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Re: [SCA_BARDS] Re: Roving Bardic competition at GWW question

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  • Mark Cipra
    Hey Mallye: Note that you re replying to SCA_BARDS, not a more local list. So the Bardic Madness she refers to is Midrealm Bardic Madness, November 21
    Message 1 of 26 , Oct 7, 2009
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      Hey Mallye:  Note that you're replying to SCA_BARDS, not a more local list.  So the Bardic Madness she refers to is Midrealm Bardic Madness, November 21 (http://tilted-windmill.com/bms11/); "Roundhouse" is also a Midrealm event that takes place around midsummer.

      Good advice, though, and thanks for the opportunity to plug Bardic Madness :)

       
      Llywelyn
      Mark Cipra
      __
      "When in doubt, end with a jig" - Robin McCauley



      From: Mallye <mallye13@...>
      To: "SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com" <SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2009 10:25:39 AM
      Subject: Re: [SCA_BARDS] Re: Roving Bardic competition at GWW question

       

      I still love that story. We eavesdropped. It at Bardic Roumdhouse, and
      we wanted to talk to you about ren faire busking. We haven't... yet.

      I'd like to offer a suggestion, as well. I've performed twice now, two
      or three songs at Roundhouse, and a competition in my barony. The
      first time I didn't know what I was going to sing. The second time I
      had practiced my new harp piece. My advice is to tell period to shove
      it and perform what you know and love. But that may not be *good*
      advice. I'm still practicing the harp piece, and I hope to share it
      and a new song at Bardic Madness.

      Mallye
      Baronies of Red Spears and Cleftlands

      ---
      If you can walk, then you can dance.
      If you can talk, then you can sing.

      On Oct 7, 2009, at 10:04 AM, corrie <corrie.bergeron@ gmail.com> wrote:

      > Much excellent advice, indeed, and from learned and experienced
      > sources. The name of His Grace Duke Flieg was a legend when I joined
      > three decades ago; I think I met Mathurin at Pennsic X. I've not had
      > the pleasure of meeting Lady Aneleda and Don Jean, but their advice is
      > sage.
      >
      > Competitions can be funny things. From what you've described, the
      > judge is the current titled bard, so that's the person you're trying
      > to impress. Bear in mind that they may be more impressed by your
      > being comfortable in your own skin than than an overt attempt to wow
      > them.
      >
      > Regarding mistakes: If you want to absolutely ensure that your
      > audience notices the error, stop the performance and apologize. If you
      > just drive on as though nothing happened, most folks won't notice.
      > Remember: A wrong note played timidly is a mistake. A wrong note
      > played boldy is an interpretation.
      >
      > Re period stringed instruments: Most descriptions and depictions show
      > them being plucked with a plectrum (pick), most playing single-note
      > melodies. But outside an Arts & Sciences competition, I doubt that
      > any will object to strumming chords, Travis-style fingerpicked
      > arpeggios, or even "fancy stuff" such as hammer-ons and pull-offs.
      > This is the Society for *Creative* Anachronism, after all.
      > (Two-handed tapping and sweep-picking may be over the line, though.)
      >
      > I can't over-stress the value of practice. I memorize most of my
      > pieces, but there's nothing wrong with using a visual aid. (Bear in
      > mind that campfire lighting is seldom adequate.) But even if you read
      > the piece, practice it. I rehearse in the car on the way to and from
      > work. (The fact that I'm travelling also aids memory, as it's a
      > version of Cicero's trick of mentally placing parts of the performance
      > in different locations, then taking a mental stroll and picking up
      > each piece / section / verse in turn.) I also practice in front of
      > the mirror to work on movement, gestures, and facial expression.
      >
      > There can be such as thing as too much practice, though...
      >
      > I used to busk at the Texas Ren Faire. At that sort of gig you have
      > two goals - sell beer and impress the ladies. It's hotcoldwetdusty
      > all at once, which does wonderful things to your vocal chords. So, you
      > play the same eight-song set over and over, all in the People's Key of
      > G. You do a few rousers, some funny-sly-slightly- naughty tunes stuffed
      > with double-entendres, a couple swing-yer-ale- mug drinking songs, and
      > for street cred, one of several Perfectly Period Ballads that go
      > verse-chorus- verse-chorus- verse-chorus until everyone in the song is
      > dead.
      >
      > It was midafternoon on Sunday, well into the Fair season, and I was on
      > autopilot. I'd played these songs gawd-knows how many times in the
      > last few weeks. I was sawing away at one of those Perfectly Period
      > Ballads, and on a mental vacation. I don't know what I was thinking
      > about, but it certainly wasn't the song I was singing. I tuned back
      > in just as I reached the end of the chorus.
      >
      > That's when I realized that I didn't know which verse came next.
      >
      > In fact, I didn't know which song I was singing.
      >
      >
      >
      > Break a leg, and let us know how it goes!
      >
      >
      >
      > THL Brendan O Corraidhe CIM OST OW HH MoSS
      >
      >
      > ------------ --------- --------- ------
      >
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      >
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      >
      >
      >

    • Mathurin Kerbusso
      ... Probably still not an issue. But don t worry about it, either way. If asked, use Flieg s response. :-) Play for the audience. Do your best. All else is
      Message 2 of 26 , Oct 7, 2009
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        Sharon Vasquez wrote:
        > Alas, I forgot to mention that I will be competing. I'm not hoping to
        > win, but I'm hoping to
        > do the best that I'm capable of.
        > Gillian

        Probably still not an issue. But don't worry about it, either way. If
        asked, use Flieg's response. :-)

        Play for the audience. Do your best. All else is naught.


        --
        Mathurin
        "Non nobis solum"
      • leahpagham
        Yes, Frederick of Holland is also Flieg. Possessor of many titles and even more talents. He s probably off to Great Western War at this point, though. Some
        Message 3 of 26 , Oct 7, 2009
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          Yes, Frederick of Holland is also Flieg. Possessor of many titles and even more talents.
          He's probably off to Great Western War at this point, though. Some of us still have to work for two more days....

          Leah

          --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Justinos Tekton called Justin <justin@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Wed, 2009-10-07 at 10:04 -0400, corrie wrote:
          > > The name of His Grace Duke Flieg
          >
          >
          > This is probably a stupid question, but is Duke Flieg the same person as
          > Duke Frederick of Holland? If so, I had the pleasure of meeting you at
          > Pennsic this year, at the blood drive.
          >
          > Justin
          >
          > --
          > ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
          > Maistor Justinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
          > Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two keys
          > fesswise reversed sable.
          >
          > justin@... http://4th.com/sca/justin/
          >
        • Karen
          I mostly lurk, but THIS is a question I can actually answer! I m a classical guitarist of many years study (since 1970, when I was 10 and sick of piano). My
          Message 4 of 26 , Oct 7, 2009
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            I mostly lurk, but THIS is a question I can actually answer! I'm a classical guitarist of many years' study (since 1970, when I was 10 and sick of piano). My favorite period is just after the SCA timeframe (late 1600 to early 1700 Spanish), but I've played a lot of Medieval and Renaissance music over the years, as well. Fingerstyle is period, as is some strumming (called rasgueado in Spanish). Check out music for guitar (or adapted) by Praetorius, Dowland, and Robert Johnson for starters. There's an excellent book, The Renaissance Guitar, by Fred Noad, with good arrangements and notes on playing. I would grade it as intermediate/advanced, though there are some simpler pieces, as well. It's currently out of print, but Amazon usually has some copies kicking around, and some of the music websites like Lark in the Morning or Boulder Early Music Shop may have it.

            Allan Alexander also has some nice books of Medieval and Renaissance guitar arrangements.
            http://www.guitarandlute.com/book-cd.html
            He also has a very helpful book on learning to read lute tabulature for guitar.

            Play on!

            Lady Ceridwen ferch Grufydd
            Barony of Twin Moons, Atenveldt

            Sharon Vasquez wrote:
             
            I'm not sure what the proper manner is.  Is the right way simply to pluck or strum the strings with no elaborate stuff? 
            (I priced lutes.  pricey suckers!)
            Gillian


            From: Frederick J. Hollander <flieg@socrates. berkeley. edu>
            To: SCA_BARDS@yahoogrou ps.com
            Sent: Tue, October 6, 2009 6:12:58 PM
            Subject: Re: [SCA_BARDS] Re: Roving Bardic competition at GWW question

             

            If anyone asks... its persona is a lute... :)

            In competition, there might be questions on the manner in which you play
            it (if you are lucky enough to have a judge who knows something about
            it), but in regular bardic entertainment, never a problem, and often
            useful in engaging the audience.

            -- Flieg.


          • leahpagham
            I agree completely about the Noad book. As to any book by Allen Alexander (with or without Jessica Walsh collaborating) is to beware of the provenance of the
            Message 5 of 26 , Oct 7, 2009
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              I agree completely about the Noad book. As to any book by Allen Alexander (with or without Jessica Walsh collaborating) is to beware of the provenance of the piece in question. They freely intermingle their own compositions in books titled things like Renaissance Music or Ancient Airs with pieces that are legitimately from the time period. Pretty pieces, I grant you, but not what you are expecting based on the title of the book.

              Leah, learning guitar currently

              --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Karen <desertdreameraz@...> wrote:
              >
              > I mostly lurk, but THIS is a question I can actually answer! I'm a
              > classical guitarist of many years' study (since 1970, when I was 10 and
              > sick of piano). My favorite period is just after the SCA timeframe (late
              > 1600 to early 1700 Spanish), but I've played a lot of Medieval and
              > Renaissance music over the years, as well. Fingerstyle is period, as is
              > some strumming (called rasgueado in Spanish). Check out music for guitar
              > (or adapted) by Praetorius, Dowland, and Robert Johnson for starters.
              > There's an excellent book, The Renaissance Guitar, by Fred Noad, with
              > good arrangements and notes on playing. I would grade it as
              > intermediate/advanced, though there are some simpler pieces, as well.
              > It's currently out of print, but Amazon usually has some copies kicking
              > around, and some of the music websites like Lark in the Morning or
              > Boulder Early Music Shop may have it.
              >
              > Allan Alexander also has some nice books of Medieval and Renaissance
              > guitar arrangements.
              > http://www.guitarandlute.com/book-cd.html
              > He also has a very helpful book on learning to read lute tabulature for
              > guitar.
              >
              > Play on!
              >
              > Lady Ceridwen ferch Grufydd
              > Barony of Twin Moons, Atenveldt
              >
              > Sharon Vasquez wrote:
              > >
              > > I'm not sure what the proper manner is. Is the right way simply to
              > > pluck or strum the strings with no elaborate stuff?
              > > (I priced lutes. pricey suckers!)
              > > Gillian
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > > *From:* Frederick J. Hollander <flieg@...>
              > > *To:* SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com
              > > *Sent:* Tue, October 6, 2009 6:12:58 PM
              > > *Subject:* Re: [SCA_BARDS] Re: Roving Bardic competition at GWW question
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > If anyone asks... its persona is a lute... :)
              > >
              > > In competition, there might be questions on the manner in which you play
              > > it (if you are lucky enough to have a judge who knows something about
              > > it), but in regular bardic entertainment, never a problem, and often
              > > useful in engaging the audience.
              > >
              > > -- Flieg.
              > >
              >
            • Karen
              True, and I should have mentioned it. He IS pretty good (albeit brief) in giving sources and indicating what he s written, himself, even variations on original
              Message 6 of 26 , Oct 7, 2009
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                True, and I should have mentioned it. He IS pretty good (albeit brief) in giving sources and indicating what he's written, himself, even variations on original work.

                One more book, slightly out of period, but very rich for documentation on tabulature and near-period playing styles is a new one. It was written by one of my own teacher's teachers at ASU, and I'm alternately having fits and sheer bliss working through it.

                http://www.frankkoonce.com/publications.php?pub=spanish_anthology

                AND, Joy of Joys, I just discovered that he has a new, earlier book available. Woooooo!
                http://www.frankkoonce.com/publications.php?pub=ren_vihuela

                Guess what I'm buying next! LOL

                Ceridwen

                leahpagham wrote:
                 

                I agree completely about the Noad book. As to any book by Allen Alexander (with or without Jessica Walsh collaborating) is to beware of the provenance of the piece in question. They freely intermingle their own compositions in books titled things like Renaissance Music or Ancient Airs with pieces that are legitimately from the time period. Pretty pieces, I grant you, but not what you are expecting based on the title of the book.

                Leah, learning guitar currently

                -




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