Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [SCA_BARDS] Re: new sca bard -vids/music/trad tunes (Childe Ballads)

Expand Messages
  • jenny tavernier
    These are all Childe Ballads - done by Steeleye Span - a rocking trad folk group (60/70s) (and much older! LOL!) you can find the lyrics online, and they are
    Message 1 of 19 , Sep 30, 2008

      These are all Childe Ballads - done by Steeleye Span - a rocking trad folk group (60/70s) (and much older! LOL!)

      you can find the lyrics online, and they are now in cd format
      These are from youtube, and you can find many more if you search the lower right content box.

      These CAN be done very nicely with the solo melody -

      All around my hat
      http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=CqInvZ9hY9Y&feature=related

      Misty Moisty Morning
      http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=heCWKiII29A&feature=related

      Thomas the Rhymer
      http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=D4IMtejYZgE&feature=related

      The Blacksmith
      http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=D4IMtejYZgE&feature=related

      and hears a choral treat!!!!

      Gaudete
      http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=OBZ8v9L8444&feature=related

      Jen! aka
      Rindill, bard of the picklebowl

    • jenny tavernier
      Here is some fine stuff - vids and tunes to hear!!! (childe ballads and the like) from a fine trad/folk band called Steeleye Span - (60s&70s) and still going -
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 1, 2008

        Here is some fine stuff - vids and tunes to hear!!!
        (childe ballads and the like) from a fine trad/folk band called Steeleye Span - (60s&70s) and still going -

        it's all youtube, and one can find the lyrics on the web.  These also make very fine solo pieces, and the documentation would be found (Childe, etc) further back than Steeleye, (LOL!) who resurrected them in fine fashion.  If these suit your fancy,
         check the  (40) related videos mid page on the right - )
        May it spark your listening and singing pleasure!

        Jenneth the Rindill
        bard of the picklebowl

        also look for vids of Fairport convention, another group that sang in the same vein -

      • Lady Aneleda Falconbridge
        Where did Charlemagne put his armies? In his sleevies! based on the text of the first piece in the link below - We re-wrote it to modernize it for easy
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 1, 2008
          Where did Charlemagne put his armies? In his sleevies!
          based on the text of the first piece in the link below - We re-wrote
          it to modernize it for easy reading, and because we felt the
          verse/chorus structure for so many verses seemed a bit *long* we
          grouped the verses into sets of three verses / chorus. And we often
          still cut more out when performing, and have a men only/women only
          (men always sing "And YET you would not love me!")

          So, it the same, but different.

          =)

          Aneleda



          --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Greg Lindahl <lindahl@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Tue, Sep 30, 2008 at 10:41:34PM -0000, Lady Aneleda Falconbridge
          wrote:
          >
          > > I'll put the verses we have (and have cut down) in the files
          section.
          >
          > Well, you could always use the original:
          >
          > http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ballads/handful.html#green
          >
          >
        • Greg Lindahl
          ... Sounds interesting, I ll check it out. -- Gregory
          Message 4 of 19 , Oct 1, 2008
            > So, it the same, but different.

            Sounds interesting, I'll check it out.

            -- Gregory
          • tsivia@uottawa.ca
            Just a quick note on the Steeleye Span songs noted in Jenneth s post on period songs, as Child Ballads and other period non-court music is what I got my
            Message 5 of 19 , Oct 1, 2008
              Just a quick note on the Steeleye Span songs noted in Jenneth's post on
              "period" songs, as Child Ballads and other period non-court music is what
              I got my Laurel in a couple of million years ago...<grin>

              Ultimately sing what is FUN FOR YOU. Get over the fear of standing in
              front of people and singing, and THEN do the research into songs which are
              fun AND period. I used to draw from Steeleye Span (English), Fairport
              Convention (English), Pentangle (English), Silly Wizard (Scots), the
              Corries (Scots) and Gaberlunzie (Ditto). A caveat: nearly NOTHING in
              ENGLISH sung as "Irish folk song" is period. All of THAT was done in
              GAELIC.

              But above all else: HAVE FUN!!!
              TSivia (Ealdormere)


              All around my hat
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqInvZ9hY9Y&feature=related
              I don't know how old this one IS but it isn't a Child (no "E" please: it's
              the proper last name of the fellow who collected the songs) ballad.


              the blacksmith
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WGIo_y7jdI&feature=related
              Collected by Cecil Sharp, and not Francis James Child. Date is unclear to me.


              Lark in the Morning
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGHYl7Kv50g
              Collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams (date unclear to me).


              Cam ye o're from france
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVe-izA-Fj4&feature=related
              A Scots 1745 rebellion song with lots of political references, thinly
              veiled. Definitely NOT period - I learnt it off an old "Corries" record
              <!!> album in the early 1970s. It's a great bouncy song, but not w/in the
              1650ish cut-off for the SCA.


              Choral surprise - Gaudete
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBZ8v9L8444&feature=related
              Piae Cantiones (Finland, 1582);The words derive from the medieval Bohemian
              song Ezechielis Porta, which Finnish clerical students would have
              encountered in Prague and which shared a tune with a Czech vernacular
              Christmas song that still survives. Finno, the editor of Piae Cantiones,
              was probably responsible for the refrain. It adapts the words of one of
              the medieval verses to the music which, in various forms, was sung
              throughout Lutheran Germany to Luther's single-stanza grace before meals,
              Danket dem Herrn.
            • jenny tavernier
              Hey Tsivia! Thank you for refreshing more of my memory - the other Steeleye Span Vids - (like Elf Call, Thomas the Rhymer, Sir James the Rose - etc etc - Oh
              Message 6 of 19 , Oct 2, 2008
                Hey Tsivia! Thank you for refreshing more of my memory -

                the other Steeleye Span Vids - (like Elf Call, Thomas the Rhymer, Sir James the Rose - etc etc - Oh Man!  They have really been adding them - (and not just youtube) since I last checked on them - and it was a great kick in the bardic pleasure arse -

                Jen!!!

                 

              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.