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Re: [SCA_India] Beverage help wanted

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  • Holly Simon
    1. Soak the almonds and pistachios in water for 4-5 hours. 2. Peel off the almonds skins. I wonder if you could just soak blanched almonds??? Would be easier
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 2, 2006
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      1. Soak the almonds and pistachios in water for 4-5 hours.
      2. Peel off the almonds skins.
      I wonder if you could just soak blanched almonds???  Would be easier than trying to peel the skins....
      Also, is that 1 caramom pod crushed??  And 2 glasses of milk, is that 2 cups??  This sounds absolutely wonderful!!!!
       
      Bhrngari
    • Marcus Findlay-Arthur
      Don t bother if you re using the ground almonds or the already blanched almonds. The soaking is to soften the nut to make the crushing a little easier
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 3, 2006
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        Don't bother if you're using the ground almonds or the already blanched almonds. The soaking is to soften the nut to make the crushing a little easier apparently and help remove the skins. Using the ground almonds may not be as flavourful as using "fresh" almonds that you grind yourself. On the grinding as an aside -- if doing at home with every convenience to hand I'd simply whiz in the blender. Measurements are a bit variable I find in these sort of verbal recipes. I'd work on an 8oz fluid measure per "cup/glass" and niggle the recipe from there. Mr.Singh referred to the cardamom flavouring as "powdered" in the UK that means ground. So yes if you were making it up in a period kitchen you'd grind that spice in a mortar as well, until very fine and powdery.

        Medically/nutritionally I incorporate almond milk into my diet almost daily and make the stuff up several times a week -- you're supposed to remove the skins here too but I never bother. The difference is that the final product isn't as "white" as goat or cow's milk would be. In Indian cuisine where great attention is given to the preparation of the foodstuffs, it's probably a safe bet that going the extra mile would be part of the kitchen ritual -- any opinions? Curious.

        On the cardamom -- you want the interior contents of the seed and not the outer shell. Thats rather unpleasant and woody.

        Mangal.



        On 11/3/06, Holly Simon <hollya@...> wrote:

        1. Soak the almonds and pistachios in water for 4-5 hours.
        2. Peel off the almonds skins.
        I wonder if you could just soak blanched almonds???  Would be easier than trying to peel the skins....
        Also, is that 1 caramom pod crushed??  And 2 glasses of milk, is that 2 cups??  This sounds absolutely wonderful!!!!
         
        Bhrngari


      • bethlakshmi
        ... Wow! Does that ever sound tasty! If it isn t documentably period, but more probably period , it ll still do for stuff like camping events, where my gang
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 3, 2006
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          --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, "Marcus Findlay-Arthur"
          <mangal.sews@...> wrote:
          > Indian Almond Milk -- Badam Milk
          >
          > Ingredients
          >
          > 20 almonds
          > 20 Pistachios
          > 2 glasses milk
          > 1 cardamom crushed
          > 1 tablespoon sugar
          > 2 drops rose-water
          >

          Wow! Does that ever sound tasty!

          If it isn't documentably period, but more "probably period", it'll
          still do for stuff like camping events, where my gang usually tries
          to avoid any overly OOP ingredients and processes, but doesn't worry
          too, too much about plausible stuff. And it sounds just wondeful on
          a cold Pennsic night or morning!

          Thanks!

          -Lakshmi
        • Marcus Findlay-Arthur
          As promised I stopped off at the Guruwara last night to see Mr. Singh. Here is the second hot milk beverage recipe. The chai version sounds all round bleh
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 4, 2006
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            As promised I stopped off at the Guruwara last night to see Mr. Singh. Here is the second hot milk beverage recipe. The "chai" version sounds all round bleh even tossing out the tea -- so get back to me. (Mrs. Singh has got involved too -- and armed with several dessert recipes was sent on my way. I had a quick scan of her various recipes and they amount to the standard carrot halwa and semolina puddings which are porridge-like in their simplest and less "stiff" form. What I did find interesting was a savoury toasted wheat "cereal" served as a breakfast. Mrs. Singh was quick to go into the saga of her Grandmother's mother's grandmother's recipe which I "dated" circa the early 1800's).

            Yes I thought the previous recipe quite promising. Although to be frank if I was entertaining at home and the almond flavouring was a bit lacking I'd have no scruples doctoring with essence. Hhhmmm well perhaps not as I can not consume it anymore. This one just rings my bells since it's got almost all my favourite seeds, flavourings and nuts in it. Promises to be rich due to the sesame oils and tasty.

            In passing -- has anyone on the list done any research into Ayurvedic treatments and historic background? Didn't early editions/translations of the Karma Sutra feature a small section on this sort of stuff? Along the lines of an Indian Mrs. Beeton's?

            Hot Milk with Cardamom (Elaichi wala Doodh)

            Ingredients

            3 Tbsp. White Poppy seeds. Also known as Khaskhas
            20 Blanched Almonds
            3 cups Whole Milk
            4 Cardamoms (Hari Elaichi)
            Sugar (to taste)
            Half cup Water

            Method

            1. In a small frying pan dry roast the poppy seeds on a low heat. Do not allow them to burn.

            2. Crush the roasted poppy seeds and almonds in a mortar until you obtain a very fine paste (adding a little water as needed).

            3. Add this paste to 2 cups of milk in a saucepan on the stove over a gentle heat. (If the poppy seeds and nutmeats are too coarse you could either blend them into the warm milk with a blender or strain them thru' muslin from the warmed milk).  I'd just make a muslin bouquet garni bag and dump the nutmeats, seeds etc into that and let the flavourings seethe in the milk from start to finish. Add the rest of the milk.

            6. Crush the cardamoms and add to the milk.

            7. Raise the heat and bring to a boil on a medium heat, stir it well as it may stick to the pan.

            8. Once it has boiled reduce the heat again and simmer on low heat for a few minutes. Watch your pot so it does not boil over!

            9. Serve hot with sugar if desired. (Strain to remove the cardamom seeds/Remove your bouquet garni bag).

            Courtesy Mr. Kuldip Singh – Birmingham Gurudwara, Smethwick.

            Mangal.


          • Shana McCoy
            The Kamasutra certainly has many interesting recipes in it for everything from facial creams to magic love potions. A lot of the beauty recipes are similar to
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 5, 2006
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              The Kamasutra certainly has many interesting recipes in it for
              everything from facial creams to magic love potions. A lot of the
              beauty recipes are similar to what I've read of Ayervedic tonics and
              such. I do find that this information is not reliably translated in
              most modern copies. A lot of indigenous plants are being left out or
              replaced by plants common to westerners.
              ---Vasantasena (formerly Mungala)
            • Marcus Findlay-Arthur
              Interesting. Haven t bothered/seen a copy since I located a Victorian issue in the early 70 s which I now no longer have access to -- long long before the SCA.
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 6, 2006
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                Interesting. Haven't bothered/seen a copy since I located a Victorian issue in the early 70's which I now no longer have access to -- long long before the SCA. Curious about the adaptations taking place.

                Mangal.

                On 11/6/06, Shana McCoy <LadyMungala@...> wrote:

                The Kamasutra certainly has many interesting recipes in it for
                everything from facial creams to magic love potions. A lot of the
                beauty recipes are similar to what I've read of Ayervedic tonics and
                such. I do find that this information is not reliably translated in
                most modern copies. A lot of indigenous plants are being left out or
                replaced by plants common to westerners.
                ---Vasantasena (formerly Mungala)


              • Shana McCoy
                I don t know if adaptations is quite the right word. Then again, maybe it is..... The Burton translation has been bastardized even further by just about every
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 7, 2006
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                  I don't know if adaptations is quite the right word. Then again, maybe
                  it is..... The Burton translation has been bastardized even further by
                  just about every publishing house imaginable. Ninety percent of every
                  kamasutra book on the market is nothing but crap in a shiny cover. My
                  favorite translation came out in 2002, Wendy Doniger and Sudhir Kakar
                  retranslated the text, paring off all the unnecessary commentary and
                  restoring it to its simplest form. My second favorite translation is
                  the Alain Danilou one. Its huge and very informative. But there are
                  topics in it that aren't found in any other translation so this makes
                  me a little nervious. I really wish I was a sanskrit scholar so I
                  could do my own research and find out if he's just creating chapters
                  out of whole cloth or if everyone else is simply too squweemish to
                  tackle certain topics..... Oh well, this is one of my all time
                  favorite ranting topics so I'll shut up now.
                  ---Vasantasena

                  On 11/6/06, Marcus Findlay-Arthur <mangal.sews@...> wrote:
                  > Interesting. Haven't bothered/seen a copy since I located a Victorian issue
                  > in the early 70's which I now no longer have access to -- long long before
                  > the SCA. Curious about the adaptations taking place.
                  >
                  > Mangal.
                  >
                  > On 11/6/06, Shana McCoy <LadyMungala@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > The Kamasutra certainly has many interesting recipes in it for
                  > > everything from facial creams to magic love potions. A lot of the
                  > > beauty recipes are similar to what I've read of Ayervedic tonics and
                  > > such. I do find that this information is not reliably translated in
                  > > most modern copies. A lot of indigenous plants are being left out or
                  > > replaced by plants common to westerners.
                  > > ---Vasantasena (formerly Mungala)
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                • bethlakshmi
                  ... every ... Here here! I have a few that I consider entertaining light porn and pretty pictures, but not really research. They are great for a little
                  Message 8 of 16 , Nov 8, 2006
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                    --- In SCA_India@yahoogroups.com, "Shana McCoy" <LadyMungala@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > just about every publishing house imaginable. Ninety percent of
                    every
                    > kamasutra book on the market is nothing but crap in a shiny cover.

                    Here here! I have a few that I consider entertaining light porn and
                    pretty pictures, but not really research. They are great for a
                    little umm... inspiration... but not so much for Lakshmi Research. :)

                    > My
                    > favorite translation came out in 2002, Wendy Doniger and Sudhir
                    Kakar
                    > retranslated the text, paring off all the unnecessary commentary and
                    > restoring it to its simplest form.

                    Huh. It's good to hear a positive review of that one. I don't have
                    it yet, but I got Wendy Doniger's audio book on the same topic:

                    http://www.amazon.com/Erotic-Spirituality-Kamasutra-Wendy-
                    Doniger/dp/1591790956

                    Which I got at a local book warehouse for WAY cheaper than that -
                    more like $20 than $60! It was interesting, although a little dry.
                    Wendy Doniger sure knows her Sanskrit stuff, since she was pretty
                    clearly extemporizing some of her commentary using her knowledge of
                    Sanskrit grammer and roots. But sometimes I didn't totally agree
                    with her interpretations of various facts. She seemed to have a
                    tendancy to explain away stuff she didn't personally like. It's been
                    a while, and I can't come up with a ready example, unfortunately.

                    I'm glad to hear her translation is less biased than that.

                    > My second favorite translation is
                    > the Alain Danilou one. Its huge and very informative. But there are
                    > topics in it that aren't found in any other translation so this
                    makes
                    > me a little nervious. I really wish I was a sanskrit scholar so I
                    > could do my own research and find out if he's just creating chapters
                    > out of whole cloth or if everyone else is simply too squweemish to
                    > tackle certain topics..... Oh well, this is one of my all time
                    > favorite ranting topics so I'll shut up now.

                    I doubt it. Of course, I'm biased. This happens to be *my* favorite
                    translation. :)

                    But I've read a couple other works by Danilou and found him to be a
                    fairly dedicated and thorough scholar. He's also the least prudish
                    Hindu eroticism translator/researcher I've come across. Now maybe
                    his very lack of prudishness means that his spin on things is baised
                    a bit in the opposite direction of Doniger... His "The Hindu Temple:
                    Deification of Eroticism" puts a very, very different spin on erotic
                    love and ancient/medeival Hinduism. I suspect some more traditional
                    Hindu spirituality scholars have had corallaries over it.

                    -Lakshmi
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