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Male Chola Name Advice

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  • Julian O Neill
    Namaste. I am back with yet another naming inquiry. I am attempting to create a male Chola (Tamil) style name. Documentation is a bit sparse and I would like
    Message 1 of 4 , May 2, 2012
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      Namaste.

      I am back with yet another naming inquiry. I am attempting to create a male Chola (Tamil) style name. Documentation is a bit sparse and I would like some opinions on name formation.

      My current "working" name: Vijayalaya Kundavi Sundara

      Sources:

      Vijayalaya =
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vijayalaya_Chola [King's Name]

      Kundavi = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parantaka_Chola_II [King's Child Name], http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajaraja_Chola_I [King's Child Name]

      Sundara = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parantaka_Chola_II [King's Other Middle Name]

      Format = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parantaka_Chola_II [King's Other Name Format],http://www.doomchicken.net/~ursula/sca/onomastics/tamil/ [Several Examples]

      Does this name fit with Chola naming practices?

      Thank you for your assistance.

      -Julian
    • Eric Munson
      You are ahead of me, my friend. I wimped out (for the time being) and am simply Mokan of Thanjavur . Lame, but maybe OK for now as my persona travels on
      Message 2 of 4 , May 2, 2012
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        You are ahead of me, my friend. I wimped out (for the time being) and
        am simply 'Mokan of Thanjavur'. Lame, but maybe OK for now as my
        persona travels on business a lot. We simply went with temple
        inscriptions for my and my lady's names. (and everyone calls me Mo
        from my last persona so it made sense). I look forward to hearing
        what our sages say about your work!

        - Mokan Farb-dasa




        On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 3:37 PM, Julian O Neill <joneill@...> wrote:
        > Namaste.
        >
        > I am back with yet another naming inquiry. I am attempting to create a male Chola (Tamil) style name. Documentation is a bit sparse and I would like some opinions on name formation.
        >
        > My current "working" name: Vijayalaya Kundavi Sundara
        >
        > Sources:
        >
        > Vijayalaya =
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vijayalaya_Chola [King's Name]
        >
        > Kundavi = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parantaka_Chola_II [King's Child Name], http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajaraja_Chola_I [King's Child Name]
        >
        > Sundara = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parantaka_Chola_II [King's Other Middle Name]
        >
        > Format = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parantaka_Chola_II [King's Other Name Format],http://www.doomchicken.net/~ursula/sca/onomastics/tamil/ [Several Examples]
        >
        > Does this name fit with Chola naming practices?
        >
        > Thank you for your assistance.
        >
        > -Julian
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > SCA_India Mailing List Info:
        >  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA_India
        >                       or
        >  List owner:   SCA_India-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >



        --
        "Honor is what no man can give ye, and no one can take away. Honor is
        a man's gift to himself."  - Rob Roy, 1995 film
      • Eva Grammer
        How does anyone find out about naming practices in medieval India, anyway? Especially for females, as many times women were not considered to be important
        Message 3 of 4 , May 2, 2012
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          How does anyone find out about naming practices in medieval India, anyway?  Especially for females, as many times women were not considered to be important enough to write about?  

          My given name, Sumitra, I found on a list in the "Files" section of the group for Rajasthani names, I believe it was, and I have also found that Sumitra was one of the wives of Rama's father, and fathered Rama's best friend (can't remember his name).  But as far as a surname or anything, I have no clue.  I am prepared to go Mo's route and pick a likely city and just be "of ____," lol.

          Sumitra

          On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 4:07 PM, Eric Munson <theridion@...> wrote:
           

          You are ahead of me, my friend. I wimped out (for the time being) and
          am simply 'Mokan of Thanjavur'. Lame, but maybe OK for now as my
          persona travels on business a lot. We simply went with temple
          inscriptions for my and my lady's names. (and everyone calls me Mo
          from my last persona so it made sense). I look forward to hearing
          what our sages say about your work!

          - Mokan Farb-dasa


        • Beth
          ... Not always. :) Mileage varies based on time and place, but there s quite a lot of cases to women s names being mentioned in epigraphs. Devadasis (or
          Message 4 of 4 , May 9, 2012
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            On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 5:51 PM, Eva Grammer <eegrammer@...> wrote:
             

            How does anyone find out about naming practices in medieval India, anyway?  Especially for females, as many times women were not considered to be important enough to write about?  



            Not always.  :) 
             
            Mileage varies based on time and place, but there's quite a lot of cases to women's names being mentioned in epigraphs.  Devadasis (or other titles with a similar social position - varies by language/region) - are commonly featured on temple walls as donors and recipients in temple economies.  They are often the oddball, as a prominent feature of a "temple woman" - a sort of wider net that includes devadasis - is that she's a woman who is listed without affiliation with a man, having status in her own right. 
             
            But there's also plenty of references to the acts of women who ARE affiliated with men - queens who are noted for various traits (beauty, dancing skills, etc.) and satis - women who committed suicide as part of widowhood.  Not quite the thing you want to emulate on a daily basis, but if you are trying to pick a name and document it's structure, that's less of a big deal. 
             
            The most common sources of documentation are stone in terms of temple, palace or other governmental building walls, and copper plate inscriptions.  Vairavi and Eleanor did excellent work many years ago tracing through a giant repository of such epigraphs and citing a huge chunk of names from Tamil Nadu.
             
             
            But there's quite a few others on the Academy of St. Gabriel -
             
             
            For the most part, the reasons that St. Gabriel only hosts a few regions is that this is where volunteer research has contributed... certainly the status and annotations of women's names changes radically when we're talking about a Muslim-dominated era... but even in the North, there's plenty of Hindu and Jain eras that probably suffer only due to someone digging up sources and going forward with the painful work of collecting them.
             
            In a weird way, right now, the info available for women's names is actually a lot easier to find (in the SCA) simply because the majority of list members and active researchers in the SCA for India have been female - so guys have gotten the short end of the stick.  Sorry guys!
             
             
            -Lakshmi
             
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