Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA_BARDS] Songs of death - any good period ones off the top of your head?

Expand Messages
  • Kimberly Sargen
    Thank you everyone for your wonderful suggestions. I should, however, have been a bit more specific - this is for a late period (16th century) salon. The
    Message 1 of 20 , May 19, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you everyone for your wonderful suggestions. I should, however, have
      been a bit more specific - this is for a late period (16th century) salon.
      The theme is death - nothing more specific than that. And I've been having
      an overload of Dowland of late - I taught a class on his lute songs not long
      ago. *LOL* Not to say I don't adore his work, but I'm looking outside that
      as well - don't want to known as Jenny Onenote. 8)

      And yes, I have every intention of doing some of those "petite morte" songs.
      How can you pass those up?

      8)
      Veronica
    • mit1369
      I ve always liked Rearguard s Lament . It s available on the Cantaria site. Uadahlrich Midrealm ... The people who make a difference in your life are not
      Message 2 of 20 , May 19, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I've always liked "Rearguard's Lament". It's available on the "Cantaria" site.

        Uadahlrich
        Midrealm

        -----Original Message-----
        >From: Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@...>
        >Sent: May 19, 2008 3:39 PM
        >To: "SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com" <SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com>
        >Subject: [SCA_BARDS] Songs of death - any good period ones off the top of your head?
        >
        >I've been invited to perform at a little gathering at an upcoming SCA event,
        >and the theme is death. I haven't anything in my repertoire of period stuff
        >(I do mostly late period vocal stuff) that really suits.
        >
        >Anyone got any ideas? Solo voice, or voice and lute or guitar will work.
        >Foreign languages don't bother me, either... I'm just sort of stumped on
        >where to start looking at the moment...
        >
        >8)
        >Signora Veronica da Lugano
        >7th Bard of the West
        >(who should otherwise be known as the Mushroom Bard)
        >(who needs a brief break from John Dowland...)
        >


        The people who make a difference in your life are not the ones with the most credentials....the most money...or the most awards.

        They simply are the ones who care the most.


        ________________________________________
        PeoplePC Online
        A better way to Internet
        http://www.peoplepc.com
      • Amy Somerfield
        It s almost period but Rickitty, Tickitty, Tin is always fun with death. an entire family gets bumped off. Kimberly Sargen wrote:
        Message 3 of 20 , May 20, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          It's almost period but Rickitty, Tickitty, Tin is always fun with death.  an entire family gets bumped off.

          Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@...> wrote:
          Thank you everyone for your wonderful suggestions. I should, however, have
          been a bit more specific - this is for a late period (16th century) salon.
          The theme is death - nothing more specific than that. And I've been having
          an overload of Dowland of late - I taught a class on his lute songs not long
          ago. *LOL* Not to say I don't adore his work, but I'm looking outside that
          as well - don't want to known as Jenny Onenote. 8)

          And yes, I have every intention of doing some of those "petite morte" songs.
          How can you pass those up?

          8)
          Veronica




          Justice --- When you get what you deserve

          Mercy ----- When you don't get what you deserve

          Grace ----- When you get what you don't deserve

        • wannabanerdsomeday
          What plague is greater than the grief of mind? The grief of mind that eats in every vein; In every vein that leaves such clots behind; Such clots behind as
          Message 4 of 20 , May 20, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            What plague is greater than the grief of mind?
            The grief of mind that eats in every vein;
            In every vein that leaves such clots behind;
            Such clots behind as breed such bitter pain;
            So bitter pain that none shall ever find,
            What plague is greater than the grief of mind.
            E. of Ox
            http://www.elizabethanauthors.com/oxfordpoems.htm

            May not be a good fit, but it is Elizabethan, and there is a largish
            collection of period poems on the site. Stumbled across it when I was
            trying to find the lyrics to a song that begins "I met a soldier on a
            hill, he wore a tattered cloak. . . " Anyone have them?
            --R

            --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thank you everyone for your wonderful suggestions. I should,
            however, have
            > been a bit more specific - this is for a late period (16th century)
            salon.
            > The theme is death - nothing more specific than that. And I've
            been having
            > an overload of Dowland of late - I taught a class on his lute songs
            not long
            > ago. *LOL* Not to say I don't adore his work, but I'm looking
            outside that
            > as well - don't want to known as Jenny Onenote. 8)
            >
            > And yes, I have every intention of doing some of those "petite
            morte" songs.
            > How can you pass those up?
            >
            > 8)
            > Veronica
            >
          • Paul DeLisle
            *sigh*.and.here we go again.. My dear. Rickety Tickety Tin can t be period.unless Tom Lehrer is 450 years old (it was written by him in about 1960.) No harm,
            Message 5 of 20 , May 20, 2008
            • 0 Attachment

              *sigh*…and…here we go again….

               

              My dear…”Rickety Tickety Tin” can’t be period…unless Tom Lehrer is 450 years’ old (it was written by him in about 1960.)

               

              No harm, no foul…but do look things up …Mr. Lehrer’s alternate title to that piece is “An Irish Traditional Ballad” (which gives you a clue about what “traditional” means…..i.e. that either someone was too lazy to look up the author, or that the author can’t be found [usually the former.])

               

              In Service, I remain

              Alden Pharamond

              (and served him up as an Irish stew…….and invited the neighbors in…)

               

               

              From: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Amy Somerfield
              Sent: Tuesday, May 20, 2008 7:57 AM
              To: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SCA_BARDS] Songs of death - any good period ones off the top of your head?

               

              It's almost period but Rickitty, Tickitty, Tin is always fun with death.  an entire family gets bumped off.

              Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@...> wrote:

              Thank you everyone for your wonderful suggestions. I should, however, have
              been a bit more specific - this is for a late period (16th century) salon.
              The theme is death - nothing more specific than that. And I've been having
              an overload of Dowland of late - I taught a class on his lute songs not long
              ago. *LOL* Not to say I don't adore his work, but I'm looking outside that
              as well - don't want to known as Jenny Onenote. 8)

              And yes, I have every intention of doing some of those "petite morte" songs.
              How can you pass those up?

              8)
              Veronica




              Justice --- When you get what you deserve

              Mercy ----- When you don't get what you deserve

              Grace ----- When you get what you don't deserve

               

            • Michael B. Greenstein
              ... It must be. I mean, I sang that at my first bardic circle, and they went and made me a Laurel, so doesn t it follow? Okay, there might have been a small
              Message 6 of 20 , May 20, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                >My dear."Rickety Tickety Tin" can't be period

                It must be. I mean, I sang that at my first bardic circle, and they went and made me a Laurel, so doesn't it follow?

                Okay, there might have been a small hiatus between the two events, but still...

                - Michael
              • Greg Lindahl
                ... I took Music Appreciation in college, and I wrote an essay on the final about how PDQ Bach s compositions seemed awfully modern for someone who was
                Message 7 of 20 , May 20, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  On Tue, May 20, 2008 at 05:47:04PM -0500, Paul DeLisle wrote:

                  > My dear."Rickety Tickety Tin" can't be period.unless Tom Lehrer is 450
                  > years' old (it was written by him in about 1960.)

                  I took Music Appreciation in college, and I wrote an essay on the
                  final about how PDQ Bach's compositions seemed awfully modern for
                  someone who was purpotedly JS Bach's son. I don't think the grader got
                  it. Oh well.

                  -- Gregory
                • Richard
                  Well neither is strictly period as they re Irish folks songs, but depending on how you wish to you, There s Finnegan s Wake for the humorous bent on death
                  Message 8 of 20 , May 20, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Well neither is strictly period as they're Irish folks songs, but
                    depending on how you wish to you, There's Finnegan's Wake for the
                    humorous bent on "death" which you can find on hudreds of Irish folk
                    song compilations.
                    A little more depressing and rare is "There were Roses" or i've
                    heard it titled "The Red Roses" I just make one very very minor
                    change to make Car into Cart and there's nothing SCA objectionable
                    about it. It is very depressing though and is about a Catholic friend
                    and a Protestant friend who were each killed for their beliefs, one
                    in reprisal for the random killing of the other even though he didn't
                    have anything to do with it.

                    Driscoll

                    --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I've been invited to perform at a little gathering at an upcoming
                    SCA event,
                    > and the theme is death. I haven't anything in my repertoire of
                    period stuff
                    > (I do mostly late period vocal stuff) that really suits.
                    >
                    > Anyone got any ideas? Solo voice, or voice and lute or guitar will
                    work.
                    > Foreign languages don't bother me, either... I'm just sort of
                    stumped on
                    > where to start looking at the moment...
                    >
                    > 8)
                    > Signora Veronica da Lugano
                    > 7th Bard of the West
                    > (who should otherwise be known as the Mushroom Bard)
                    > (who needs a brief break from John Dowland...)
                    >
                  • Tim Jennings
                    Tommy Sands wrote the piece (Roses) in about 1974 following the very real incident in Northern Ireland that it describes. It s a great one, but its very much
                    Message 9 of 20 , May 20, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment

                      Tommy Sands wrote the piece  (Roses) in about 1974 following the very real incident in Northern Ireland that it describes. It’s a great one, but its very much a part of the Irish rebellion period (Post 1800) and more specifically the troubles of the 1960’s through the 80’s.

                       

                      There are very few Irish or Scots ‘trad style’ pieces in English from period (pre 1600) or even near period. Maybe a cpl dozen in total. Most period music is not of this style at all. A Few pieces begin the transition, but its sound is really quite modern

                       

                      Doesn’t mean don’t sing stuff of a more modern type, but its good to understand that when we sing something like ‘Roses’ at a bardic circle, it is not any kind of attempt at mediaeval or ren music – just fun of the kind the SCA often enjoys. We like the images. Heck –I think generally we are much more interested in the Victorianized ideals of chivalry and knighthood then the mediaeval ones…but knowing which is which is the battle.

                       

                      Feel free to drop by Harpwood Hall at Pennsic and sing itJ We like a variety of music!

                       

                       In fact (blatant plug) I have Eugene Rea and Noni Crete coming to play at an SCA event pub (The Raven) this wknd in Ealdormere. Eugene Rea is Tommy Sands cousin and one of the original members of the Sands Family (who are awesome!!). He’s also won the Irish national penny whistle and Mandolin championships in the grand master categoryJ Should be fun to listen and Noni has an incredible voice.

                       

                      Tim/Garraed

                       

                       

                       

                      Tim Jennings

                      Managing Director

                      Roseneath Theatre

                      519-787-2399

                      www.roseneath.ca

                      ***

                      A proud member of International Performing Arts for Youth

                      www.ipayweb.org

                       

                       

                      From: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard
                      Sent: May 20, 2008 8:40 PM
                      To: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [SCA_BARDS] Re: Songs of death - any good period ones off the top of your head?

                       

                      Well neither is strictly period as they're Irish folks songs, but
                      depending on how you wish to you, There's Finnegan's Wake for the
                      humorous bent on "death" which you can find on hudreds of Irish folk
                      song compilations.
                      A little more depressing and rare is "There were Roses" or i've
                      heard it titled "The Red Roses" I just make one very very minor
                      change to make Car into Cart and there's nothing SCA objectionable
                      about it. It is very depressing though and is about a Catholic friend
                      and a Protestant friend who were each killed for their beliefs, one
                      in reprisal for the random killing of the other even though he didn't
                      have anything to do with it.

                      Driscoll

                      --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@...> wrote:

                      >
                      > I've been invited to perform at a little gathering at an upcoming
                      SCA event,
                      > and the theme is death. I haven't anything in my repertoire of
                      period stuff
                      > (I do mostly late period vocal stuff) that really suits.
                      >
                      > Anyone got any ideas? Solo voice, or voice and lute or guitar will
                      work.
                      > Foreign languages don't bother me, either... I'm just sort of
                      stumped on
                      > where to start looking at the moment...
                      >
                      > 8)
                      > Signora Veronica da Lugano
                      > 7th Bard of the West
                      > (who should otherwise be known as the Mushroom Bard)
                      > (who needs a brief break from John Dowland...)
                      >

                    • wodeford
                      ... SCA event, ... period stuff ... Yahoo appears to have eaten my previous post, so let s try again, shall we? Ad mortem festinamus from the Llibre Vermell
                      Message 10 of 20 , May 20, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I've been invited to perform at a little gathering at an upcoming
                        SCA event,
                        > and the theme is death. I haven't anything in my repertoire of
                        period stuff
                        > (I do mostly late period vocal stuff) that really suits.

                        Yahoo appears to have eaten my previous post, so let's try again,
                        shall we?

                        "Ad mortem festinamus" from the Llibre Vermell might do you:
                        Lyrics and midi file can be found here:
                        http://brassy.club.fr/PartMed/LiVerm/LiVerm.html

                        Scroll down for full lyrics and translation.
                        http://www.sarband.de/Programs/Fran%8Dais/FR-Llibreall.html

                        And there's "Man Mai Longe", lyrics can be found here:
                        http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/articles/filk.and.the.sca.html
                        And of course, I can't FIND the book that I think has notation for it.

                        If you want something late period in more recognizable English,
                        there's always Orlando Gibbons' "The Silver Swan," which is about as
                        short and sweet as it gets.

                        I may think of more later.

                        Jehanne de Wodeford
                        West
                      • Melissa Widmaier
                        Very depressing. :( I m Irish who started off Protestant and I m now Catholic. This song just kills me when I hear it, but it truly is haunting and beautiful.
                        Message 11 of 20 , May 21, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment

                          Very depressing. :(

                          I'm Irish who started off Protestant and I'm now Catholic. This song just kills me when I hear it, but it truly is haunting and beautiful.

                           

                          Viola Howell


                           

                          "There's nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and open a vein." ~ Walter Wellesley "Red" Smith

                          http://Melissa-Widmaier.imagekind.com  http://www.myspace.com/violahowl    


                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: Richard <wuuga@...>
                          To: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Tuesday, May 20, 2008 5:40:17 PM
                          Subject: [SCA_BARDS] Re: Songs of death - any good period ones off the top of your head?

                          Well neither is strictly period as they're Irish folks songs, but
                          depending on how you wish to you, There's Finnegan's Wake for the
                          humorous bent on "death" which you can find on hudreds of Irish folk
                          song compilations.
                          A little more depressing and rare is "There were Roses" or i've
                          heard it titled "The Red Roses" I just make one very very minor
                          change to make Car into Cart and there's nothing SCA objectionable
                          about it. It is very depressing though and is about a Catholic friend
                          and a Protestant friend who were each killed for their beliefs, one
                          in reprisal for the random killing of the other even though he didn't
                          have anything to do with it.

                          Driscoll

                          --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogrou ps.com, Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@... > wrote:
                          >
                          > I've been invited to perform at a little gathering at an upcoming
                          SCA event,
                          > and the theme is death. I haven't anything in my repertoire of
                          period stuff
                          > (I do mostly late period vocal stuff) that really suits.
                          >
                          > Anyone got any ideas? Solo voice, or voice and lute or guitar will
                          work.
                          > Foreign languages don't bother me, either... I'm just sort of
                          stumped on
                          > where to start looking at the moment...
                          >
                          > 8)
                          > Signora Veronica da Lugano
                          > 7th Bard of the West
                          > (who should otherwise be known as the Mushroom Bard)
                          > (who needs a brief break from John Dowland...)
                          >


                        • katrinaofcoventry
                          Off the top of my head - try these: Bonnie Earl of Murray (Child 181) and the companion song, Willie Macintosh / Burning of Auchindoun (Child 183) Mediæval
                          Message 12 of 20 , May 21, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Off the top of my head - try these:

                            Bonnie Earl of Murray (Child 181) and the companion song, Willie
                            Macintosh / Burning of Auchindoun (Child 183)

                            Mediæval Bæbes also does a great German song called "So Spricht Das
                            Leben," dated apx 1470 ce. It's a great dialog back and forth
                            between "Life" and "Death" about which one of them the world belongs
                            to. It's on their "Worldes Blysse" album.

                            If you don't mind going a bit post-period, you could try "Down Among
                            the Dead Men."

                            Good luck!
                            Kat
                          • Lady Aneleda Cytheria Falconbridge
                            Far from Dowland: The classic Three Ravens is pretty deathy, lovely and a bit gorey. Full Fathon Five has many variations, and I would say that of his
                            Message 13 of 20 , May 21, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Far from Dowland:

                              The classic "Three Ravens" is pretty deathy, lovely and a bit gorey.

                              "Full Fathon Five" has many variations, and I would say that "of his
                              bones are coral made...etc," fits the theme.

                              "Lord Randall" (or Durante My Son, or any variation thereof) can be
                              argued to be appropriate as well, and maybe even older variations of
                              "Barb'ry/Barbara/Barbwee Allen" (hey, they supposedly made it to
                              America before 1600, so that fits for me!)

                              And while looking for something else, I found a composer which had a
                              lot of "death" in the lyric at least - Danish composer (Mogens
                              Pedersøn (a. 1585-1623). Check out
                              http://icking-music-archive.org/scores/pederson/madrigali.html for
                              more. I think that the actual music files require lilypond to open,
                              but it may be a jumping-off point.

                              Let us know what you perform!!! (And hear!)

                              - Aneleda Falconbridge



                              --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Kimberly Sargen <ksargen@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Thank you everyone for your wonderful suggestions. I should,
                              however, have
                              > been a bit more specific - this is for a late period (16th century)
                              salon.
                              > The theme is death - nothing more specific than that. And I've been
                              having
                              > an overload of Dowland of late - I taught a class on his lute songs
                              not long
                              > ago. *LOL* Not to say I don't adore his work, but I'm looking
                              outside that
                              > as well - don't want to known as Jenny Onenote. 8)
                              >
                              > And yes, I have every intention of doing some of those "petite
                              morte" songs.
                              > How can you pass those up?
                              >
                              > 8)
                              > Veronica
                              >
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.