Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

My latest doggerel (bawdy, with introduction, comments sought)

Expand Messages
  • Jeff Suzuki
    In a (probably futile) attempt to expand my limited skill set, I set myself to the challenge of writing a bawdy piece... Before I get to the song, a few
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      In a (probably futile) attempt to expand my limited skill set, I set
      myself to the challenge of writing a bawdy piece...

      Before I get to the song, a few questions. My strong desire is to
      produce a piece that is risque/bawdy, but definitely *not*
      pornographic. Oliver Wendell Holmes aside, I'm wondering if anyone
      out there has thoughts on where the line is. More generally, what
      makes a song bawdy?

      The music is bransle pinagay; the song is inspired by a story from
      the Decameron (tenth tale, third day for those who are interested).
      Comments are welcome, as this is a relatively new area for me. If
      anyone should feel inspired, the song is amenable to limitless
      expansion (open source creative license granted herewith, etc., etc.)

      I'll also leave a bit of space, to allow for the parental advisory.
      .
      .
      .
      Warning! Adult content ahead!
      .
      .
      .
      ====================
      Alibech a monk did tell
      Tan-a-ra
      How the devil's put in hell
      Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

      Chorus
      But too quick his vigor spent
      So to another land she went.

      She helped Pisa's architect
      Tan-a-ra
      Keep his leaning tow'r erect
      Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

      Chorus

      When the king of France she saw
      Tan-a-ra
      Held his fleur-de-lys in awe
      Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

      Chorus

      When she saw the Dauphin dance
      Tan-a-ra
      Took his fish for all of France
      Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

      Chorus

      Fooled by bankers in their stalls
      Tan-a-ra
      For their signs display three balls
      Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

      Chorus

      Onto Moscow, the third Rome
      Tan-a-ra
      Climbed the Tsar's great onion dome
      Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

      Chorus

      Next the sultan and his court
      Tan-a-ra
      Took her through the sublime port
      Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

      Chorus

      Now she's gone to who knows where
      Tan-a-ra
      Chasing devils to their lair
      Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra
      =======================
      http://www.geocities.com/jeff_suzuki/eightylays.htm
    • Rick Greene
      I would say this classifies as bawdy...to those in the know (ie: adults) the lines are pretty explicit, but to kids it doesn t make much sense. I would
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        I would say this classifies as bawdy...to those "in the know" (ie:
        adults) the lines are pretty explicit, but to kids it doesn't make
        much sense. I would think it'd be safe enough if young-un's are about.

        I'm reminded of a (forgive me for this reference) line I've heard in
        the intro for a number of renaissance faire shows..."Parents, if your
        kids get these jokes, it's not our fault!". Similarly, a side
        comment after a racy remark by a performer: "Kids, ask your parents
        to explain that one later".

        I love this piece in and of itself, can easily see how this could be
        a good group-participation thing with at least the tan-a-ra, if not
        the chorus as well.

        I'm a bit confused by the first verse, however, doesn't quite seem to
        fit the rest. All the other verses seem to be about the woman, but
        that first verse doesn't seem to refer to her at all? Not knowing
        the inspiring story, did I miss something?

        Almost cries out for some knight/fencer/archer themed lines, how
        about these (can't believe I'm trying to write lyrics...it's not what I do)

        When she saw the knight's big lance
        She gave him a second chance

        She gave the archer a lark
        To see if he'd hit the mark

        Saw the fencer's long bright blade
        So she took him to the glade

        Wormwood
      • mathurin@forgottensea.org
        ... Most definitions of pornography specify that it has no artistic value. It is also a fixed form, such as print, drawing, photograph. And it is a relatively
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Jeff Suzuki said:

          > Before I get to the song, a few questions. My strong desire is to
          > produce a piece that is risque/bawdy, but definitely *not*
          > pornographic. Oliver Wendell Holmes aside, I'm wondering if anyone
          > out there has thoughts on where the line is. More generally, what
          > makes a song bawdy?

          Most definitions of pornography specify that it has no artistic value. It
          is also a fixed form, such as print, drawing, photograph. And it is a
          relatively new word, not appearing before the mid-19th C.

          "Bawdy" is, by definition, lewd, obscene, vulgar, coarse. The root of the
          word is a synonym for "prostitute", "madam", and/or "pimp". See a
          fabliaux, such as "The Priest Who Peeked", for an example of Period
          bawdry; little is left to the imagination.

          For what you appear to be after, i.e., adult-but-not-obscene, the typical,
          mixed-company, double-entendre is a pretty safe line to draw. And you seem
          to have nailed it....if you will pardon the expression. :)

          Mathurin
        • Marcus Antaya
          OMG, you have to send me the tune for this...I ll include it in my Bawdy songs class at pennsic, with permission...I love it!!! And as to where the line is
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            OMG, you have to send me the tune for this...I'll include it in my Bawdy songs class at pennsic, with permission...I love it!!!
             
            And as to where the line is drawn, it depends on your audience...so some, the Jolly Butcher is bawdy enough, to others The Keyhole in the Door. I think we can all agree the The Ball or Balinoor is over the line...but then I usually see the line far in the distance behind me, so there you go...LOL.
             
            Come to my class and expand your repetoire...it comes with your very own songbook....(shameless plug)
             
            Gyric

            Jeff Suzuki <jeff_suzuki@...> wrote:
            In a (probably futile) attempt to expand my limited skill set, I set
            myself to the challenge of writing a bawdy piece...

            Before I get to the song, a few questions. My strong desire is to
            produce a piece that is risque/bawdy, but definitely *not*
            pornographic. Oliver Wendell Holmes aside, I'm wondering if anyone
            out there has thoughts on where the line is. More generally, what
            makes a song bawdy?

            The music is bransle pinagay; the song is inspired by a story from
            the Decameron (tenth tale, third day for those who are interested).
            Comments are welcome, as this is a relatively new area for me. If
            anyone should feel inspired, the song is amenable to limitless
            expansion (open source creative license granted herewith, etc., etc.)

            I'll also leave a bit of space, to allow for the parental advisory.
            .
            .
            .
            Warning! Adult content ahead!
            .
            .
            .
            ============ ========
            Alibech a monk did tell
            Tan-a-ra
            How the devil's put in hell
            Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

            Chorus
            But too quick his vigor spent
            So to another land she went.

            She helped Pisa's architect
            Tan-a-ra
            Keep his leaning tow'r erect
            Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

            Chorus

            When the king of France she saw
            Tan-a-ra
            Held his fleur-de-lys in awe
            Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

            Chorus

            When she saw the Dauphin dance
            Tan-a-ra
            Took his fish for all of France
            Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

            Chorus

            Fooled by bankers in their stalls
            Tan-a-ra
            For their signs display three balls
            Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

            Chorus

            Onto Moscow, the third Rome
            Tan-a-ra
            Climbed the Tsar's great onion dome
            Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

            Chorus

            Next the sultan and his court
            Tan-a-ra
            Took her through the sublime port
            Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra

            Chorus

            Now she's gone to who knows where
            Tan-a-ra
            Chasing devils to their lair
            Tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra, tan-a-ra
            ============ ========= ==
            http://www.geocitie s.com/jeff_ suzuki/eightylay s.htm




            Lord Gyric of Otershaghe
            Troubadour, Entertainer and generally all-around nice guy
            REMEMBER: Eagles may soar, but Weasels don't get sucked into jet engines....


            Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers.

          • Kevin Brock
            ... what I do) ... It s a reference to the Decameron (3rd day, 10th story) - Alibech is the name of a girl who is seduced by a monk. Sexual intercourse is
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Rick Greene <rickg@...> wrote:
              >
              > I would say this classifies as bawdy...to those "in the know" (ie:
              > adults) the lines are pretty explicit, but to kids it doesn't make
              > much sense. I would think it'd be safe enough if young-un's are about.
              >
              > I'm reminded of a (forgive me for this reference) line I've heard in
              > the intro for a number of renaissance faire shows..."Parents, if your
              > kids get these jokes, it's not our fault!". Similarly, a side
              > comment after a racy remark by a performer: "Kids, ask your parents
              > to explain that one later".
              >
              > I love this piece in and of itself, can easily see how this could be
              > a good group-participation thing with at least the tan-a-ra, if not
              > the chorus as well.
              >
              > I'm a bit confused by the first verse, however, doesn't quite seem to
              > fit the rest. All the other verses seem to be about the woman, but
              > that first verse doesn't seem to refer to her at all? Not knowing
              > the inspiring story, did I miss something?
              >
              > Almost cries out for some knight/fencer/archer themed lines, how
              > about these (can't believe I'm trying to write lyrics...it's not
              what I do)
              >
              > When she saw the knight's big lance
              > She gave him a second chance
              >
              > She gave the archer a lark
              > To see if he'd hit the mark
              >
              > Saw the fencer's long bright blade
              > So she took him to the glade
              >
              > Wormwood
              >

              It's a reference to the Decameron (3rd day, 10th story) - Alibech is
              the name of a girl who is seduced by a monk. Sexual intercourse is
              referred to by the monk as "putting the devil back in hell." The first
              line, I believe, is meant to read (in a SVO sentence structure) "A
              monk did tell Alibech..."

              I hope this helps!

              Olivier de Bayonne
              Atlantia
            • Sean Graethorne
              Testify, Kinsman! And, may I say that I m absolutely thrilled to see the constructive and open discourse on bawdy material here? Very refreshing. Too often,
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Testify, Kinsman!
                 
                And, may I say that I'm absolutely thrilled to see the constructive and open discourse on bawdy material here?  Very refreshing.  Too often, the "line" is a faint boundary between the two extremes of propriety or rugby songs... and VERY emotional stances, usually exclusive, at either end.  There need to be more layers betwixt, sez I.
                 
                Sean
                 

                Marcus Antaya <lordgyric@...> wrote:
                ...I usually see the line far in the distance behind me...


                Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story.
                Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.

              • Jeff Suzuki
                ... Thanks! Feel free to include it. There are a few versions of pinagay floating around on the web; I put up a midi version on my site at
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- Marcus Antaya <lordgyric@...> wrote:

                  > OMG, you have to send me the tune for this...I'll
                  > include it in my Bawdy songs class at pennsic, with
                  > permission...I love it!!!

                  Thanks! Feel free to include it.

                  There are a few versions of pinagay floating around on
                  the web; I put up a midi version on my site at

                  http://www.geocities.com/jeff_suzuki/music/pinagay.mid

                  (which runs a bit fast, now that I listen to it).

                  Jeffs/etc.



                  ____________________________________________________________________________________
                  Take the Internet to Go: Yahoo!Go puts the Internet in your pocket: mail, news, photos & more.
                  http://mobile.yahoo.com/go?refer=1GNXIC
                • Jeff Suzuki
                  ... Alibech s the girl s name; the particular story is at http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/decameron/engDecShowText.php? myID=nov0310&expand=day03 among other
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, Rick Greene <rickg@...> wrote:

                    > I'm a bit confused by the first verse, however, doesn't quite seem to
                    > fit the rest. All the other verses seem to be about the woman, but
                    > that first verse doesn't seem to refer to her at all? Not knowing
                    > the inspiring story, did I miss something?

                    Alibech's the girl's name; the particular story is at

                    http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/decameron/engDecShowText.php?
                    myID=nov0310&expand=day03

                    among other places, though as I scan through the story, they declined
                    to translate the relevant sections. The story is *extremely* risque:
                    if you wrote this story today, you'd probably be up on charges. I
                    personally would not tell it unless I was absolutely certain of my
                    audience.

                    Enjoyed the additional verses. (The original idea was to go through
                    various professions---cooper, chandler, etc., but the only verse I
                    could get to work was the architect one. The knight/archer/fencer
                    theme works very well, and I wish I'd thought of it...)

                    Jeffs/etc.
                  • jenny tavernier
                    Heh - never even thought of my limerick (which delightifully would seem to fit along your lines - as bawdy - very fun and Thanks! I just thought of it as
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Heh - never even thought of my limerick (which delightifully would seem to fit along your lines - as bawdy - very fun and  Thanks! I just thought of it as silly!

                      Did You Hear of the Lady of Ghent
                      Who's gown was impossibly rent
                      It was during a joust
                      so a knight helped her oust
                      with his lance they re-paired to his tent


                      Jen






                      Looking for a deal? Find great prices on flights and hotels with Yahoo! FareChase.
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.