and abuse are now the ones stuck filing the last-gasp legal challenges—means a lot of things for the animals and our movement. But more than anything, it’s an unmistakable sign that we are winning.



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                            • rojony57
                              It has come to my attention that it looks like I have sent Wayne s great messages more than once. Wayne Pacelle of The Humane Society of the United States
                              Message 14 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
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                                It has come to my attention that it looks like I have sent Wayne's
                                great messages more than once. Wayne Pacelle of The Humane Society of
                                the United States titles all of his messages the same, so the content
                                is different in each message. I could send the same message more than
                                once, but not this time around.

                                --- In SFVeg@yahoogroups.com, Neil <rojony57@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Forwarding the message.
                                >
                                > "Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation" <blog@...> wrote: Wayne Pacelle:
                                A Humane Nation h1 a:hover {background-color:#888;color:#fff !
                                important;} div#emailbody table#itemcontentlist tr td div ul {
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                                {border:none;} Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation | The Humane
                                Society of the United States
                                > 2008: A Look Back
                                > Posted: 30 Dec 2008 01:29 PM CST
                                > I’ve had the privilege of being president of The HSUS for short
                                of five years now. I had hoped, in taking the post, that I could
                                enhance the organization's reputation as a powerful, mainstream force
                                for animal protectionâ€"a force that could take on the major forms of
                                institutionalized cruelty and achieve results that made a difference
                                in the lives of animals.
                                >
                                >
                                > Thanks to the support of our members and the work of our talented
                                staff and board, that’s happened, and now the task is not to relent,
                                but instead to continue to strengthen and grow this capability. In
                                looking back at some of my blogs written in 2008, I pulled 10 of the
                                most popular. I think they provide a valuable chronicle of some of the
                                big picture items and controversies over the last year.
                                > Here's the list:
                                >
                                > A Look Ahead: Obama's Ag and Interior Chiefs (Dec. 17): Reaction
                                to President-elect Barack Obama's cabinet selections for Agriculture
                                and Interior Secretary
                                > Proposition 2: Views Fit to Print (Oct. 9): The editorial board
                                of The New York Times endorses Proposition 2, the California ballot
                                initiative to ban veal crates, gestation crates, and battery cages
                                > Alarm Bells Over Eight Belles (May 5): A discussion of the
                                problems with horse racing, following filly Eight Belles' death at the
                                Kentucky Derby
                                > No Downers, No Exceptions (May 20): Agriculture Secretary Ed
                                Schafer announces that the USDA will implement a no-downer policy for
                                cattle in the United States
                                > Art, Examined (April 25): Controversy surrounds the exhibition of
                                a starving street dog in a Nicaraguan art gallery
                                > Uncaging the Truth (Aug. 11): Exposing the opposition to
                                California's Proposition 2
                                > Torture on Tape (Jan. 30): The HSUS investigation of
                                Hallmark/Westland Meat Co. breaks, exposing the abuse of downed dairy
                                cows at the Chino, Calif. slaughter plant
                                > Safer Fate for Seals (April 15): Rebecca Aldworth, The HSUS's
                                director of Canadian wildlife issues, imagines a future free of
                                Canada's annual slaughter of baby harp seals
                                > Puppy Mill Horrors to Hit Millions (April 2): Oprah Winfrey
                                dedicates an entire hour-long program to puppy mills and the related
                                issues of shelter adoptions, spay and neuter, and euthanasia
                                > All Paws on Deck (June 4): The generosity and dedication of The
                                HSUS's supporters shines through in response to repeated attacks from
                                the U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Email Delivery powered by FeedBurner
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Enjoy life and smile.
                                >
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                              • Mitch Cohen
                                Interesting... HSUS considers Vilsack one of its top choices: hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2008/12/obama-cabinet.html Organic Consumers Assoc (OCA) thinks he d be
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jan 7, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Interesting... HSUS considers Vilsack one of its top choices:
                                  hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2008/12/obama-cabinet.html

                                  Organic Consumers Assoc (OCA) thinks he'd be terrible for Ag Secy, and has a campaign to stop his apptmt:
                                  www.organicconsumers.org/bytes/ob157.htm Food First concurs with OCA.

                                  To: sfveg@yahoogroups.com
                                  From: rojony57@...
                                  Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 00:32:04 -0800
                                  Subject: [SFVeg] Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation | The Humane Society of the United States




















                                  "Wayne Pacelle: A Humane Nation" wrote: ....2008: A Look Back

                                  Posted: 30 Dec 2008 01:29 PM CST



                                  ...A Look Ahead: Obama's Ag and Interior Chiefs (Dec. 17): Reaction to President-elect Barack Obama's cabinet selections for Agriculture and Interior Secretary








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