Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Looking for music

Expand Messages
  • N.E. Star
    Hello, I have a friend that is directing a production of A Midsummer Night s Dream and (knowing about my SCA interests) has asked if I could help him with
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello,
       
        I have a friend that is directing a production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and (knowing about my SCA interests) has asked if I could help him with some music. Now I'm more of a signer then musician, so if anyone has ideas I would love the help.
       
         Naomi Corkajana
       
      “Fairies Lullaby” (There are four main fairies, so I was thinking a round might be cool for this)
      You spotted snakes with double tongue,
      Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen;
      Newts and blind-worms, do no wrong,
      Come not near our fairy queen.
      Philomel, with melody
      Sing in our sweet lullaby;
      Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby:
      Never harm,
      Nor spell nor charm,
      Come our lovely lady nigh;
      So, good night, with lullaby.
      Weaving spiders, come not here;
      Hence, you long-legg'd spinners, hence!
      Beetles black, approach not near;
      Worm nor snail, do no offence.
      Philomel, with melody,
      Sing in our sweet lullaby;
      Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby
       
      "Bottom's song"
      The ousel cock so black of hue,
      With orange-tawny bill,
      The throstle with his note so true,
      The wren with little quill,--
      The finch, the sparrow and the lark,
      The plain-song cuckoo gray,
      Whose note full many a man doth mark,
      And dares not answer nay;--
      for, indeed, who would set his wit to so foolish
      a bird? who would give a bird the lie, though he cry
      'cuckoo' never so?
       
      "No Title Given To Me"
      Roses, their sharp spines be gone,
      Not royal in their smells alone,
      But in their hue.
      Maiden pinks, of odor faint,
      Daisies smell-less, yet most quaint
      And sweet thyme true;
       
      Primrose, first-born child of Ver,
      Merry spring-time's harbinger,
      With harebells dim;
      Oxlips in their cradle growing,
      Marigolds, on death-beds blowing,
      Lark's-heels trim;
       
      All dear Nature's children sweet
      Lie 'fore bride and bridegroom's feet,
      Blessing their sense;
      Not an angel of the air,
      Bird melodious, or bird fair,
      Is absent hence;
       
      The crow, the sland'rous cuckoo, nor
      The boding raven, nor chough hoar,
      Nor chatt'ring pie,
      May on our birdhouse perch or sing,
      Or with them any discord bring,
      But from it fly.
       


      Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs. Try it free.
    • Sydney Walker Freedman
      If I remember correctly, the fairies say assigned parts of the lullaby, so a round might not work. But, if this is the case, one can always change things. :)
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 5, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        If I remember correctly, the fairies say assigned parts of the lullaby, so
        a round might not work. But, if this is the case, one can always change
        things. :) Is your friend interested in music for ambience, as a
        prelude, or what? I have a lot of information on music in Shakespeare's
        plays, so just let me know what you're looking for specifically.

        > Hello,
        >
        > I have a friend that is directing a production of "A Midsummer Night's
        > Dream" and (knowing about my SCA interests) has asked if I could help
        > him with some music. Now I'm more of a signer then musician, so if
        > anyone has ideas I would love the help.
        >
        > Naomi Corkajana
        >
        > “Fairies Lullaby” (There are four main fairies, so I was thinking a
        > round might be cool for this)
        > You spotted snakes with double tongue,
        > Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen;
        > Newts and blind-worms, do no wrong,
        > Come not near our fairy queen.
        > Philomel, with melody
        > Sing in our sweet lullaby;
        > Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby:
        > Never harm,
        > Nor spell nor charm,
        > Come our lovely lady nigh;
        > So, good night, with lullaby.
        > Weaving spiders, come not here;
        > Hence, you long-legg'd spinners, hence!
        > Beetles black, approach not near;
        > Worm nor snail, do no offence.
        > Philomel, with melody,
        > Sing in our sweet lullaby;
        > Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby
        >
        > "Bottom's song"
        > The ousel cock so black of hue,
        > With orange-tawny bill,
        > The throstle with his note so true,
        > The wren with little quill,--
        > The finch, the sparrow and the lark,
        > The plain-song cuckoo gray,
        > Whose note full many a man doth mark,
        > And dares not answer nay;--
        > for, indeed, who would set his wit to so foolish
        > a bird? who would give a bird the lie, though he cry
        > 'cuckoo' never so?
        >
        > "No Title Given To Me"
        >
        > Roses, their sharp spines be gone,
        > Not royal in their smells alone,
        > But in their hue.
        > Maiden pinks, of odor faint,
        > Daisies smell-less, yet most quaint
        > And sweet thyme true;
        >
        > Primrose, first-born child of Ver,
        > Merry spring-time's harbinger,
        > With harebells dim;
        > Oxlips in their cradle growing,
        > Marigolds, on death-beds blowing,
        > Lark's-heels trim;
        >
        > All dear Nature's children sweet
        > Lie 'fore bride and bridegroom's feet,
        > Blessing their sense;
        > Not an angel of the air,
        > Bird melodious, or bird fair,
        > Is absent hence;
        >
        > The crow, the sland'rous cuckoo, nor
        > The boding raven, nor chough hoar,
        > Nor chatt'ring pie,
        > May on our birdhouse perch or sing,
        > Or with them any discord bring,
        > But from it fly.
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.Try it free.


        Pax Christi,
        Sydney
      • Kristine Karol
        Theres a book called Shakespeare s Songbook by Ross W. Duffin which contains all the song references in Shakespeare s plays. The author researched all the
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 5, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Theres a book called "Shakespeare's Songbook" by Ross W. Duffin which contains all the song references in Shakespeare's plays. The author researched all the song references in the plays, and the book contains the lyrics, and tunes, for all the songs as best he could reconstruct from primary period sources. He gives all his documentation in the back of the book. The book even includes a CD so you can hear the songs being sung.
           
          The music you are looking for can be found in this book.
           
          ~Emmeline

           
          On 7/5/06, N.E. Star <n_e_star@...> wrote:

          Hello,
           
            I have a friend that is directing a production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and (knowing about my SCA interests) has asked if I could help him with some music. Now I'm more of a signer then musician, so if anyone has ideas I would love the help.
           
             Naomi Corkajana
           
          "Fairies Lullaby" (There are four main fairies, so I was thinking a round might be cool for this)
          You spotted snakes with double tongue,
          Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen;
          Newts and blind-worms, do no wrong,
          Come not near our fairy queen.
          Philomel, with melody
          Sing in our sweet lullaby;
          Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby:
          Never harm,
          Nor spell nor charm,
          Come our lovely lady nigh;
          So, good night, with lullaby.
          Weaving spiders, come not here;
          Hence, you long-legg'd spinners, hence!
          Beetles black, approach not near;
          Worm nor snail, do no offence.
          Philomel, with melody,
          Sing in our sweet lullaby;
          Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby
           
          "Bottom's song"
          The ousel cock so black of hue,
          With orange-tawny bill,
          The throstle with his note so true,
          The wren with little quill,--
          The finch, the sparrow and the lark,
          The plain-song cuckoo gray,
          Whose note full many a man doth mark,
          And dares not answer nay;--
          for, indeed, who would set his wit to so foolish
          a bird? who would give a bird the lie, though he cry
          'cuckoo' never so?
           
          "No Title Given To Me"
          Roses, their sharp spines be gone,
          Not royal in their smells alone,
          But in their hue.
          Maiden pinks, of odor faint,
          Daisies smell-less, yet most quaint
          And sweet thyme true;
           
          Primrose, first-born child of Ver,
          Merry spring-time's harbinger,
          With harebells dim;
          Oxlips in their cradle growing,
          Marigolds, on death-beds blowing,
          Lark's-heels trim;
           
          All dear Nature's children sweet
          Lie 'fore bride and bridegroom's feet,
          Blessing their sense;
          Not an angel of the air,
          Bird melodious, or bird fair,
          Is absent hence;
           
          The crow, the sland'rous cuckoo, nor
          The boding raven, nor chough hoar,
          Nor chatt'ring pie,
          May on our birdhouse perch or sing,
          Or with them any discord bring,
          But from it fly.
           


          Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs. Try it free.


        • n_e_star
          ... lullaby, so a round might not work. But, if this is the case, one ... Sydney, So far I know he wants the actors to sing the songs as they come on them in
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 6, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
            <freedmas@...> wrote:
            >
            > If I remember correctly, the fairies say assigned parts of the
            lullaby, so a round might not work. But, if this is the case, one
            > can always change things. :) Is your friend interested in music
            > for ambience, as a prelude, or what? I have a lot of information
            > on music in Shakespeare's plays, so just let me know what you're
            > looking for specifically.

            Sydney,

            So far I know he wants the actors to sing the songs as they come on
            them in the script. The lullaby would need something slow, if it
            could work a a round that would cool, if not, that's fine too. For
            Bottom I was thinking of a dinking song, something rough and loud
            (think of the sea-gull from "The Little Mermaid" wah, wah, wah-wa,
            wah. Wah WAH!!) The last song I found out is from something else so
            I'm not 100% sure what he wants for it (I'll be talking to him
            tonight about it).

            Any thing you have would be a huge help to me.
            Naomi Corkajana
          • Sydney Walker Freedman
            Let me look through my copy of the play, find all of the songs, and tell you what I have from there (hopefully later this evening). Meanwhile, it might be fun
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 6, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Let me look through my copy of the play, find all of the songs, and tell
              you what I have from there (hopefully later this evening). Meanwhile, it
              might be fun for you to listen to some recordings of the songs in
              Shakespeare's plays. There's a great early music show called Harmonia,
              and there's an episode in its online archives devoted to that. Go to
              http://harmonia.indiana.edu and go to the Archives link, then to Other
              Archives, and then to Shakespeare's Music. You'll need Real Player, which
              you can download for free. I'll also look around for a good Renaissance
              drinking song. I know of a really easy round off the top of my head
              that's by Thomas Morley (I think), and it might work. I'll get back to
              you in a little while.

              > --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
              > <freedmas@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> If I remember correctly, the fairies say assigned parts of the
              > lullaby, so a round might not work. But, if this is the case, one
              >> can always change things. :) Is your friend interested in music
              >> for ambience, as a prelude, or what? I have a lot of information
              >> on music in Shakespeare's plays, so just let me know what you're
              >> looking for specifically.
              >
              > Sydney,
              >
              > So far I know he wants the actors to sing the songs as they come on
              > them in the script. The lullaby would need something slow, if it
              > could work a a round that would cool, if not, that's fine too. For
              > Bottom I was thinking of a dinking song, something rough and loud
              > (think of the sea-gull from "The Little Mermaid" wah, wah, wah-wa,
              > wah. Wah WAH!!) The last song I found out is from something else so
              > I'm not 100% sure what he wants for it (I'll be talking to him
              > tonight about it).
              >
              > Any thing you have would be a huge help to me.
              > Naomi Corkajana
              >
              >
              >
              >


              Pax Christi,
              Sydney
            • Sydney Walker Freedman
              Feel free to give the person my e-mail address if he would like to contact me directly. ... Pax Christi, Sydney
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 6, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Feel free to give the person my e-mail address if he would like to contact
                me directly.

                > --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
                > <freedmas@...> wrote:
                >>
                >> If I remember correctly, the fairies say assigned parts of the
                > lullaby, so a round might not work. But, if this is the case, one
                >> can always change things. :) Is your friend interested in music
                >> for ambience, as a prelude, or what? I have a lot of information
                >> on music in Shakespeare's plays, so just let me know what you're
                >> looking for specifically.
                >
                > Sydney,
                >
                > So far I know he wants the actors to sing the songs as they come on
                > them in the script. The lullaby would need something slow, if it
                > could work a a round that would cool, if not, that's fine too. For
                > Bottom I was thinking of a dinking song, something rough and loud
                > (think of the sea-gull from "The Little Mermaid" wah, wah, wah-wa,
                > wah. Wah WAH!!) The last song I found out is from something else so
                > I'm not 100% sure what he wants for it (I'll be talking to him
                > tonight about it).
                >
                > Any thing you have would be a huge help to me.
                > Naomi Corkajana
                >
                >
                >
                >


                Pax Christi,
                Sydney
              • Greg Lindahl
                ... Ravenscroft has a couple of drinking songs, tons of rounds, and even a few drinking rounds. http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/songbook/ Duffin is a
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 6, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  On Thu, Jul 06, 2006 at 07:32:36PM -0500, Sydney Walker Freedman wrote:

                  > I'll also look around for a good Renaissance
                  > drinking song. I know of a really easy round off the top of my head
                  > that's by Thomas Morley (I think), and it might work.

                  Ravenscroft has a couple of drinking songs, tons of rounds, and even a
                  few drinking rounds.

                  http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/songbook/

                  Duffin is a really great book, I have a copy of it too.

                  -- Gregory
                • Sydney Walker Freedman
                  Perhaps the one I m thinking of is by Ravenscroft. It s a drinking round. Thanks. ... Pax Christi, Sydney
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 6, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Perhaps the one I'm thinking of is by Ravenscroft. It's a drinking round.
                    Thanks.

                    > On Thu, Jul 06, 2006 at 07:32:36PM -0500, Sydney Walker Freedman wrote:
                    >
                    >> I'll also look around for a good Renaissance
                    >> drinking song. I know of a really easy round off the top of my head
                    >> that's by Thomas Morley (I think), and it might work.
                    >
                    > Ravenscroft has a couple of drinking songs, tons of rounds, and even a
                    > few drinking rounds.
                    >
                    > http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/songbook/
                    >
                    > Duffin is a really great book, I have a copy of it too.
                    >
                    > -- Gregory
                    >
                    >


                    Pax Christi,
                    Sydney
                  • jenny tavernier
                    hah!! Late I am in checking my mails - yet fondly I remember OF ALL THE BIRDS - which is sung wonderfully by Oak Ash and Thorne, but the verse: Nose nose Jolly
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 7, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      hah!!
                       
                      Late I am in checking my mails - yet fondly I remember OF ALL THE BIRDS -
                       
                      which is sung wonderfully by Oak Ash and Thorne, but the verse:
                      Nose nose Jolly red Nose and who gave thee thy jolly red nose?
                      Nutmeg and Ginger, cinnamin and cloves -
                      and that's what gave thee a jolly red nose -
                       
                      I learned in Brownies when I was 9! (in ancient decades) to a different tune
                       
                      and Do not for get the good round:
                       
                      Kiss, oh kiss, oh darling won't you kiss me?
                      Oh! My oh my oh my she said - Oh my oh my oh my!
                      I can no longer live, I will kill myself with Acid!
                       
                      - A rather droll round learned in 73 at the Renaissance Faire in Marin, ca - (Valley of the moon) Sung correctly, at the end it yields:
                       
                      Kiss my A**, (ditto,) ( ditto )
                       
                      (My dear Lady J.  Wodeford may know this one too! LOL!)

                      Jen


                      Seige Mathematics. "The right angle to approach a difficult problem is the 'try-angle'" - anon.


                      softfooted insight
                      when they reached with their voice
                      they commanded a greater power and weaponry
                      beyond any mere mortal touch

                      ©2005JHT


                      How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger’s low PC-to-Phone call rates.
                    • jenny tavernier
                      Oops! Also forgot this one - My welsh granda used to sing this and others when there were family events and gatherings - with everyone else - (as a round)
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jul 7, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Oops! Also forgot this one -
                         
                        My welsh granda used to sing this and others when there were family events and gatherings - with everyone else - (as a round)
                         
                        However, hearing this when you are growing and quite young, for years I knew it as the child's eating ditty - (seemed right to me) of:
                         
                        Hold thy peas, I pray thee hold thy peas
                        thou knave, (hey! I was a kid - and it seemed applicable!) - hold thy peas
                        thou knave, thou knave  etc
                         
                        as a little kid I used to think a knave was either a  a big knife you spread things with - (you know - rhymed with lave - knave - as to spread with a knife: or a church ruffian!
                        (ah! beware the young! LOL!)
                         
                        And I always sang it when we had the toast of comfort foods!!!
                         
                        Creamed tuna and peas on toast!!!!!!! Yum!
                         
                        jen agin - lurking quickly in the wee hours.....



                        Seige Mathematics. "The right angle to approach a difficult problem is the 'try-angle'" - anon.


                        softfooted insight
                        when they reached with their voice
                        they commanded a greater power and weaponry
                        beyond any mere mortal touch

                        ©2005JHT


                        Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs. Try it free.
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.