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On Cholis and Dhotis

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  • Julian O Neill
    Yesterday was my first time wearing a dhoti to an SCA event. My garb for the event was half Indian : I wore a tunic and a dhoti. The dhoti was an old piece of
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 1, 2012
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      Yesterday was my first time wearing a dhoti to an SCA event. My garb for the event was "half Indian": I wore a tunic and a dhoti. The dhoti was an old piece of 4 yd x 50" linen fabric that I had purchased for other projects. It took a while to figure out how a dhoti actually operates. However, once I figured out the basics, I quickly fell in love with the garment.

      1. Dhoti Dimensions - I have been having some difficulty finding good dimensions for a dhoti. I know it's generally a rectangular piece of fabric around 4 yards long. However, I have no information as to how wide the fabric should be. Does anyone have good dimensions for a dhoti?

      2. Male Cholis - Is there precedent for these types of garments around the Chola period? If so, what's the best method for making a pattern? I plan to go topless to events and want to find something period-esque that I can use for the "no shirt=no service" scenarios.

      Thank you again for your assistance.

      -Julian
    • Jessica Tucker
      Hi Julian, Congrats on the garb experiment, it sounds like a lot of fun! Currently, a dhoti is 4 yards by about 44 inches. Plenty of men in Bangalore still
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 1, 2012
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        Hi Julian,
        Congrats on the garb experiment, it sounds like a lot of fun!

        Currently, a dhoti is 4 yards by about 44 inches. Plenty of men in Bangalore still wear either dhoti or lungi on a daily basis, so they're available in lots of stores, or mail-order. I'm not sure if the fabric width varied historically.

        Namaskaara,
        Flori

        On 01-Apr-2012 10:02 PM, "Julian O Neill" <joneill@...> wrote:

        Yesterday was my first time wearing a dhoti to an SCA event. My garb for the event was "half Indian": I wore a tunic and a dhoti. The dhoti was an old piece of 4 yd x 50" linen fabric that I had purchased for other projects. It took a while to figure out how a dhoti actually operates. However, once I figured out the basics, I quickly fell in love with the garment.

        1. Dhoti Dimensions - I have been having some difficulty finding good dimensions for a dhoti. I know it's generally a rectangular piece of fabric around 4 yards long. However, I have no information as to how wide the fabric should be. Does anyone have good dimensions for a dhoti?

        2. Male Cholis - Is there precedent for these types of garments around the Chola period? If so, what's the best method for making a pattern? I plan to go topless to events and want to find something period-esque that I can use for the "no shirt=no service" scenarios.

        Thank you again for your assistance.

        -Julian

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      • Shana McCoy
        According to the book The Body Adorned it was perfectly Indian of you to wear a tunic with your dhoti. There are a couple gold coins from the Gupta dynasty
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 1, 2012
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          According to the book The Body Adorned it was perfectly Indian of you to wear a tunic with your dhoti. There are a couple gold coins from the Gupta dynasty that show a king wearing a long dhoti with a tunic. I know it's not Chola but at least it's Indian :)

          As for men in cholis, yes there are a few examples of it. In the Ajanta caves there are paintings of male warriors in cholis, also I remember seeing a base relief  of Durga from a southern temple where some of her male minions wore cholis. I don't have any books with me right now, I'm on my lunch break, but if you want I can site my sources when I get home.

          Congratulations on your first dhoti, I love them!

          --Lalitadasa 

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Apr 1, 2012, at 12:31 PM, Julian O Neill <joneill@...> wrote:

           

          Yesterday was my first time wearing a dhoti to an SCA event. My garb for the event was "half Indian": I wore a tunic and a dhoti. The dhoti was an old piece of 4 yd x 50" linen fabric that I had purchased for other projects. It took a while to figure out how a dhoti actually operates. However, once I figured out the basics, I quickly fell in love with the garment.

          1. Dhoti Dimensions - I have been having some difficulty finding good dimensions for a dhoti. I know it's generally a rectangular piece of fabric around 4 yards long. However, I have no information as to how wide the fabric should be. Does anyone have good dimensions for a dhoti?

          2. Male Cholis - Is there precedent for these types of garments around the Chola period? If so, what's the best method for making a pattern? I plan to go topless to events and want to find something period-esque that I can use for the "no shirt=no service" scenarios.

          Thank you again for your assistance.

          -Julian

        • Julian O Neill
          Good to know that my old universal tunic is still quasi-period for my Indian persona. Thank you for the male choli information. I am going to try and make a
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 1, 2012
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            Good to know that my old "universal" tunic is still quasi-period for my Indian persona.

            Thank you for the male choli information. I am going to try and make a few cholis for those "top required" areas. Does anyone know of a good choli pattern to use and how to modify it to fit a man? Overall, I am looking for a choli design that is simple and with "easy access."

            Thank you once again.

            -Julian

            On Apr 1, 2012, at 1:31 PM, Shana McCoy wrote:

             

            According to the book The Body Adorned it was perfectly Indian of you to wear a tunic with your dhoti. There are a couple gold coins from the Gupta dynasty that show a king wearing a long dhoti with a tunic. I know it's not Chola but at least it's Indian :)

            As for men in cholis, yes there are a few examples of it. In the Ajanta caves there are paintings of male warriors in cholis, also I remember seeing a base relief  of Durga from a southern temple where some of her male minions wore cholis. I don't have any books with me right now, I'm on my lunch break, but if you want I can site my sources when I get home.

            Congratulations on your first dhoti, I love them!

            --Lalitadasa 

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Apr 1, 2012, at 12:31 PM, Julian O Neill <joneill@...> wrote:

             

            Yesterday was my first time wearing a dhoti to an SCA event. My garb for the event was "half Indian": I wore a tunic and a dhoti. The dhoti was an old piece of 4 yd x 50" linen fabric that I had purchased for other projects. It took a while to figure out how a dhoti actually operates. However, once I figured out the basics, I quickly fell in love with the garment.

            1. Dhoti Dimensions - I have been having some difficulty finding good dimensions for a dhoti. I know it's generally a rectangular piece of fabric around 4 yards long. However, I have no information as to how wide the fabric should be. Does anyone have good dimensions for a dhoti?

            2. Male Cholis - Is there precedent for these types of garments around the Chola period? If so, what's the best method for making a pattern? I plan to go topless to events and want to find something period-esque that I can use for the "no shirt=no service" scenarios.

            Thank you again for your assistance.

            -Julian



          • Jennifer Munson
            As I think someone else commented, the Ajanta cave paintings, while significantly North of where you re targetting, show men wearing a tunic with dhoti, and
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 2, 2012
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              As I think someone else commented, the Ajanta cave paintings, while significantly North of where you're targetting, show men wearing a tunic with dhoti, and that is the style Mokan has adopted as a "default" outfit for his persona. We've been trying out patterns to recreate a "four-point tunic" effect, where the tunic hangs to mid-thigh center front and curves down to points at the sides that are about knee-level. The sides of the tunic are slit from the waist down, hence the 4 points - 2 on the sides of the front piece and 2 on the sides of the back piece.

              I have also seen some temple paintings that show men with a short-sleeve cropped top (with a short wrapped garment on bottom) that could be called a "choli". The style features a scooped neckline. The neckline and sleeve openings (which hit mid-bicep) are decorated with matching patterns. I don't recall the bottom being decorated... I'll have to find the reference and post it.

              I don't think you should start with a women's pattern and try to engineer it for the male body. There is no need for support of the chest area on a man, and therefore your garment should not (IMHO) have a chest tie.  I believe you should instead be going for a pattern which covers front and back. It should be snug, but cut loosely enough and of a fabric with enough give to it that it can be slipped on over the head. If you already have a T-tunic pattern that fits, simply make one with short sleeves that ends below the chest. Try it on inside-out, and pin the sides (and sleeve if necessary) tighter until they are as tight as you can make it and still get it on and off without causing yourself too much damage. Also consider cutting your pattern on the bias (diagonally compared to the selvedges of your fabric) for additional stretch. You'll probably need very large underarm gussets.

              Ariyanangai

              On Sun, Apr 1, 2012 at 12:31 PM, Julian O Neill <joneill@...> wrote:
               

              Yesterday was my first time wearing a dhoti to an SCA event. My garb for the event was "half Indian": I wore a tunic and a dhoti. The dhoti was an old piece of 4 yd x 50" linen fabric that I had purchased for other projects. It took a while to figure out how a dhoti actually operates. However, once I figured out the basics, I quickly fell in love with the garment.

              1. Dhoti Dimensions - I have been having some difficulty finding good dimensions for a dhoti. I know it's generally a rectangular piece of fabric around 4 yards long. However, I have no information as to how wide the fabric should be. Does anyone have good dimensions for a dhoti?

              2. Male Cholis - Is there precedent for these types of garments around the Chola period? If so, what's the best method for making a pattern? I plan to go topless to events and want to find something period-esque that I can use for the "no shirt=no service" scenarios.

              Thank you again for your assistance.

              -Julian


            • Charles
              IMO, those points are caused by cutting the bottom straight instead of curved, or by adding gores that are not curved on the bottom and using the bias edge on
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 2, 2012
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                IMO, those points are caused by cutting the bottom straight instead of curved, or by adding gores that are not curved on the bottom and using the bias edge on the sides. I made a jama that way using very light Indian cotton and th bias edge really stretched out and made points.

                If you do this with lightweight, loose weave, natural finished fabrics the bias stretches much more than if you used the more tightly woven fabrics typically used for most sewing.

                Rashid


                --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Munson <munson.jennifer@...> wrote:
                >
                We've been trying out patterns to recreate a "four-point
                > tunic" effect, where the tunic hangs to mid-thigh center front and curves
                > down to points at the sides that are about knee-level. The sides of the
                > tunic are slit from the waist down, hence the 4 points - 2 on the sides of
                > the front piece and 2 on the sides of the back piece.
                >
              • Jennifer Munson
                I agree on the loose weave and the bias cut. I think that s how they were able to get that 4-point look and also how they were able to make form-fitting upper
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 3, 2012
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                  I agree on the loose weave and the bias cut. I think that's how they
                  were able to get that 4-point look and also how they were able to make
                  form-fitting upper garments with no apparent fasteners. The looseness
                  of the weave has also got to be a factor in wrapped lower garments
                  seen on Chola bronze figures that are so form-fitting they're almost
                  not there.

                  But I've had some trouble finding fabrics that are sleazy enough to
                  drape properly, so none of my attempts so far have turned out exactly
                  as I'd like them yet.

                  -Ariyanangai

                  On 4/3/12, Charles <unclrashid@...> wrote:
                  > IMO, those points are caused by cutting the bottom straight instead of
                  > curved, or by adding gores that are not curved on the bottom and using the
                  > bias edge on the sides. I made a jama that way using very light Indian
                  > cotton and th bias edge really stretched out and made points.
                  >
                  > If you do this with lightweight, loose weave, natural finished fabrics the
                  > bias stretches much more than if you used the more tightly woven fabrics
                  > typically used for most sewing.
                  >
                  > Rashid
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Munson <munson.jennifer@...>
                  > wrote:
                  >>
                  > We've been trying out patterns to recreate a "four-point
                  >> tunic" effect, where the tunic hangs to mid-thigh center front and curves
                  >> down to points at the sides that are about knee-level. The sides of the
                  >> tunic are slit from the waist down, hence the 4 points - 2 on the sides of
                  >> the front piece and 2 on the sides of the back piece.
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  --
                  Sent from my mobile device
                • Charles
                  I was fortunate in finding real indian cottons on sale at Jo-mar many years ago. (semi-sheer, slightly slubby, tone-on-tone stripes and grids, alsmost looked
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 4, 2012
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                    I was fortunate in finding real indian cottons on sale at Jo-mar many years ago. (semi-sheer, slightly slubby, tone-on-tone stripes and grids, alsmost looked like tussah) They probably ended up at Jo-mar because they were colors that were not in style at the time. As always, a few years later I wished I had bought more!

                    Rashid

                    --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Munson <munson.jennifer@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I agree on the loose weave and the bias cut. I think that's how they
                    > were able to get that 4-point look and also how they were able to make
                    > form-fitting upper garments with no apparent fasteners. The looseness
                    > of the weave has also got to be a factor in wrapped lower garments
                    > seen on Chola bronze figures that are so form-fitting they're almost
                    > not there.
                    >
                    > But I've had some trouble finding fabrics that are sleazy enough to
                    > drape properly, so none of my attempts so far have turned out exactly
                    > as I'd like them yet.
                    >
                    > -Ariyanangai
                    >
                    >
                  • Julian O Neill
                    I was making cholis yesterday and decided to make them sleeveless. Is there a period precedent for sleeveless cholis? Thank you for your assistance. -Julian
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 7, 2012
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                      I was making cholis yesterday and decided to make them sleeveless. Is there a period precedent for sleeveless cholis?

                      Thank you for your assistance.

                      -Julian

                      On Apr 2, 2012, at 8:50 AM, Jennifer Munson wrote:

                       

                      I have also seen some temple paintings that show men with a short-sleeve cropped top (with a short wrapped garment on bottom) that could be called a "choli". The style features a scooped neckline. The neckline and sleeve openings (which hit mid-bicep) are decorated with matching patterns. I don't recall the bottom being decorated... I'll have to find the reference and post it.


                    • Jim and Andi Houston
                      I have to say, I have never seen a sleeveless upper garment on a woman in a painting or on a statue, but every time we say that did not exist! we find one a
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 8, 2012
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                        I have to say, I have never seen a sleeveless upper garment on a woman in a painting or on a statue, but every time we say “that did not exist!” we find one a few weeks later.

                         

                        Is your choli pattern a support garment? In the pattern I use, the sleeves are important to the structure and “lift”; I wouldn’t be able to remove the sleeves.

                         

                        Madhavi

                         

                        From: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_India@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Julian O Neill
                        Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2012 12:32 PM
                        To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [SCA_India] Sleeveless Cholis - On Cholis and Dhotis

                         

                         

                        I was making cholis yesterday and decided to make them sleeveless. Is there a period precedent for sleeveless cholis?

                         

                        Thank you for your assistance.

                         

                        -Julian

                         

                        On Apr 2, 2012, at 8:50 AM, Jennifer Munson wrote:



                         

                        I have also seen some temple paintings that show men with a short-sleeve cropped top (with a short wrapped garment on bottom) that could be called a "choli". The style features a scooped neckline. The neckline and sleeve openings (which hit mid-bicep) are decorated with matching patterns. I don't recall the bottom being decorated... I'll have to find the reference and post it.

                         

                        No virus found in this message.
                        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                        Version: 2012.0.1913 / Virus Database: 2411/4922 - Release Date: 04/08/12

                      • Julian O Neill
                        The choli that I am making is a male choli. It does not provide any support. It is designed to be a quick and easy cover up for use where topless is either
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 8, 2012
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                          The choli that I am making is a male choli. It does not provide any support. It is designed to be a quick and easy cover up for use where "topless" is either unwelcome or not practical.

                          -Julian

                          On Apr 8, 2012, at 2:01 PM, Jim and Andi Houston wrote:

                           

                          I have to say, I have never seen a sleeveless upper garment on a woman in a painting or on a statue, but every time we say “that did not exist!” we find one a few weeks later.

                           

                          Is your choli pattern a support garment? In the pattern I use, the sleeves are important to the structure and “lift”; I wouldn’t be able to remove the sleeves.

                           

                          Madhavi

                           

                          From: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_India@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Julian O Neill
                          Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2012 12:32 PM
                          To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [SCA_India] Sleeveless Cholis - On Cholis and Dhotis

                           

                           

                          I was making cholis yesterday and decided to make them sleeveless. Is there a period precedent for sleeveless cholis?

                           

                          Thank you for your assistance.

                           

                          -Julian

                           

                          On Apr 2, 2012, at 8:50 AM, Jennifer Munson wrote:



                           

                          I have also seen some temple paintings that show men with a short-sleeve cropped top (with a short wrapped garment on bottom) that could be called a "choli". The style features a scooped neckline. The neckline and sleeve openings (which hit mid-bicep) are decorated with matching patterns. I don't recall the bottom being decorated... I'll have to find the reference and post it.

                           

                          No virus found in this message.
                          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                          Version: 2012.0.1913 / Virus Database: 2411/4922 - Release Date: 04/08/12



                        • Shana McCoy
                          All the men s cholis I ve seen are short sleeved come to about mid-ribcage in length with round necklines. I have never seen a sleeveless choli either, but I
                          Message 12 of 14 , Apr 8, 2012
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                            All the men's cholis I've seen are short sleeved come to about mid-ribcage in length with round necklines. I have never seen a sleeveless choli either, but I have seen one or two stannipattas with straps. Alas, stannipattas are only on women, at least as far as I know.

                            Lalitadasa 

                            Sent from my iPhone

                            On Apr 8, 2012, at 4:18 PM, Julian O Neill <joneill@...> wrote:

                             

                            The choli that I am making is a male choli. It does not provide any support. It is designed to be a quick and easy cover up for use where "topless" is either unwelcome or not practical.

                            -Julian

                            On Apr 8, 2012, at 2:01 PM, Jim and Andi Houston wrote:

                             

                            I have to say, I have never seen a sleeveless upper garment on a woman in a painting or on a statue, but every time we say “that did not exist!” we find one a few weeks later.

                             

                            Is your choli pattern a support garment? In the pattern I use, the sleeves are important to the structure and “lift”; I wouldn’t be able to remove the sleeves.

                             

                            Madhavi

                             

                            From: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_India@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Julian O Neill
                            Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2012 12:32 PM
                            To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [SCA_India] Sleeveless Cholis - On Cholis and Dhotis

                             

                             

                            I was making cholis yesterday and decided to make them sleeveless. Is there a period precedent for sleeveless cholis?

                             

                            Thank you for your assistance.

                             

                            -Julian

                             

                            On Apr 2, 2012, at 8:50 AM, Jennifer Munson wrote:



                             

                            I have also seen some temple paintings that show men with a short-sleeve cropped top (with a short wrapped garment on bottom) that could be called a "choli". The style features a scooped neckline. The neckline and sleeve openings (which hit mid-bicep) are decorated with matching patterns. I don't recall the bottom being decorated... I'll have to find the reference and post it.

                             

                            No virus found in this message.
                            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                            Version: 2012.0.1913 / Virus Database: 2411/4922 - Release Date: 04/08/12



                          • Sandra
                            what are stannipattas? I can t find any references whatsoever.
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jul 12, 2012
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                              what are stannipattas? I can't find any references whatsoever.


                              --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Shana McCoy <LalitaDasa@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > All the men's cholis I've seen are short sleeved come to about mid-ribcage in length with round necklines. I have never seen a sleeveless choli either, but I have seen one or two stannipattas with straps. Alas, stannipattas are only on women, at least as far as I know.
                              >
                              > Lalitadasa
                              >
                              > Sent from my iPhone
                              >
                              > On Apr 8, 2012, at 4:18 PM, Julian O Neill <joneill@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > The choli that I am making is a male choli. It does not provide any support. It is designed to be a quick and easy cover up for use where "topless" is either unwelcome or not practical.
                              > >
                              > > -Julian
                              > >
                              > > On Apr 8, 2012, at 2:01 PM, Jim and Andi Houston wrote:
                              > >
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> I have to say, I have never seen a sleeveless upper garment on a woman in a painting or on a statue, but every time we say “that did not exist!” we find one a few weeks later.
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> Is your choli pattern a support garment? In the pattern I use, the sleeves are important to the structure and “lift”; I wouldn’t be able to remove the sleeves.
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> Madhavi
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> From: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_India@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Julian O Neill
                              > >> Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2012 12:32 PM
                              > >> To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                              > >> Subject: [SCA_India] Sleeveless Cholis - On Cholis and Dhotis
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> I was making cholis yesterday and decided to make them sleeveless. Is there a period precedent for sleeveless cholis?
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> Thank you for your assistance.
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> -Julian
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> On Apr 2, 2012, at 8:50 AM, Jennifer Munson wrote:
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> I have also seen some temple paintings that show men with a short-sleeve cropped top (with a short wrapped garment on bottom) that could be called a "choli". The style features a scooped neckline. The neckline and sleeve openings (which hit mid-bicep) are decorated with matching patterns. I don't recall the bottom being decorated... I'll have to find the reference and post it.
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >> No virus found in this message.
                              > >> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                              > >> Version: 2012.0.1913 / Virus Database: 2411/4922 - Release Date: 04/08/12
                              > >>
                              > >>
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • lalitadasa@gmail.com
                              It s a breast band seen on some sculpture and a few paintings. Imagine a tube top that s only about two inches wide, goes over the nipples but doesn t cover
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jul 12, 2012
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                                It's a breast band seen on some sculpture and a few paintings. Imagine a tube top that's only about two inches wide, goes over the nipples but doesn't cover them and ties in the back (we think).

                                Lalitadasa
                                Sent from my PANTECH Burst™ on AT&T

                                Sandra &lt;ladythornewood@...&gt; wrote:

                                 

                                what are stannipattas? I can't find any references whatsoever.

                                --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, Shana McCoy <LalitaDasa@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > All the men's cholis I've seen are short sleeved come to about mid-ribcage in length with round necklines. I have never seen a sleeveless choli either, but I have seen one or two stannipattas with straps. Alas, stannipattas are only on women, at least as far as I know.
                                >
                                > Lalitadasa
                                >
                                > Sent from my iPhone
                                >
                                > On Apr 8, 2012, at 4:18 PM, Julian O Neill <joneill@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > > The choli that I am making is a male choli. It does not provide any support. It is designed to be a quick and easy cover up for use where "topless" is either unwelcome or not practical.
                                > >
                                > > -Julian
                                > >
                                > > On Apr 8, 2012, at 2:01 PM, Jim and Andi Houston wrote:
                                > >
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> I have to say, I have never seen a sleeveless upper garment on a woman in a painting or on a statue, but every time we say “that did not exist!” we find one a few weeks later.
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> Is your choli pattern a support garment? In the pattern I use, the sleeves are important to the structure and “lift”; I wouldn’t be able to remove the sleeves.
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> Madhavi
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> From: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_India@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Julian O Neill
                                > >> Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2012 12:32 PM
                                > >> To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                                > >> Subject: [SCA_India] Sleeveless Cholis - On Cholis and Dhotis
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> I was making cholis yesterday and decided to make them sleeveless. Is there a period precedent for sleeveless cholis?
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> Thank you for your assistance.
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> -Julian
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> On Apr 2, 2012, at 8:50 AM, Jennifer Munson wrote:
                                > >>
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                                > >>
                                > >> I have also seen some temple paintings that show men with a short-sleeve cropped top (with a short wrapped garment on bottom) that could be called a "choli". The style features a scooped neckline. The neckline and sleeve openings (which hit mid-bicep) are decorated with matching patterns. I don't recall the bottom being decorated... I'll have to find the reference and post it.
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >> No virus found in this message.
                                > >> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                > >> Version: 2012.0.1913 / Virus Database: 2411/4922 - Release Date: 04/08/12
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >
                                > >
                                >

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