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OT: Fwd: [slowcooker] Indian Dals Times Two (lentil-based/vegetarian)

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  • Audrey White
    Namaste all, This came from the slowcooker list I m on. I m no cook but it looks intersting to try. I have no idea if this is even a remotely period food.
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1, 2005
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      Namaste all,

      This came from the slowcooker list I'm on. I'm no
      cook but it looks intersting to try. I have no idea
      if this is even a remotely period food.

      -Suavarrana

      --- Liz Canham <liz_canham@...> wrote:

      Hi

      In answer to the search for vegetarian curry, the two
      dal recipes on
      this page
      http://www.lizebiz.com/asian-food/articles/Indian-dals.html
      (posted below) can be cooked in a slow cooker up to
      the time of adding the
      flavourings. It will take 4 - 6 hours to cook the
      lentils through but
      they can't realy be over-cooked in the context of this
      recipe. Just
      make sure that there is sufficient water.

      Liz


      Indian Dal Times Two
      by Liz Canham

      Pulses are something of a staple in India, having a
      high vegetarian population. Alone, however, they are
      somewhat tasteless and indigestible but with spices
      added and served with any of rice, bread, yoghurt and
      for non-vegetarians a Tandoori or curried meat or
      poultry dish, they become a feast.

      Either of the following work well with these recipes
      which serve 4-6 people:

      Masoor dal - red split lentils which turn pale yellow
      when cooked
      Chana dal - similar to yellow split peas (which can be
      substituted)
      Basic Ingredients
      8oz (225g) chana dal or yellow split peas or red
      lentils
      2pints (1.15 litres) water
      1/2 tsp ground turmeric
      2 slices unpeeled root ginger
      Salt


      Wash the dal and pick out any discoloured pieces.
      Leave to soak for 2 hours. Rinse again thoroughly and
      put in a large saucepan with about two-thirds of the
      water. DO NOT ADD SALT AT THIS STAGE - salt dried out
      pulses on any kind and can prevent them becoming soft.
      Bring to the boil, skim any scum from the surface with
      a slotted spoon and add the two slices of ginger and
      the ground turmeric. Let the dal simmer until cooked
      (30 minutes to 1 hour) but if it becomes dry before
      being cooked add some more of the water and stir.

      When the dal is cooked, add salt to taste and either
      of the following sets of flavourings:

      Flavouring Set 1
      3 tbsp oil or ghee for frying
      1 tbsp whole cumin seeds
      1 medium onion, finely chopped
      2 tbsp finely chopped garlic
      1 tbsp finely chopped fresh root ginger (or minced
      ginger from a jar, if you prefer)
      4 hot fresh green or red chillies, seeded and finely
      chopped (or to taste)
      2 medium tomatoes, seeded and finely chopped
      1 tbsp garam masala
      Chopped mint or fresh coriander (optional)

      While the dal is cooking, heat the oil in a
      medium-sized frying pan and when quite hot, add the
      whole cumin seeds. Use a lid or splatter-guard if you
      have one because they will begin to pop and may spit.
      Add the onion and fry until golden brown, then add the
      garlic and ginger and continue to fry, stirring
      continuously for a further 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes
      and chillies and fry until the tomatoes are soft.

      When the dal is cooked, stir in the spice/vegetable
      mixture and make sure it is warmed through. Add the
      garam masala and stir through then garnish with a
      handful of mint or coriander, if wanted.

      Flavouring set 2
      3 tbsp oil or ghee for frying
      2 large cloves garlic, finely sliced
      1 tbsp whole cumin seeds
      1 tbsp ground coriander
      1/2 tsp cayenne pepper or chilli powder (or to taste)

      Wait until the dal is cooked and you are ready to
      serve before continuing with this recipe.

      Heat the oil in a small saucepan until a cumin seed
      sizzles when dropped in. Sizzle all the cumin seeds
      and the sliced garlic until brown. Add the coriander
      and cayenne or chilli powder, swirl round quickly in
      the hot oil and pour the whole lot into the dal. You
      can stir it in or leave it on the top if you wish.

      About the Author

      Copyright Liz Canham 2005
    • unclrashid
      Probably not very period, since they use chiles and tomatoes, both from the New World. But I don t know for sure when they would have gotten to India (via the
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 1, 2005
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        Probably not very period, since they use chiles and tomatoes, both from
        the New World.

        But I don't know for sure when they would have gotten to India (via the
        Portugese, probably). I suppose it is remotely possible that they
        could have been available to Indian cooks by some time in the 16th
        century. anybody know for sure?

        Rashid




        --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Audrey White <rosadioro@y...> wrote:
        > Namaste all,
        >
        > This came from the slowcooker list I'm on. I'm no
        > cook but it looks intersting to try. I have no idea
        > if this is even a remotely period food.
        >
        >
      • Margaret Polson
        ... Peppers yes, at least around Goa. Meenakshi ____________________________________________________ Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 1, 2005
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          >
          > But I don't know for sure when they would have
          > gotten to India (via the
          > Portugese, probably). I suppose it is remotely
          > possible that they
          > could have been available to Indian cooks by some
          > time in the 16th
          > century. anybody know for sure?
          >

          Peppers yes, at least around Goa.

          Meenakshi



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        • Jim and Andi
          Hey Meenakshi! If anyone can find it, it s you. Will you post the reference for that? I would *love* to see final, incontrovertable proof one way or the other.
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 6, 2005
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            Hey Meenakshi! If anyone can find it, it's you. Will you post the
            reference for that? I would *love* to see final, incontrovertable
            proof one way or the other. It would make several cooking research
            people very happy.

            If anyone is looking for pre-16th century vegetarian dishes, the best
            place to look is Indian Food: A Historical Companion by KT Achaya. It
            has descriptions of entire vegetarian feasts from different kingdoms.

            Madhavi

            --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Margaret Polson <mlpolson@y...>
            wrote:
            > >
            > > But I don't know for sure when they would have
            > > gotten to India (via the
            > > Portugese, probably). I suppose it is remotely
            > > possible that they
            > > could have been available to Indian cooks by some
            > > time in the 16th
            > > century. anybody know for sure?
            > >
            >
            > Peppers yes, at least around Goa.
            >
            > Meenakshi
          • Margaret Polson
            The Portuguese in India (The New Cambridge History of India) Cambridge University Press (March 31, 1988) ISBN: 0521257131 by M. N. Pearson, Gordon Johnson
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 6, 2005
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              The Portuguese in India (The New Cambridge History of
              India) Cambridge University Press (March 31, 1988)
              ISBN: 0521257131 by M. N. Pearson, Gordon Johnson

              Mentions the Portuguese importing peppers to India.

              It also has all sorts of cool stuff about how the
              Portuguese lived in India. Evidentily they did "go
              native" with a fair regularity (a group of them fought
              with the Sultan of Biajapur against the Portuguese
              army among other things)

              Still reading it, more later

              Meenakshi

              PS for your cool extra fact, when da Gama got to India
              one of the people who acted as a translator for him
              was a Polish Jew living in India

              --- Jim and Andi <icbhod@...> wrote:

              > Hey Meenakshi! If anyone can find it, it's you. Will
              > you post the
              > reference for that? I would *love* to see final,
              > incontrovertable
              > proof one way or the other. It would make several
              > cooking research
              > people very happy.
              >
              > If anyone is looking for pre-16th century vegetarian
              > dishes, the best
              > place to look is Indian Food: A Historical Companion
              > by KT Achaya. It
              > has descriptions of entire vegetarian feasts from
              > different kingdoms.
              >
              > Madhavi
              >
              > --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Margaret Polson
              > <mlpolson@y...>
              > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > But I don't know for sure when they would have
              > > > gotten to India (via the
              > > > Portugese, probably). I suppose it is remotely
              > > > possible that they
              > > > could have been available to Indian cooks by
              > some
              > > > time in the 16th
              > > > century. anybody know for sure?
              > > >
              > >
              > > Peppers yes, at least around Goa.
              > >
              > > Meenakshi
              >
              >
              >





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            • Jim and Andi
              If that s the only one, then we re still SOL. It proves that chilis were *there*, but not that the native populations used them in their cooking. Take New
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 7, 2005
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                If that's the only one, then we're still SOL. It proves that chilis
                were *there*, but not that the native populations used them in their
                cooking. Take New World potatoes as an example- they *grew* potatoes
                in England (?) but they didn't eat them- they thought the potato
                plants had pretty foliage. The Portuguese may have been eating them
                by then, or they may have been snorting them as medicine. (ouch) If
                someone found chilis in a list of ingredients someone purchased for
                a feast, that would be good proof.

                Madhavi


                --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Margaret Polson <mlpolson@y...>
                wrote:
                > The Portuguese in India (The New Cambridge History of
                > India) Cambridge University Press (March 31, 1988)
                > ISBN: 0521257131 by M. N. Pearson, Gordon Johnson
                >
                > Mentions the Portuguese importing peppers to India.
                >
                > It also has all sorts of cool stuff about how the
                > Portuguese lived in India. Evidentily they did "go
                > native" with a fair regularity (a group of them fought
                > with the Sultan of Biajapur against the Portuguese
                > army among other things)
                >
                > Still reading it, more later
                >
                > Meenakshi
              • Margaret Polson
                I ll check what the reference says. I think it may reference cooking, but that may have just been what the Portuguese were cooking. That still does not get
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 7, 2005
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                  I'll check what the reference says. I think it may
                  reference cooking, but that may have just been what
                  the Portuguese were cooking. That still does not get
                  us when the Indian started cooking with them.

                  --- Jim and Andi <icbhod@...> wrote:

                  > If that's the only one, then we're still SOL. It
                  > proves that chilis
                  > were *there*, but not that the native populations
                  > used them in their
                  > cooking. Take New World potatoes as an example- they
                  > *grew* potatoes
                  > in England (?) but they didn't eat them- they
                  > thought the potato
                  > plants had pretty foliage. The Portuguese may have
                  > been eating them
                  > by then, or they may have been snorting them as
                  > medicine. (ouch) If
                  > someone found chilis in a list of ingredients
                  > someone purchased for
                  > a feast, that would be good proof.
                  >
                  > Madhavi
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Margaret Polson
                  > <mlpolson@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > The Portuguese in India (The New Cambridge History
                  > of
                  > > India) Cambridge University Press (March 31, 1988)
                  >
                  > > ISBN: 0521257131 by M. N. Pearson, Gordon Johnson
                  > >
                  > > Mentions the Portuguese importing peppers to
                  > India.
                  > >
                  > > It also has all sorts of cool stuff about how the
                  > > Portuguese lived in India. Evidentily they did
                  > "go
                  > > native" with a fair regularity (a group of them
                  > fought
                  > > with the Sultan of Biajapur against the Portuguese
                  > > army among other things)
                  > >
                  > > Still reading it, more later
                  > >
                  > > Meenakshi
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >


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                • marcus findlay-arthur
                  Any luck with looking at Vedic diet restrictions? Example: Eggs aren t too popular in some areas or sects since they inflame the libedo, onions & garlic are
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 15, 2005
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                    Any luck with looking at Vedic diet restrictions? Example: Eggs aren't too popular in some areas or sects since they "inflame" the libedo, onions & garlic are also considered non-satvic (I think thats the term.) If you can track down something like that about the taboos maybe you can get a lead?
                    Mangal.

                    Margaret Polson <mlpolson@...> wrote:
                    I'll check what the reference says.  I think it may
                    reference cooking, but that may have just been what
                    the Portuguese were cooking.  That still does not get
                    us when the Indian started cooking with them.

                    --- Jim and Andi <icbhod@...> wrote:

                    > If that's the only one, then we're still SOL. It
                    > proves that chilis
                    > were *there*, but not that the native populations
                    > used them in their
                    > cooking. Take New World potatoes as an example- they
                    > *grew* potatoes
                    > in England (?) but they didn't eat them- they
                    > thought the potato
                    > plants had pretty foliage. The Portuguese may have
                    > been eating them
                    > by then, or they may have been snorting them as
                    > medicine. (ouch) If
                    > someone found chilis in a list of ingredients
                    > someone purchased for
                    > a feast, that would be good proof.
                    >
                    > Madhavi
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Margaret Polson
                    > <mlpolson@y...>
                    > wrote:
                    > > The Portuguese in India (The New Cambridge History
                    > of
                    > > India) Cambridge University Press (March 31, 1988)
                    >
                    > > ISBN: 0521257131 by M. N. Pearson, Gordon Johnson
                    > >
                    > > Mentions the Portuguese importing peppers to
                    > India. 
                    > >
                    > > It also has all sorts of cool stuff about how the
                    > > Portuguese lived in India.  Evidentily they did
                    > "go
                    > > native" with a fair regularity (a group of them
                    > fought
                    > > with the Sultan of Biajapur against the Portuguese
                    > > army among other things)
                    > >
                    > > Still reading it, more later
                    > >
                    > > Meenakshi
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >


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                  • Anuja Simpson
                    Speaking of... There s a joking insult that is used at least since my momma was growing up. Goes like this: Taru Sasu Kanda Kai. Translation- Your Mother Eats
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 15, 2005
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                      Speaking of...
                      There's a joking insult that is used at least since my momma was growing up.
                      Goes like this: Taru Sasu Kanda Kai.
                      Translation- Your Mother Eats Onions.

                      haha
                      Anuja


                      On 9/15/05, marcus findlay-arthur <mangal_sews@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Any luck with looking at Vedic diet restrictions? Example: Eggs aren't too
                      > popular in some areas or sects since they "inflame" the libedo, onions &
                      > garlic are also considered non-satvic (I think thats the term.) If you can
                      > track down something like that about the taboos maybe you can get a lead?
                      > Mangal.

                      --
                      Anuja Simpson
                      C (530)848-8509
                      anuja.simpson@...
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