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murder by numbers

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  • vasumurti@netscape.net
    Hi all, There was a rumor floating around that Tipper Gore had become a vegetarian. I don t think there s any truth to it. Back in the 90s, there was a rumor
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 16, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all,

      There was a rumor floating around that Tipper Gore had become a
      vegetarian. I don't think there's any truth to it. Back in the '90s,
      there was a rumor briefly floating around that Hilary Clinton had
      become a vegetarian.

      Dennis Kucinich's veganism got attention in the veg*n press (e.g.,
      Veg-News), but was not discussed at all by the mainstream media, except
      to mention that he wouldn't try to impose his morality upon everyone
      else. I have a problem with this mentality, which even animal activists
      fall prey to, from time to time. In the Animals' Agenda, several years
      ago, for example, columnist Lawrence Carter-Long wrote a column asking
      "Should the Vegetarian Proselytize?" To me, the answer is obvious!

      Why doesn't the media mention the vegetarianism of any celebrity?
      Possibly because people become vegetarian for any number of reasons.
      Back in 1982-83, when Sir Richard Attenborough's biographical film
      "Gandhi" was released, someone wrote in to the Los Angeles Times and
      pointed out that while it was a good movie, Attenborough failed to
      mention that Gandhi was a vegetarian. The letter writer said this would
      be like making a movie on the Pope and forgetting to mention that he's
      Catholic!

      Another letter writer wrote in, responding to this first letter, and
      tried to dismiss Gandhi's vegetarianism by repeating the old myth that
      Hitler was a vegetarian, too. Vegetarian historian Rynn Berry of the
      North American Vegetarian Society (NAVS) debunks this myth in his 2004
      book, Hitler: Neither Vegetarian Nor Animal Lover. I gave a copy of
      Rynn Berry's book to Dixie Mahy a couple of years ago, and she gave it
      a favorable review in the SFVS newsletter. Roberta Kalechofsky of Jews
      for Animal Rights wrote an article entitled "Nazis and Animals:
      Debunking the Myths", which appeared in a 1996 issue of the Animals'
      Agenda.

      I agree with Rynn Berry's assertion that the evidence (Scriptural,
      theological, historical, etc.) that Jesus was a vegetarian is
      circumstancial at best, but nonetheless compelling. I discussed this
      point with Dixie some time ago. If Jesus really was a vegetarian, the
      ancient world would have taken notice: just like they did with
      Pythagoras. (The chapter on Pythagorean vegetarianism, from my book
      They Shall Not Hurt or Destroy is attached as a Word document.)

      Jesus was a rabbi in the Jewish tradition, which upholds vegetarianism
      as a moral ideal. (The chapter on Jewish vegetarianism, from my book
      They Shall Not Hurt or Destroy is also attached as a Word document.)
      There is nothing in the synoptic gospels of Jesus to suggest a
      fundamental break with Judaism. Jesus was called Rabbi, meaning Master
      or Teacher, 42 times in the gospels. The ministry of Jesus was a
      rabbinic one. Jesus related Scripture and God's laws to everyday life,
      teaching by personal example. He engaged in healing and acts of mercy.
      He told stories or parables--a rabbinic method of teaching. He went to
      the synagogue (Matthew 12:9), taught in the synagogues (Matthew 4:23,
      13:54; Mark 1:39), expressed concern for Jairus, "one of the rulers of
      the synagogue" (Mark 5:36), and it "was his custom" to go to the
      synagogue on the Sabbath (Luke 4:16).

      Jesus blessed the meek, repeating Psalm 37:11, saying they would
      inherit the earth. Here, Jesus refers to Isaiah's vision (11:6-9) of
      the future Kingdom of Peace, where the earth is restored to a
      vegetarian paradise (Genesis 1:29-31). Jesus taught his followers to
      pray for the coming of this Kingdom, in what is now known as "the
      Lord's Prayer". Jesus said he did not come to abolish the Law and the
      prophets, instead he insisted upon the moral standards given by God at
      the beginning (Matthew 19:1-12; Mark 10:2-12; Luke 12:24-28)

      Jesus repeatedly upheld Mosaic Law: Matthew 5:17-19; Mark 10:17-22;
      Luke 16:17. He justified his healing on the Sabbath by referring to
      commandments calling for the humane treatment of animals as well as
      their rest on the Sabbath (Luke 13:10-16, 14:1-5). He recalled a Jewish
      legend about Moses' compassion as a shepherd for his flock (Matthew
      18:11-13; Luke 15:3-7,10) Jesus taught that God desires mercy and not
      sacrifice (Matthew 9:10-13, 12:6-7; Mark 2:15-17; Luke 5:29-32), and he
      opposed the buying and selling of animals for sacrifice (Matthew
      21:12-14; Mark 11:15; John 2:14-15). I agree with secular scholar Keith
      Akers (author, The Lost Religion of Jesus) that Jesus did not come to
      abolish the Law and the prophets (Matthew 5:17-19; Mark 10:17-22; Luke
      16:17), but only the institution of animal sacrifice, and that the
      gentile world (beginning with the apostle Paul) mistook this for a
      rejection of the entire Mosaic framework.

      It was Paul, then, and not Jesus, who broke from Judaism, and created
      a separate religion. Bertrand Russell refers to Paul as the "inventor
      of Christianity." Again, I agree with vegetarian historian Rynn Berry
      of the North American Vegetarian Society (NAVS) that the evidence
      (Scriptural, theological, historical, etc.) that Jesus was a vegetarian
      is circumstancial at best, but nonetheless compelling.

      Enjoy reading the attachments!

      Best wishes!

      ---Vasu

      vasumurti@...


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • vasumurti@netscape.net
      (I m re-sending this posting, along with the two attachments which were lost the last time around.) Hi all, There was a rumor floating around that Tipper Gore
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 16, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        (I'm re-sending this posting, along with the two attachments
        which were lost the last time around.)

        Hi all,

        There was a rumor floating around that Tipper Gore had become a
        vegetarian. I don't think there's any truth to it. Back in the '90s,
        there was a rumor briefly floating around that Hilary Clinton had
        become a vegetarian.

        Dennis Kucinich's veganism got attention in the veg*n press (e.g.,
        Veg-News), but was not discussed at all by the mainstream media,
        except
        to mention that he wouldn't try to impose his morality upon everyone
        else. I have a problem with this mentality, which even animal
        activists
        fall prey to, from time to time. In the Animals' Agenda, several years
        ago, for example, columnist Lawrence Carter-Long wrote a column asking
        "Should the Vegetarian Proselytize?" To me, the answer is obvious!

        Why doesn't the media mention the vegetarianism of any celebrity?
        Possibly because people become vegetarian for any number of reasons.
        Back in 1982-83, when Sir Richard Attenborough's biographical film
        "Gandhi" was released, someone wrote in to the Los Angeles Times and
        pointed out that while it was a good movie, Attenborough failed to
        mention that Gandhi was a vegetarian. The letter writer said this
        would
        be like making a movie on the Pope and forgetting to mention that he's
        Catholic!

        Another letter writer wrote in, responding to this first letter, and
        tried to dismiss Gandhi's vegetarianism by repeating the old myth that
        Hitler was a vegetarian, too. Vegetarian historian Rynn Berry of the
        North American Vegetarian Society (NAVS) debunks this myth in his 2004
        book, Hitler: Neither Vegetarian Nor Animal Lover. I gave a copy of
        Rynn Berry's book to Dixie Mahy a couple of years ago, and she gave it
        a favorable review in the SFVS newsletter. Roberta Kalechofsky of Jews
        for Animal Rights wrote an article entitled "Nazis and Animals:
        Debunking the Myths", which appeared in a 1996 issue of the Animals'
        Agenda.

        I agree with Rynn Berry's assertion that the evidence (Scriptural,
        theological, historical, etc.) that Jesus was a vegetarian is
        circumstancial at best, but nonetheless compelling. I discussed this
        point with Dixie some time ago. If Jesus really was a vegetarian, the
        ancient world would have taken notice: just like they did with
        Pythagoras. (The chapter on Pythagorean vegetarianism, from my book
        They Shall Not Hurt or Destroy is attached as a Word document.)

        Jesus was a rabbi in the Jewish tradition, which upholds vegetarianism
        as a moral ideal. (The chapter on Jewish vegetarianism, from my book
        They Shall Not Hurt or Destroy is also attached as a Word document.)
        There is nothing in the synoptic gospels of Jesus to suggest a
        fundamental break with Judaism. Jesus was called Rabbi, meaning Master
        or Teacher, 42 times in the gospels. The ministry of Jesus was a
        rabbinic one. Jesus related Scripture and God's laws to everyday life,
        teaching by personal example. He engaged in healing and acts of mercy.
        He told stories or parables--a rabbinic method of teaching. He went to
        the synagogue (Matthew 12:9), taught in the synagogues (Matthew 4:23,
        13:54; Mark 1:39), expressed concern for Jairus, "one of the rulers of
        the synagogue" (Mark 5:36), and it "was his custom" to go to the
        synagogue on the Sabbath (Luke 4:16).

        Jesus blessed the meek, repeating Psalm 37:11, saying they would
        inherit the earth. Here, Jesus refers to Isaiah's vision (11:6-9) of
        the future Kingdom of Peace, where the earth is restored to a
        vegetarian paradise (Genesis 1:29-31). Jesus taught his followers to
        pray for the coming of this Kingdom, in what is now known as "the
        Lord's Prayer". Jesus said he did not come to abolish the Law and the
        prophets, instead he insisted upon the moral standards given by God at
        the beginning (Matthew 19:1-12; Mark 10:2-12; Luke 12:24-28)

        Jesus repeatedly upheld Mosaic Law: Matthew 5:17-19; Mark 10:17-22;
        Luke 16:17. He justified his healing on the Sabbath by referring to
        commandments calling for the humane treatment of animals as well as
        their rest on the Sabbath (Luke 13:10-16, 14:1-5). He recalled a
        Jewish
        legend about Moses' compassion as a shepherd for his flock (Matthew
        18:11-13; Luke 15:3-7,10) Jesus taught that God desires mercy and not
        sacrifice (Matthew 9:10-13, 12:6-7; Mark 2:15-17; Luke 5:29-32), and
        he
        opposed the buying and selling of animals for sacrifice (Matthew
        21:12-14; Mark 11:15; John 2:14-15). I agree with secular scholar
        Keith
        Akers (author, The Lost Religion of Jesus) that Jesus did not come to
        abolish the Law and the prophets (Matthew 5:17-19; Mark 10:17-22; Luke
        16:17), but only the institution of animal sacrifice, and that the
        gentile world (beginning with the apostle Paul) mistook this for a
        rejection of the entire Mosaic framework.

        It was Paul, then, and not Jesus, who broke from Judaism, and created
        a separate religion. Bertrand Russell refers to Paul as the "inventor
        of Christianity." Again, I agree with vegetarian historian Rynn Berry
        of the North American Vegetarian Society (NAVS) that the evidence
        (Scriptural, theological, historical, etc.) that Jesus was a
        vegetarian
        is circumstancial at best, but nonetheless compelling.

        Enjoy reading the attachments!

        Best wishes!

        ---Vasu

        vasumurti@...




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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