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an intro

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  • countessinn@verizon.net
    Greetings one and all, I’ve been reading this (currently quiet) list for a few weeks now and even did my homework; I’ve read most of the last two or three
    Message 1 of 16 , May 6, 2010
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      Greetings one and all,

      I’ve been reading this (currently quiet) list for a few weeks now and even
      did
      my homework; I’ve read most of the last two or three years’ worth of posts
      to
      obviate newbie questions and get the overall tone of the “room.” Time for
      an
      intro.

      I’m Henna Sinclair of the Barony of Bergental in the East Kingdom. Before
      my
      first Pennsic (36), someone mentioned that some folks wear Indian in the
      warm
      weather; it seemed like an elegant garb solution. I further decided to
      make my
      cholis from linen, because you can hardly go wrong with linen at Pennsic?
      So I
      discovered Sari Safari and bought the very best very RED sari I could
      afford for
      dressy Pennsicwear. Being a textile artist/geek already, I was enchanted
      by the
      handspun, handwoven fabric, and my historical segue was begun. A couple of
      years ago, at Sommer Draw, another Indian (lovely lady, don’t remember her
      name)
      complimented me on my sari, to which I replied that it was just for the
      warm
      weather. “Yes,” she replied, “That’s how it usually begins.” Well, bravo,
      well
      spotted. I was asked by someone at Birka this year why I “always wore
      sarees”
      if my persona was English? And I’ve been, ahem, strongly encouraged by my
      favorite local peers to do Indian better, if I was going to continue doing
      it,
      rather than just wearing a sari and slapping on a stick-on bindi.

      Naturally, I’m inspired to come at the subject via the textiles, and though
      I’m
      keenly aware that “traditional” is not the same as “period,” at least it’s
      a
      place to start. It’s also become quite obvious that this is more than a
      mere
      garb dalliance, and so I am building a basic alternate persona, perhaps for
      all
      warm weather—Indian Summer?—or maybe just whenever the mood strikes. Still
      need
      to read some history of the area, but have settled on a few things.
      Location:
      Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu (hi, Vairavi!). Occupation: spinner. Hindu. I’m
      lacking a name. I know that researching almost anything Indian is an
      exercise
      in endurance given the religious, political, geographical, tribal,
      language, and
      caste issues, to name a few. I had a fantasy that I could construct a name
      that
      is at least a nod toward my primary name, but I imagine that that’s
      extremely
      ambitious. I don’t want to just take something straight from someone
      else’s
      research without doing any on my own, but neither do I want to reinvent the
      proverbial wheel.

      Another area of interest is food…Indian food is such an amalgamation of
      formerly-foreign foodstuffs again, it’s hard to know where to begin. No
      peppers, or other nightshades. One wonders about beans, of course, too.
      It’s
      all just mind-boggling, but I continue to be fixated on the idea of doing
      an
      Indian-inspired dayboard in the next year.

      I’m mostly just looking for pointers in the right direction—any books that
      are
      must-reads, or stay-away-froms. I have the book “Indian Textiles” ordered.

      Others I’ll pick up when I can, and comb what bibliographies I find for
      clues as
      to where the heck to go from here.

      And one further question: will there be any sort of meet-and-greet at
      Pennsic?

      Namaste,
      Henna


      --------------------------------------------------------------------
      mail2web.com – What can On Demand Business Solutions do for you?
      http://link.mail2web.com/Business/SharePoint
    • lalitadasa@gmail.com
      Welcome Henna! For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and
      Message 2 of 16 , May 6, 2010
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        Welcome Henna!

        For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and if I remember right pepper is period (at least i am sure its mentioned in the Kamasutra which is a 4th century text).

        As for stick on bindis.... Please avoid.... To me these are a massive pet peeve. If we do meet at pennsic this year get me to tell you that story. ;)

        Again, welcome to our community.
        Lalitadasa
        -----Original Message-----
        Date: Thursday, May 06, 2010 5:12:59 pm
        To: sca_india@yahoogroups.com
        From: "countessinn@..." <countessinn@...>
        Subject: [SCA_India] an intro

        Greetings one and all,

        I’ve been reading this (currently quiet) list for a few weeks now and even
        did
        my homework; I’ve read most of the last two or three years’ worth of posts
        to
        obviate newbie questions and get the overall tone of the “room.” Time for
        an
        intro.

        I’m Henna Sinclair of the Barony of Bergental in the East Kingdom. Before
        my
        first Pennsic (36), someone mentioned that some folks wear Indian in the
        warm
        weather; it seemed like an elegant garb solution. I further decided to
        make my
        cholis from linen, because you can hardly go wrong with linen at Pennsic?
        So I
        discovered Sari Safari and bought the very best very RED sari I could
        afford for
        dressy Pennsicwear. Being a textile artist/geek already, I was enchanted
        by the
        handspun, handwoven fabric, and my historical segue was begun. A couple of
        years ago, at Sommer Draw, another Indian (lovely lady, don’t remember her
        name)
        complimented me on my sari, to which I replied that it was just for the
        warm
        weather. “Yes,” she replied, “That’s how it usually begins.” Well, bravo,
        well
        spotted. I was asked by someone at Birka this year why I “always wore
        sarees”
        if my persona was English? And I’ve been, ahem, strongly encouraged by my
        favorite local peers to do Indian better, if I was going to continue doing
        it,
        rather than just wearing a sari and slapping on a stick-on bindi.

        Naturally, I’m inspired to come at the subject via the textiles, and though
        I’m
        keenly aware that “traditional” is not the same as “period,” at least it’s
        a
        place to start. It’s also become quite obvious that this is more than a
        mere
        garb dalliance, and so I am building a basic alternate persona, perhaps for
        all
        warm weather—Indian Summer?—or maybe just whenever the mood strikes. Still
        need
        to read some history of the area, but have settled on a few things.
        Location:
        Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu (hi, Vairavi!). Occupation: spinner. Hindu. I’m
        lacking a name. I know that researching almost anything Indian is an
        exercise
        in endurance given the religious, political, geographical, tribal,
        language, and
        caste issues, to name a few. I had a fantasy that I could construct a name
        that
        is at least a nod toward my primary name, but I imagine that that’s
        extremely
        ambitious. I don’t want to just take something straight from someone
        else’s
        research without doing any on my own, but neither do I want to reinvent the
        proverbial wheel.

        Another area of interest is food…Indian food is such an amalgamation of
        formerly-foreign foodstuffs again, it’s hard to know where to begin. No
        peppers, or other nightshades. One wonders about beans, of course, too.
        It’s
        all just mind-boggling, but I continue to be fixated on the idea of doing
        an
        Indian-inspired dayboard in the next year.

        I’m mostly just looking for pointers in the right direction—any books that
        are
        must-reads, or stay-away-froms. I have the book “Indian Textiles” ordered.

        Others I’ll pick up when I can, and comb what bibliographies I find for
        clues as
        to where the heck to go from here.

        And one further question: will there be any sort of meet-and-greet at
        Pennsic?

        Namaste,
        Henna


        --------------------------------------------------------------------
        mail2web.com – What can On Demand Business Solutions do for you?
        http://link.mail2web.com/Business/SharePoint
      • Elewyiss the Jew
        Henna! Welcome, I m Tevi and I m from Chola Dynasty Tamil. I found my name in Vairavi s name database (
        Message 3 of 16 , May 6, 2010
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          Henna! Welcome, I"m Tevi and I'm from Chola Dynasty Tamil. I found my name in Vairavi's name database (http://sites.google.com/site/vairavisca/Home/creations/indian-name-research) I am just starting my research so I tend to have more questions than answers, but this is a great place to learn.
           
           

           
          On Thu, May 6, 2010 at 5:23 PM, lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...> wrote:
           

          Welcome Henna!

          For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and if I remember right pepper is period (at least i am sure its mentioned in the Kamasutra which is a 4th century text).

          As for stick on bindis.... Please avoid.... To me these are a massive pet peeve. If we do meet at pennsic this year get me to tell you that story. ;)

          Again, welcome to our community.
          Lalitadasa


          -----Original Message-----
          Date: Thursday, May 06, 2010 5:12:59 pm
          To: sca_india@yahoogroups.com
          From: "countessinn@..." <countessinn@...>
          Subject: [SCA_India] an intro

          Greetings one and all,

          I’ve been reading this (currently quiet) list for a few weeks now and even
          did
          my homework; I’ve read most of the last two or three years’ worth of posts
          to
          obviate newbie questions and get the overall tone of the “room.” Time for
          an
          intro.

          I’m Henna Sinclair of the Barony of Bergental in the East Kingdom. Before
          my
          first Pennsic (36), someone mentioned that some folks wear Indian in the
          warm
          weather; it seemed like an elegant garb solution. I further decided to
          make my
          cholis from linen, because you can hardly go wrong with linen at Pennsic?
          So I
          discovered Sari Safari and bought the very best very RED sari I could
          afford for
          dressy Pennsicwear. Being a textile artist/geek already, I was enchanted
          by the
          handspun, handwoven fabric, and my historical segue was begun. A couple of
          years ago, at Sommer Draw, another Indian (lovely lady, don’t remember her
          name)
          complimented me on my sari, to which I replied that it was just for the
          warm
          weather. “Yes,” she replied, “That’s how it usually begins.” Well, bravo,
          well
          spotted. I was asked by someone at Birka this year why I “always wore
          sarees”
          if my persona was English? And I’ve been, ahem, strongly encouraged by my
          favorite local peers to do Indian better, if I was going to continue doing
          it,
          rather than just wearing a sari and slapping on a stick-on bindi.

          Naturally, I’m inspired to come at the subject via the textiles, and though
          I’m
          keenly aware that “traditional” is not the same as “period,” at least it’s
          a
          place to start. It’s also become quite obvious that this is more than a
          mere
          garb dalliance, and so I am building a basic alternate persona, perhaps for
          all
          warm weather—Indian Summer?—or maybe just whenever the mood strikes. Still
          need
          to read some history of the area, but have settled on a few things.
          Location:
          Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu (hi, Vairavi!). Occupation: spinner. Hindu. I’m
          lacking a name. I know that researching almost anything Indian is an
          exercise
          in endurance given the religious, political, geographical, tribal,
          language, and
          caste issues, to name a few. I had a fantasy that I could construct a name
          that
          is at least a nod toward my primary name, but I imagine that that’s
          extremely
          ambitious. I don’t want to just take something straight from someone
          else’s
          research without doing any on my own, but neither do I want to reinvent the
          proverbial wheel.

          Another area of interest is food…Indian food is such an amalgamation of
          formerly-foreign foodstuffs again, it’s hard to know where to begin. No
          peppers, or other nightshades. One wonders about beans, of course, too.
          It’s
          all just mind-boggling, but I continue to be fixated on the idea of doing
          an
          Indian-inspired dayboard in the next year.

          I’m mostly just looking for pointers in the right direction—any books that
          are
          must-reads, or stay-away-froms. I have the book “Indian Textiles” ordered.

          Others I’ll pick up when I can, and comb what bibliographies I find for
          clues as
          to where the heck to go from here.

          And one further question: will there be any sort of meet-and-greet at
          Pennsic?

          Namaste,
          Henna

          ----------------------------------------------------------
          mail2web.com – What can On Demand Business Solutions do for you?
          http://link.mail2web.com/Business/SharePoint




          --
          Ro'ah Chatulim
        • Lisa Emery
          I don t really like the way stick on bindis look, so I m curious, what would you recommend to use for bindis? ... From: lalitadasa@gmail.com
          Message 4 of 16 , May 6, 2010
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            I don't really like the way stick on bindis look, so I'm curious, what would you recommend to use for bindis?

            --- On Thu, 5/6/10, lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...> wrote:

            From: lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...>
            Subject: RE: [SCA_India] an intro
            To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, May 6, 2010, 4:23 PM

             

            Welcome Henna!

            For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and if I remember right pepper is period (at least i am sure its mentioned in the Kamasutra which is a 4th century text).

            As for stick on bindis.... Please avoid.... To me these are a massive pet peeve. If we do meet at pennsic this year get me to tell you that story. ;)

            Again, welcome to our community.
            Lalitadasa
            -----Original Message-----
            Date: Thursday, May 06, 2010 5:12:59 pm
            To: sca_india@yahoogrou ps.com
            From: "countessinn@ verizon.net" <countessinn@ verizon.net>
            Subject: [SCA_India] an intro

            Greetings one and all,

            I’ve been reading this (currently quiet) list for a few weeks now and even
            did
            my homework; I’ve read most of the last two or three years’ worth of posts
            to
            obviate newbie questions and get the overall tone of the “room.” Time for
            an
            intro.

            I’m Henna Sinclair of the Barony of Bergental in the East Kingdom. Before
            my
            first Pennsic (36), someone mentioned that some folks wear Indian in the
            warm
            weather; it seemed like an elegant garb solution. I further decided to
            make my
            cholis from linen, because you can hardly go wrong with linen at Pennsic?
            So I
            discovered Sari Safari and bought the very best very RED sari I could
            afford for
            dressy Pennsicwear. Being a textile artist/geek already, I was enchanted
            by the
            handspun, handwoven fabric, and my historical segue was begun. A couple of
            years ago, at Sommer Draw, another Indian (lovely lady, don’t remember her
            name)
            complimented me on my sari, to which I replied that it was just for the
            warm
            weather. “Yes,” she replied, “That’s how it usually begins.” Well, bravo,
            well
            spotted. I was asked by someone at Birka this year why I “always wore
            sarees”
            if my persona was English? And I’ve been, ahem, strongly encouraged by my
            favorite local peers to do Indian better, if I was going to continue doing
            it,
            rather than just wearing a sari and slapping on a stick-on bindi.

            Naturally, I’m inspired to come at the subject via the textiles, and though
            I’m
            keenly aware that “traditional” is not the same as “period,” at least it’s
            a
            place to start. It’s also become quite obvious that this is more than a
            mere
            garb dalliance, and so I am building a basic alternate persona, perhaps for
            all
            warm weather—Indian Summer?—or maybe just whenever the mood strikes. Still
            need
            to read some history of the area, but have settled on a few things.
            Location:
            Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu (hi, Vairavi!). Occupation: spinner. Hindu. I’m
            lacking a name. I know that researching almost anything Indian is an
            exercise
            in endurance given the religious, political, geographical, tribal,
            language, and
            caste issues, to name a few. I had a fantasy that I could construct a name
            that
            is at least a nod toward my primary name, but I imagine that that’s
            extremely
            ambitious. I don’t want to just take something straight from someone
            else’s
            research without doing any on my own, but neither do I want to reinvent the
            proverbial wheel.

            Another area of interest is food…Indian food is such an amalgamation of
            formerly-foreign foodstuffs again, it’s hard to know where to begin. No
            peppers, or other nightshades. One wonders about beans, of course, too.
            It’s
            all just mind-boggling, but I continue to be fixated on the idea of doing
            an
            Indian-inspired dayboard in the next year.

            I’m mostly just looking for pointers in the right direction—any books that
            are
            must-reads, or stay-away-froms. I have the book “Indian Textiles” ordered.

            Others I’ll pick up when I can, and comb what bibliographies I find for
            clues as
            to where the heck to go from here.

            And one further question: will there be any sort of meet-and-greet at
            Pennsic?

            Namaste,
            Henna

            ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
            mail2web.com – What can On Demand Business Solutions do for you?
            http://link. mail2web. com/Business/ SharePoint


          • JL Badgley
            On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 4:23 AM, lalitadasa@gmail.com ... Pepper is definitely period, including long pepper , which is what gave many foods the hot feeling
            Message 5 of 16 , May 6, 2010
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              On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 4:23 AM, lalitadasa@...
              <LalitaDasa@...> wrote:
              >
              > Welcome Henna!
              >
              > For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and if I remember right pepper is period (at least i am sure its mentioned in the Kamasutra which is a 4th century text).
              >

              Pepper is definitely period, including "long pepper", which is what
              gave many foods the "hot" feeling at the time. Chili "pepper" on the
              other hand is only period to the end of the 16th century, when it was
              brought over from the New World; many Europeans, though, forgot about
              the initial source of pepper and in the 18th or 19th centuries, I
              believe, started claiming that India/SE Asia was one of the native
              sources for chillies because of the prevalence in the food, but I
              believe this has since been debunked.


              -Ii Katsumori
            • margavati
              If you re interested in spices, I d recommend reading The Taste of Conquest by Michael Krondl; it s a modern book but is a fantastic resource for the history
              Message 6 of 16 , May 6, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                If you're interested in spices, I'd recommend reading The Taste of Conquest by Michael Krondl; it's a modern book but is a fantastic resource for the history of the spice trade, and gives a fairly good historical rundown of which spices were used when and where they came from, plus how capsicum peppers came to be introduced into India/China ~1650.

                (And also, welcome!)

                Margavati

                --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, "lalitadasa@..." <LalitaDasa@...> wrote:
                >
                > Welcome Henna!
                >
                > For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and if I remember right pepper is period (at least i am sure its mentioned in the Kamasutra which is a 4th century text).
                >
                > As for stick on bindis.... Please avoid.... To me these are a massive pet peeve. If we do meet at pennsic this year get me to tell you that story. ;)
                >
                > Again, welcome to our community.
                > Lalitadasa
                > -----Original Message-----
                > Date: Thursday, May 06, 2010 5:12:59 pm
                > To: sca_india@yahoogroups.com
                > From: "countessinn@..." <countessinn@...>
                > Subject: [SCA_India] an intro
                >
                > Greetings one and all,
                >
                > I�ve been reading this (currently quiet) list for a few weeks now and even
                > did
                > my homework; I�ve read most of the last two or three years� worth of posts
                > to
                > obviate newbie questions and get the overall tone of the �room.� Time for
                > an
                > intro.
                >
                > I�m Henna Sinclair of the Barony of Bergental in the East Kingdom. Before
                > my
                > first Pennsic (36), someone mentioned that some folks wear Indian in the
                > warm
                > weather; it seemed like an elegant garb solution. I further decided to
                > make my
                > cholis from linen, because you can hardly go wrong with linen at Pennsic?
                > So I
                > discovered Sari Safari and bought the very best very RED sari I could
                > afford for
                > dressy Pennsicwear. Being a textile artist/geek already, I was enchanted
                > by the
                > handspun, handwoven fabric, and my historical segue was begun. A couple of
                > years ago, at Sommer Draw, another Indian (lovely lady, don�t remember her
                > name)
                > complimented me on my sari, to which I replied that it was just for the
                > warm
                > weather. �Yes,� she replied, �That�s how it usually begins.� Well, bravo,
                > well
                > spotted. I was asked by someone at Birka this year why I �always wore
                > sarees�
                > if my persona was English? And I�ve been, ahem, strongly encouraged by my
                > favorite local peers to do Indian better, if I was going to continue doing
                > it,
                > rather than just wearing a sari and slapping on a stick-on bindi.
                >
                > Naturally, I�m inspired to come at the subject via the textiles, and though
                > I�m
                > keenly aware that �traditional� is not the same as �period,� at least it�s
                > a
                > place to start. It�s also become quite obvious that this is more than a
                > mere
                > garb dalliance, and so I am building a basic alternate persona, perhaps for
                > all
                > warm weather�Indian Summer?�or maybe just whenever the mood strikes. Still
                > need
                > to read some history of the area, but have settled on a few things.
                > Location:
                > Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu (hi, Vairavi!). Occupation: spinner. Hindu. I�m
                > lacking a name. I know that researching almost anything Indian is an
                > exercise
                > in endurance given the religious, political, geographical, tribal,
                > language, and
                > caste issues, to name a few. I had a fantasy that I could construct a name
                > that
                > is at least a nod toward my primary name, but I imagine that that�s
                > extremely
                > ambitious. I don�t want to just take something straight from someone
                > else�s
                > research without doing any on my own, but neither do I want to reinvent the
                > proverbial wheel.
                >
                > Another area of interest is food�Indian food is such an amalgamation of
                > formerly-foreign foodstuffs again, it�s hard to know where to begin. No
                > peppers, or other nightshades. One wonders about beans, of course, too.
                > It�s
                > all just mind-boggling, but I continue to be fixated on the idea of doing
                > an
                > Indian-inspired dayboard in the next year.
                >
                > I�m mostly just looking for pointers in the right direction�any books that
                > are
                > must-reads, or stay-away-froms. I have the book �Indian Textiles� ordered.
                >
                > Others I�ll pick up when I can, and comb what bibliographies I find for
                > clues as
                > to where the heck to go from here.
                >
                > And one further question: will there be any sort of meet-and-greet at
                > Pennsic?
                >
                > Namaste,
                > Henna
                >
                >
                > --------------------------------------------------------------------
                > mail2web.com � What can On Demand Business Solutions do for you?
                > http://link.mail2web.com/Business/SharePoint
                >
              • Laura Lawrence
                I m a n00b myself... but I was planning on using a lip-liner pencil to draw it on, since that s the closest thing I can easily find that gives the right kind
                Message 7 of 16 , May 6, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  I'm a n00b myself... but I was planning on using a lip-liner pencil to draw it on, since that's the closest thing I can easily find that gives the right kind of look (and isn't made of mercury).

                  Lilavati

                  On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 8:25 AM, Lisa Emery <zizilia85@...> wrote:
                   

                  I don't really like the way stick on bindis look, so I'm curious, what would you recommend to use for bindis?

                  --- On Thu, 5/6/10, lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...> wrote:

                  From: lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...>
                  Subject: RE: [SCA_India] an intro
                  To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Thursday, May 6, 2010, 4:23 PM

                   

                  Welcome Henna!

                  For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and if I remember right pepper is period (at least i am sure its mentioned in the Kamasutra which is a 4th century text).

                  As for stick on bindis.... Please avoid.... To me these are a massive pet peeve. If we do meet at pennsic this year get me to tell you that story. ;)

                  Again, welcome to our community.
                  Lalitadasa
                  -----Original Message-----
                  Date: Thursday, May 06, 2010 5:12:59 pm
                  To: sca_india@yahoogrou ps.com
                  From: "countessinn@ verizon.net" <countessinn@ verizon.net>
                  Subject: [SCA_India] an intro

                  Greetings one and all,

                  I’ve been reading this (currently quiet) list for a few weeks now and even
                  did
                  my homework; I’ve read most of the last two or three years’ worth of posts
                  to
                  obviate newbie questions and get the overall tone of the “room.” Time for
                  an
                  intro.

                  I’m Henna Sinclair of the Barony of Bergental in the East Kingdom. Before
                  my
                  first Pennsic (36), someone mentioned that some folks wear Indian in the
                  warm
                  weather; it seemed like an elegant garb solution. I further decided to
                  make my
                  cholis from linen, because you can hardly go wrong with linen at Pennsic?
                  So I
                  discovered Sari Safari and bought the very best very RED sari I could
                  afford for
                  dressy Pennsicwear. Being a textile artist/geek already, I was enchanted
                  by the
                  handspun, handwoven fabric, and my historical segue was begun. A couple of
                  years ago, at Sommer Draw, another Indian (lovely lady, don’t remember her
                  name)
                  complimented me on my sari, to which I replied that it was just for the
                  warm
                  weather. “Yes,” she replied, “That’s how it usually begins.” Well, bravo,
                  well
                  spotted. I was asked by someone at Birka this year why I “always wore
                  sarees”
                  if my persona was English? And I’ve been, ahem, strongly encouraged by my
                  favorite local peers to do Indian better, if I was going to continue doing
                  it,
                  rather than just wearing a sari and slapping on a stick-on bindi.

                  Naturally, I’m inspired to come at the subject via the textiles, and though
                  I’m
                  keenly aware that “traditional” is not the same as “period,” at least it’s
                  a
                  place to start. It’s also become quite obvious that this is more than a
                  mere
                  garb dalliance, and so I am building a basic alternate persona, perhaps for
                  all
                  warm weather—Indian Summer?—or maybe just whenever the mood strikes. Still
                  need
                  to read some history of the area, but have settled on a few things.
                  Location:
                  Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu (hi, Vairavi!). Occupation: spinner. Hindu. I’m
                  lacking a name. I know that researching almost anything Indian is an
                  exercise
                  in endurance given the religious, political, geographical, tribal,
                  language, and
                  caste issues, to name a few. I had a fantasy that I could construct a name
                  that
                  is at least a nod toward my primary name, but I imagine that that’s
                  extremely
                  ambitious. I don’t want to just take something straight from someone
                  else’s
                  research without doing any on my own, but neither do I want to reinvent the
                  proverbial wheel.

                  Another area of interest is food…Indian food is such an amalgamation of
                  formerly-foreign foodstuffs again, it’s hard to know where to begin. No
                  peppers, or other nightshades. One wonders about beans, of course, too.
                  It’s
                  all just mind-boggling, but I continue to be fixated on the idea of doing
                  an
                  Indian-inspired dayboard in the next year.

                  I’m mostly just looking for pointers in the right direction—any books that
                  are
                  must-reads, or stay-away-froms. I have the book “Indian Textiles” ordered.

                  Others I’ll pick up when I can, and comb what bibliographies I find for
                  clues as
                  to where the heck to go from here.

                  And one further question: will there be any sort of meet-and-greet at
                  Pennsic?

                  Namaste,
                  Henna

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                • lalitadasa@gmail.com
                  For my tilak/bindi I use kumkum powder which can be found in most indian grocery stores along with the puja stuff. Lalitadasa ... Date: Thursday, May 06, 2010
                  Message 8 of 16 , May 6, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    For my tilak/bindi I use kumkum powder which can be found in most indian grocery stores along with the puja stuff.

                    Lalitadasa
                    -----Original Message-----
                    Date: Thursday, May 06, 2010 11:54:38 pm
                    To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                    From: "Laura Lawrence" <laura.lillith@...>
                    Subject: Re: [SCA_India] an intro.... to bindis

                    I'm a n00b myself... but I was planning on using a lip-liner pencil to draw
                    it on, since that's the closest thing I can easily find that gives the right
                    kind of look (and isn't made of mercury).

                    Lilavati

                    On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 8:25 AM, Lisa Emery <zizilia85@...> wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    > I don't really like the way stick on bindis look, so I'm curious, what
                    > would you recommend to use for bindis?
                    >
                    > --- On *Thu, 5/6/10, lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...>* wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > From: lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...>
                    > Subject: RE: [SCA_India] an intro
                    > To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Thursday, May 6, 2010, 4:23 PM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Welcome Henna!
                    >
                    > For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food
                    > by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and if I
                    > remember right pepper is period (at least i am sure its mentioned in the
                    > Kamasutra which is a 4th century text).
                    >
                    > As for stick on bindis.... Please avoid.... To me these ar
                  • Andi Houston
                    Henna, Welcome!! I second the Historical Companion to Indian Food by KT Achaya, it s excellent in a rambling anecdote sort of way and the bibliography is to
                    Message 9 of 16 , May 7, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Henna,

                      Welcome!!

                      I second the Historical Companion to Indian Food by KT Achaya, it's excellent in a rambling anecdote sort of way and the bibliography is to die for. I'm cooking a feast this September in Trimaris out of the Nimatnama, a 15th century central Indian manuscript. One of my areas of interest is also Indian cooking so if you're interested in delving further I'd be happy to share my book list.

                      I don't know if you've been to the list's photo archive yet, but there are lots of photos of list members there showing off their garb. India.generalism.net.

                      I personally have given up on wearing anything on my forehead. Without fail I smear it across my forehead within the hour no matter what. It's definitely not a requirement, not all Hindus wore them all the time.

                      Madhavi
                    • countessinn@verizon.net
                      Thank you all for such a warm welcome. Yes, I ve delved into pics and files. I am interested in the food, both in period and mundanely (and wear a sari most
                      Message 10 of 16 , May 7, 2010
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Thank you all for such a warm welcome. Yes, I've delved into pics and
                        files. I
                        am interested in the food, both in period and mundanely (and wear a sari
                        most
                        weekends, event or not), so I'd be thrilled with anything you'd like to
                        share.
                        I feel nekkid without anything on my forehead. I can't get to an
                        asian/indian
                        market just now, so have settled on kumkum-like stickons that I got at
                        Pennsic
                        last year, mostly. My now-ex refers to them as "bullet holes." Such a
                        nice
                        guy.

                        I will be at Pennsic the whole two weeks and am co-teaching a knitting
                        class,
                        but I'm most excited to be participating in Artisans' Row (middle Sunday, I
                        think) processing and spinning cotton on an Indian charkha. I hope to have
                        a
                        less modern one by then, but in any case I'll be all Indian'-ed up, so stop
                        by
                        and say hi!

                        Henna, who incidentally chose that name as a sideways reference to the fact
                        that
                        I DID henna, and *that* was partly responsible for getting me into the SCA,
                        so
                        at this point it's full circle

                        From: Andi Houston jimandandi@...
                        Date: Fri, 07 May 2010 15:50:41 +0000
                        To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [SCA_India] Re: an intro.... to bindis


                        Henna,

                        Welcome!!

                        I second the Historical Companion to Indian Food by KT Achaya, it's
                        excellent in
                        a rambling anecdote sort of way and the bibliography is to die for. I'm
                        cooking
                        a feast this September in Trimaris out of the Nimatnama, a 15th century
                        central
                        Indian manuscript. One of my areas of interest is also Indian cooking so if
                        you're interested in delving further I'd be happy to share my book list.

                        I don't know if you've been to the list's photo archive yet, but there are
                        lots
                        of photos of list members there showing off their garb.
                        India.generalism.net.

                        I personally have given up on wearing anything on my forehead. Without fail
                        I
                        smear it across my forehead within the hour no matter what. It's definitely
                        not
                        a requirement, not all Hindus wore them all the time.

                        Madhavi





                        ------------------------------------

                        SCA_India Mailing List Info:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA_India
                        or
                        List owner: SCA_India-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links




                        --------------------------------------------------------------------
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                        http://link.mail2web.com/LIVE
                      • Elewyiss the Jew
                        Henna, Any posibility of you getting pictures or even better vid of your spinning? How does Indian spinning differ from European? I don t spin myself but I
                        Message 11 of 16 , May 7, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Henna,
                           
                          Any posibility of you getting pictures or even better vid of your spinning? How does Indian spinning differ from European? I don't spin myself but I embroider and have several wonderful weaving friends.
                           
                          Tevi.
                          On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 2:23 PM, countessinn@... <countessinn@...> wrote:
                           

                          Thank you all for such a warm welcome. Yes, I've delved into pics and
                          files. I
                          am interested in the food, both in period and mundanely (and wear a sari
                          most
                          weekends, event or not), so I'd be thrilled with anything you'd like to
                          share.
                          I feel nekkid without anything on my forehead. I can't get to an
                          asian/indian
                          market just now, so have settled on kumkum-like stickons that I got at
                          Pennsic
                          last year, mostly. My now-ex refers to them as "bullet holes." Such a
                          nice
                          guy.

                          I will be at Pennsic the whole two weeks and am co-teaching a knitting
                          class,
                          but I'm most excited to be participating in Artisans' Row (middle Sunday, I
                          think) processing and spinning cotton on an Indian charkha. I hope to have
                          a
                          less modern one by then, but in any case I'll be all Indian'-ed up, so stop
                          by
                          and say hi!

                          Henna, who incidentally chose that name as a sideways reference to the fact
                          that
                          I DID henna, and *that* was partly responsible for getting me into the SCA,
                          so
                          at this point it's full circle

                          From: Andi Houston jimandandi@...
                          Date: Fri, 07 May 2010 15:50:41 +0000
                          To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [SCA_India] Re: an intro.... to bindis



                          Henna,

                          Welcome!!

                          I second the Historical Companion to Indian Food by KT Achaya, it's
                          excellent in
                          a rambling anecdote sort of way and the bibliography is to die for. I'm
                          cooking
                          a feast this September in Trimaris out of the Nimatnama, a 15th century
                          central
                          Indian manuscript. One of my areas of interest is also Indian cooking so if
                          you're interested in delving further I'd be happy to share my book list.

                          I don't know if you've been to the list's photo archive yet, but there are
                          lots
                          of photos of list members there showing off their garb.
                          India.generalism.net.

                          I personally have given up on wearing anything on my forehead. Without fail
                          I
                          smear it across my forehead within the hour no matter what. It's definitely
                          not
                          a requirement, not all Hindus wore them all the time.

                          Madhavi

                          ------------------------------------


                          SCA_India Mailing List Info:
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA_India
                          or
                          List owner: SCA_India-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links

                          ----------------------------------------------------------
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                          http://link.mail2web.com/LIVE




                          --
                          Ro'ah Chatulim
                        • Robin
                          It is said that the driven spindle wheel was invented in India though derived from Chinese silk reeling wheels. European
                          Message 12 of 16 , May 7, 2010
                          • 0 Attachment

                            It is said <mumble mumble, need to research> that the driven spindle wheel was invented in India though derived from Chinese silk reeling wheels.  European great wheels (though not called that at the time) work in exactly the same way.

                             

                            Here some images from Sari safari (I won’t have any fish jaws for cotton processing at Pennsic, though):

                            http://www.sarisafari.com/tour/ponduru.html

                             

                            J  Cotton is a very short fiber, sometimes ¼” and doesn’t have any natural crimp so it takes a lot of twist to make a stable yarn, and it should be spun quite fine.  It can be done on flyer wheels, but (I think) is best done with either a supported spindle (as opposed to it hanging free, like someone spindling wool) or with a driven-spindle wheel.  I currently have a folding charkha (by the marvelous Journeywheel folks), designed at the behest of Gandhi so that Indians could take their spinning anywhere.  He spun on a nearly identical one to mine when he was in prison.  I hope to have a more traditional one by Pennsic, but life happens sometimes.

                             

                            Sadly, I don’t have a camera, though I’ll be in the company of those who do at our Pennsic planning meeting tomorrow…perhaps I’ll co-opt someone for pics.  I have a vast fantasy of spinning and weaving a major piece of garb from all the major fiber types (cotton, linen, wool, and maybe silk).  A sari would require a wider loom than I currently own, so the cotton piece might be downgraded to a dupatta.  J  Or it could wait until I upgrade looms, but that might be a while.

                             

                            Namaste,

                            Henna

                             

                            From: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_India@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Elewyiss the Jew
                            Sent: Friday, May 07, 2010 5:22 PM
                            To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [SCA_India] Re: an intro.... to bindis

                             




                            Henna,

                             

                            Any posibility of you getting pictures or even better vid of your spinning? How does Indian spinning differ from European? I don't spin myself but I embroider and have several wonderful weaving friends.

                             

                            Tevi.

                            On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 2:23 PM, countessinn@... <countessinn@...> wrote:

                             

                            Thank you all for such a warm welcome. Yes, I've delved into pics and
                            files. I
                            am interested in the food, both in period and mundanely (and wear a sari
                            most
                            weekends, event or not), so I'd be thrilled with anything you'd like to
                            share.
                            I feel nekkid without anything on my forehead. I can't get to an
                            asian/indian
                            market just now, so have settled on kumkum-like stickons that I got at
                            Pennsic
                            last year, mostly. My now-ex refers to them as "bullet holes." Such a
                            nice
                            guy.

                            I will be at Pennsic the whole two weeks and am co-teaching a knitting
                            class,
                            but I'm most excited to be participating in Artisans' Row (middle Sunday, I
                            think) processing and spinning cotton on an Indian charkha. I hope to have
                            a
                            less modern one by then, but in any case I'll be all Indian'-ed up, so stop
                            by
                            and say hi!

                            Henna, who incidentally chose that name as a sideways reference to the fact
                            that
                            I DID henna, and *that* was partly responsible for getting me into the SCA,
                            so
                            at this point it's full circle

                            From: Andi Houston jimandandi@...
                            Date: Fri, 07 May 2010 15:50:41 +0000
                            To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [SCA_India] Re: an intro.... to bindis



                            Henna,

                            Welcome!!

                            I second the Historical Companion to Indian Food by KT Achaya, it's
                            excellent in
                            a rambling anecdote sort of way and the bibliography is to die for. I'm
                            cooking
                            a feast this September in Trimaris out of the Nimatnama, a 15th century
                            central
                            Indian manuscript. One of my areas of interest is also Indian cooking so if
                            you're interested in delving further I'd be happy to share my book list.

                            I don't know if you've been to the list's photo archive yet, but there are
                            lots
                            of photos of list members there showing off their garb.
                            India.generalism.net.

                            I personally have given up on wearing anything on my forehead. Without fail
                            I
                            smear it across my forehead within the hour no matter what. It's definitely
                            not
                            a requirement, not all Hindus wore them all the time.

                            Madhavi

                            ------------------------------------



                            SCA_India Mailing List Info:
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA_India
                            or

                            List owner: SCA_India-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links

                            ----------------------------------------------------------
                            mail2web LIVE – Free email based on Microsoft® Exchange technology -
                            http://link.mail2web.com/LIVE




                            --
                            Ro'ah Chatulim



                          • Elewyiss the Jew
                            Wow! A whole garment. Those fish jaws are intimidating. I ve never really heard of cotton spinning. Of course I don t spin well but I do admire those who do.
                            Message 13 of 16 , May 9, 2010
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Wow! A whole garment. Those fish jaws are intimidating. I've never really heard of cotton spinning. Of course I don't spin well but I do admire those who do. Please keep us informed of how your spinning is going. 

                              Tevi

                              On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 6:50 PM, Robin <countessinn@...> wrote:
                               

                              It is said <mumble mumble, need to research> that the driven spindle wheel was invented in India though derived from Chinese silk reeling wheels.  European great wheels (though not called that at the time) work in exactly the same way.

                               

                              Here some images from Sari safari (I won’t have any fish jaws for cotton processing at Pennsic, though):

                              http://www.sarisafari.com/tour/ponduru.html

                               

                              J  Cotton is a very short fiber, sometimes ¼” and doesn’t have any natural crimp so it takes a lot of twist to make a stable yarn, and it should be spun quite fine.  It can be done on flyer wheels, but (I think) is best done with either a supported spindle (as opposed to it hanging free, like someone spindling wool) or with a driven-spindle wheel.  I currently have a folding charkha (by the marvelous Journeywheel folks), designed at the behest of Gandhi so that Indians could take their spinning anywhere.  He spun on a nearly identical one to mine when he was in prison.  I hope to have a more traditional one by Pennsic, but life happens sometimes.

                               

                              Sadly, I don’t have a camera, though I’ll be in the company of those who do at our Pennsic planning meeting tomorrow…perhaps I’ll co-opt someone for pics.  I have a vast fantasy of spinning and weaving a major piece of garb from all the major fiber types (cotton, linen, wool, and maybe silk).  A sari would require a wider loom than I currently own, so the cotton piece might be downgraded to a dupatta.  J  Or it could wait until I upgrade looms, but that might be a while.

                               

                              Namaste,

                              Henna

                               

                              From: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_India@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Elewyiss the Jew
                              Sent: Friday, May 07, 2010 5:22 PM

                              Subject: Re: [SCA_India] Re: an intro.... to bindis

                               




                              Henna,

                               

                              Any posibility of you getting pictures or even better vid of your spinning? How does Indian spinning differ from European? I don't spin myself but I embroider and have several wonderful weaving friends.

                               

                              Tevi.

                              On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 2:23 PM, countessinn@... <countessinn@...> wrote:

                               

                              Thank you all for such a warm welcome. Yes, I've delved into pics and
                              files. I
                              am interested in the food, both in period and mundanely (and wear a sari
                              most
                              weekends, event or not), so I'd be thrilled with anything you'd like to
                              share.
                              I feel nekkid without anything on my forehead. I can't get to an
                              asian/indian
                              market just now, so have settled on kumkum-like stickons that I got at
                              Pennsic
                              last year, mostly. My now-ex refers to them as "bullet holes." Such a
                              nice
                              guy.

                              I will be at Pennsic the whole two weeks and am co-teaching a knitting
                              class,
                              but I'm most excited to be participating in Artisans' Row (middle Sunday, I
                              think) processing and spinning cotton on an Indian charkha. I hope to have
                              a
                              less modern one by then, but in any case I'll be all Indian'-ed up, so stop
                              by
                              and say hi!

                              Henna, who incidentally chose that name as a sideways reference to the fact
                              that
                              I DID henna, and *that* was partly responsible for getting me into the SCA,
                              so
                              at this point it's full circle

                              From: Andi Houston jimandandi@...
                              Date: Fri, 07 May 2010 15:50:41 +0000
                              To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [SCA_India] Re: an intro.... to bindis



                              Henna,

                              Welcome!!

                              I second the Historical Companion to Indian Food by KT Achaya, it's
                              excellent in
                              a rambling anecdote sort of way and the bibliography is to die for. I'm
                              cooking
                              a feast this September in Trimaris out of the Nimatnama, a 15th century
                              central
                              Indian manuscript. One of my areas of interest is also Indian cooking so if
                              you're interested in delving further I'd be happy to share my book list.

                              I don't know if you've been to the list's photo archive yet, but there are
                              lots
                              of photos of list members there showing off their garb.
                              India.generalism.net.

                              I personally have given up on wearing anything on my forehead. Without fail
                              I
                              smear it across my forehead within the hour no matter what. It's definitely
                              not
                              a requirement, not all Hindus wore them all the time.

                              Madhavi

                              ------------------------------------



                              SCA_India Mailing List Info:
                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA_India
                              or

                              List owner: SCA_India-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links

                              ----------------------------------------------------------
                              mail2web LIVE – Free email based on Microsoft® Exchange technology -
                              http://link.mail2web.com/LIVE




                              --
                              Ro'ah Chatulim






                              --
                              Ro'ah Chatulim
                            • bethlakshmibetty
                              Hi gang! If I had a dollar for every time someone helpfully offered me a stick on bindi! :) I wouldn t be rich, but I d have enough for more than a few
                              Message 14 of 16 , May 11, 2010
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hi gang!

                                If I had a dollar for every time someone helpfully offered me a stick on bindi! :) I wouldn't be rich, but I'd have enough for more than a few samosas!

                                I'm always in a dilemma when someone offers. I don't want to be rude, and rant about how stick-on bindis are not a historic thing... but then I don't want to say a polite "no thanks" and skip a chance to offer a little insight.

                                I do what Lalithadasa does - if I wear a bindi (a real toss up), I do the following:
                                - powder the area
                                - red lip gloss
                                - kumkum powder (red powder)

                                the underlying substructure of gloss + powder is totally unperiod, but it's in the effort to create a period look. What we know for sure is that the historic bindi would be either a powder or a paste.

                                I go with the gloss and powder because I'm active and sweaty and subject to easily brushing it off or smearing it - the powder/gloss combo does a lot for durably and sweatproofness.


                                Of interest -- one of my many Indian hostesses did a painted on bindi everyday. I just got a package of what she uses, and I'll be trying to make a paste I can paint... I'll keep ya'll in the loop. I couldn't help but notice that she ended up with a non-granular paste/paint sort of thing that was definitely dry to the touch and seemed to stay in place wonderfully well.

                                Of course it didn't hurt that my hostess had a wonderful Keralan skin type - dark skin and less prone to obscene amounts of sweat... so she wasn't subjecting her bindhi to the adverse conditions I do...

                                It's also interesting that in different eras of painting, you'll see very different looks and colors to the forehead markings. Some of them ar religious (the white half moons, for example, are Shiva), some of them are just ornament. Before worrying a lot about the bindhi, it's worth checking relevant paintings to see if they were even popular in the era you're going for...


                                Lakshmi




                                --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, "lalitadasa@..." <LalitaDasa@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > For my tilak/bindi I use kumkum powder which can be found in most indian grocery stores along with the puja stuff.
                                >
                                > Lalitadasa
                                > -----Original Message-----
                                > Date: Thursday, May 06, 2010 11:54:38 pm
                                > To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                                > From: "Laura Lawrence" <laura.lillith@...>
                                > Subject: Re: [SCA_India] an intro.... to bindis
                                >
                                > I'm a n00b myself... but I was planning on using a lip-liner pencil to draw
                                > it on, since that's the closest thing I can easily find that gives the right
                                > kind of look (and isn't made of mercury).
                                >
                                > Lilavati
                                >
                                > On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 8:25 AM, Lisa Emery <zizilia85@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > I don't really like the way stick on bindis look, so I'm curious, what
                                > > would you recommend to use for bindis?
                                > >
                                > > --- On *Thu, 5/6/10, lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...>* wrote:
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > From: lalitadasa@... <LalitaDasa@...>
                                > > Subject: RE: [SCA_India] an intro
                                > > To: SCA_India@yahoogroups.com
                                > > Date: Thursday, May 6, 2010, 4:23 PM
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Welcome Henna!
                                > >
                                > > For indian food research i suggest starting with The History of Indian Food
                                > > by Achaya. Its a great intro into what was available in period, and if I
                                > > remember right pepper is period (at least i am sure its mentioned in the
                                > > Kamasutra which is a 4th century text).
                                > >
                                > > As for stick on bindis.... Please avoid.... To me these ar
                                >
                              • JL Badgley
                                ... Forgive my potential ignorance, but didn t the bindi also signify different castes as well, depending on period and location? -Ii
                                Message 15 of 16 , May 11, 2010
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  On Wed, May 12, 2010 at 1:47 AM, bethlakshmibetty <bethlakshmi@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > It's also interesting that in different eras of painting, you'll see very different looks and colors to the forehead markings. Some of them ar religious (the white half moons, for example, are Shiva), some of them are just ornament. Before worrying a lot about the bindhi, it's worth checking relevant paintings to see if they were even popular in the era you're going for...
                                  >

                                  Forgive my potential ignorance, but didn't the bindi also signify
                                  different castes as well, depending on period and location?

                                  -Ii
                                • bethlakshmibetty
                                  That s a new one for me. Never say never, but my understanding is that, when we take all of forehead markings in general: - some mark what deity you worship -
                                  Message 16 of 16 , May 12, 2010
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    That's a new one for me.

                                    Never say never, but my understanding is that, when we take all of forehead markings in general:
                                    - some mark what deity you worship - Vishnu has a marking, Shiva has a marking, I'd bet other dieties do, too.

                                    - the fact that you put it on that day may be you are an observant person who has performed your prayers - depends on the sect we're talking about.

                                    - some mark that you are a married vs. unmarried woman and not a widow. At least in a modern, traditional sense.

                                    - some have *seemed* unique to a given time/place - there a 7 dot pattern and a dot in a circle pattern in 13th/14th century Buddhist paintings that I just never see at any other time.

                                    I haven't heard that any of them specifically relating to *caste*. But I'd love more info, since there's an exception to just about every rule.

                                    One thing I find really hard to trace is any particular rule about this. I found some sex treatises that mention stuff on the forehead as part of the magic spell for getting a desired outcome. But I haven't found anything about the rules of daily use.

                                    -Lakshmi



                                    --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, JL Badgley <tatsushu@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > On Wed, May 12, 2010 at 1:47 AM, bethlakshmibetty <bethlakshmi@...> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > It's also interesting that in different eras of painting, you'll see very different looks and colors to the forehead markings. Some of them ar religious (the white half moons, for example, are Shiva), some of them are just ornament. Before worrying a lot about the bindhi, it's worth checking relevant paintings to see if they were even popular in the era you're going for...
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    > Forgive my potential ignorance, but didn't the bindi also signify
                                    > different castes as well, depending on period and location?
                                    >
                                    > -Ii
                                    >
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