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Bread?

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  • bethlakshmi <beth@pir.net>
    Hi everyone... So, I m doing an Indian Embassy for an event in my Barony in March, and the chefs (not me!) have started in on a menu that encompasses a serving
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 3, 2003
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      Hi everyone...

      So, I'm doing an Indian Embassy for an event in my Barony in March,
      and the chefs (not me!) have started in on a menu that encompasses a
      serving of Indian food. The self-titled "Bread Lady" has contacted
      me asking for information on Indian breads and I'm at a loss, since
      food isn't something I've researched. I've sent her toward
      Cariadoc's Miscellany, which has two Indian bread recipes, but I also
      wanted to get info from you guys.

      They're not being real particular on where/when they are aiming for,
      but I expect the menu is fairly Northern biased. The original
      thought was garlic naan, but the Bread Lady tells me her preference
      is for documentable above all things (yay!). They'll be serving some
      soupy stuff, so bread that can be used for scooping (like naan) would
      be good. And the bread will be made the day before, so something
      that keep well for 24 hours and doesn't have to be hot or can be
      heated would be a win.

      Anyone out there with documentation and recipes, etc, for historic
      Indian breads - please send me what you've got! I know there's a lot
      of recipes I can suck off the Internet for "traditional" Indian food,
      but the catch is that I'm really looking for historic references, so
      I'm hestitant to use modern recipes until I know about the past.

      Thanks!

      -Lakshmi
    • Jim and Andi
      You can use any recipe for chapati, puri, or naan that doesn t use obviously modern ingredients. The ingredients are so simple (flour, water and ghee for
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 3, 2003
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        You can use any recipe for chapati, puri, or naan that doesn't use obviously
        modern ingredients. The ingredients are so simple (flour, water and ghee for
        chapati and puri, and flour, water, yogurt, ghee and yeast for naan) that I
        doubt they've changed at all. I'm sure your bread lady can relate to the
        fact that no one wrote down recipes for any of these, they were too common!
        At least I've never seen one. Chapati can be rewarmed over a tawa with
        success if you make them with a little extra ghee, and naan keep well if you
        put them in a brown paper bag straight out of the oven so they stay soft.
        They did make filled chapati in period, and I have a modern recipe from a
        period reference to naan covered in onions and cumin and baked, but it's
        Persian.

        Hope that helps,
        Madhavi

        -----Original Message-----
        From: bethlakshmi <beth@...> [mailto:beth@...]
        Sent: Monday, February 03, 2003 10:06 AM
        To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA_India] Bread?


        Hi everyone...

        So, I'm doing an Indian Embassy for an event in my Barony in March,
        and the chefs (not me!) have started in on a menu that encompasses a
        serving of Indian food. The self-titled "Bread Lady" has contacted
        me asking for information on Indian breads and I'm at a loss, since
        food isn't something I've researched. I've sent her toward
        Cariadoc's Miscellany, which has two Indian bread recipes, but I also
        wanted to get info from you guys.

        They're not being real particular on where/when they are aiming for,
        but I expect the menu is fairly Northern biased. The original
        thought was garlic naan, but the Bread Lady tells me her preference
        is for documentable above all things (yay!). They'll be serving some
        soupy stuff, so bread that can be used for scooping (like naan) would
        be good. And the bread will be made the day before, so something
        that keep well for 24 hours and doesn't have to be hot or can be
        heated would be a win.

        Anyone out there with documentation and recipes, etc, for historic
        Indian breads - please send me what you've got! I know there's a lot
        of recipes I can suck off the Internet for "traditional" Indian food,
        but the catch is that I'm really looking for historic references, so
        I'm hestitant to use modern recipes until I know about the past.

        Thanks!

        -Lakshmi


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