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Re: Querry: so, who is the audience at a royal competition?

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  • wodeford
    ... summoned to observe you, snubbing none, or know that you are robbing people of their time and spurning their gift of attention. Let that serve as your
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 3, 2008
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      --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael B. Greenstein"
      <greenstein@...> wrote:
      > Always and ever, either perform for those whose attention is
      summoned to observe you, snubbing none, or know that you are robbing
      people of their time and spurning their gift of attention. Let that
      serve as your guide, and you will be sure not to fail, no matter
      whether you are selected by the Royals. Competitions come and go;
      reputation remains. Which has the greater value?

      My hero. What he said!

      Jehanne de Wodeford
    • storybard@aol.com
      IMHO, period-wise it is always best to please your patrons especially the Crown. However, in a modern society I would definitely work for the entire audience
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 4, 2008
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            IMHO, period-wise it is always best to please your patrons especially the Crown. However, in a modern society I would definitely work for the entire audience with permission from the Crown or patron.
            I was recently involved in just this. I stood before the Crown (actually two sets of Royals), introduced
        myself directly to Them, and explained that I would like to tell a story specifically for the children in the audience "by Your leave." They consented with a nod and I proceeded. In this case, most of the audience was sitting between me and the Royal Thrones so there was no need to turn my back to the Crown. If I had been a position that required me to turn and face the populace with my back to the Crown, I would ask Their permission to do so and step off to the side so They too could see and hear.
            There were a handful of people behind me, but I was able to turn my head toward those people on occasion without turning my back to my Patrons.
            If the Crown had denied my request, then I could not have done the same thing. I would have obeyed Their wishes. However, I have never in my twenty years as a bard met a Royal who did not allow me to perform for the populace. While sometimes I meet Royals who do not really want to listen, They have never denied this kind of request.
         
        Gabrielle d'Auvergne
        AEthelmaerc
        Barony of Rhyderrich Hael




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