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Quick intro and ? re documentation

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  • Jayde
    Hi all, I m an aspiring bard in the Reno, NV area. I ve got plenty of music background, but not so much performance & Medieval era music background. (This
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 6, 2005
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      Hi all,

      I'm an aspiring bard in the Reno, NV area. I've got plenty of music background, but not so much performance & Medieval era music background. (This doesn't seem like a chatty list, so I'll stop here...)

      Anyway, I'm interested in working with english-language "pub" and "folk" songs. How can I find documentation for this sort of music? My personal library is quite limited, the reference librarian at the county library just blinked at me, and I just don't think "traditional" is enough documentation for something to be "period".

      Thanks for the help,
      Jayde/Valdis Gydja (No I do not want Viking era music. :P )

      ****

      The first and great commandment is: Don't let them scare you. - E. Davis (1890 - 1958)
    • Greg Lindahl
      ... Valdis, May I suggest a couple of websites? http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ballads/ http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/ Thomas Ravenscroft published the
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 6, 2005
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        On Wed, Apr 06, 2005 at 04:29:40PM -0800, Jayde wrote:

        > Anyway, I'm interested in working with english-language "pub" and
        > "folk" songs. How can I find documentation for this sort of music?
        > My personal library is quite limited, the reference librarian at the
        > county library just blinked at me, and I just don't think
        > "traditional" is enough documentation for something to be "period".

        Valdis,

        May I suggest a couple of websites?

        http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ballads/
        http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/

        Thomas Ravenscroft published the first English collection of folksongs
        in 1609. In late period England, there was a lot of crossover between
        art music and 'popular' music.

        -- Gregory
      • tim jennings
        Heya, The majority of Pub music and trad is not period. There are under 40 extant English folk songs of that style that are fully documentable to period
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 6, 2005
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          Heya,

          The majority of Pub music and 'trad' is not period. There are under 40
          extant English 'folk' songs of that style that are fully documentable to
          period (that is, we have a primary source for them from Pre-1600)

          That said, music in the Society is certainly at least as much about
          creating atmosphere for your audience (who are mostly made up of
          medieval enthusiasts with a modern ear) as about being 'period'.

          I would suggest that you concentrate on finding music you like that
          seems consistent with the atmosphere of the events. That doesn't jar
          people out of their fantasy.

          You might look to website like www.mudcat.org or www.cantaria.com for
          lyric and document suggestions.

          Good luck. Please feel free to write me directly if you would like. I
          have a lot of this research done already, so you don't have to reinvent
          the wheel

          Slainte!

          Garraed

          Garraed Galbraith, OL
          Society MoAS
          Aka:
          Tim Jennings, Managing Director
          Roseneath Theatre
          +1 519 787 2399
          www.roseneath.ca


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Jayde [mailto:jayde@...]
          Sent: April 6, 2005 7:30 PM
          To: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [SCA_BARDS] Quick intro and ? re documentation


          Hi all,

          I'm an aspiring bard in the Reno, NV area. I've got plenty of music
          background, but not so much performance & Medieval era music background.
          (This doesn't seem like a chatty list, so I'll stop here...)

          Anyway, I'm interested in working with english-language "pub" and "folk"
          songs. How can I find documentation for this sort of music? My personal
          library is quite limited, the reference librarian at the county library
          just blinked at me, and I just don't think "traditional" is enough
          documentation for something to be "period".

          Thanks for the help,
          Jayde/Valdis Gydja (No I do not want Viking era music. :P )

          ****

          The first and great commandment is: Don't let them scare you. - E. Davis
          (1890 - 1958)



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        • Michael B. Greenstein
          ... Distinctions of what may actually have been sung in our period aside, there are some delightful albums put out by the Baltimore Consort. I particularly
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 6, 2005
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            > Anyway, I'm interested in working with english-language "pub" and "folk" songs. How can I find documentation for this sort of music?

            Distinctions of what may actually have been sung in our period aside, there are some delightful albums put out by the Baltimore Consort. I particularly recommend "Watkins Ale" and "The Art of the Bawdy Song."

            I hope you share your joy in song with us for a long time to come.

            - Michael
          • Susan Koziel
            Greetings, See what the others have posted about documentably period folk type songs. Frankly this is the easy way to document your songs, and I highly
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 6, 2005
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              Greetings,
              See what the others have posted about documentably
              period 'folk' type songs. Frankly this is the easy way
              to document your songs, and I highly recommend it to
              anyone starting into A&S type documentation.
              However, if you want to spent a ton of time
              documenting (and there are those who'd love you for
              doing this) you can spend time taking a trad song that
              has period themes and make a conjectural argument for
              the theme/story of the song being period. The music
              won't be period but a number of the trad ballads deal
              with stories which have themes that can be traced to
              period tales. This drops you deep into the realm of
              folklore studies, and it's a pretty grey area. You
              have to do a lot of work to make a case for 'your
              chosen folk song' to be considered period but many
              story tellers in the society (and academics out side
              the society) do make cases for tracing folk tales this
              way.
              It's not an easy way to document, and not something
              that you'd want to attempt as a beginner.
              If you decide to go this route (and it's a hard
              road full of pit falls) I can happily point you to
              some good online starting points.
              As for living far away from a good library - use
              your local (or nearest) college/university as a place
              to do on-line searches and then use inter-library
              loans through your local libary. It's not as quick but
              it works. I live on a farm about an hour from the
              nearest city... I use inter-library loans from my town
              library but specifically have a university libarary
              card so I can do online searches for book and music.
              The universities are all connected to each other (or
              most are) and if you find a book from a different
              university site you can get your local university to
              get it or a copy of it to you.
              To document things this way you need to be very
              patient and be willing to abandon things until new
              info turns up some times. You also end up doing lots
              and lots of reading - which isn't a chore if you like
              that sort of thing.
              ;)
              -Kataryna


              --- Jayde <jayde@...> wrote:
              > Hi all,
              >
              > I'm an aspiring bard in the Reno, NV area. I've got
              > plenty of music background, but not so much
              > performance & Medieval era music background. (This
              > doesn't seem like a chatty list, so I'll stop
              > here...)
              >
              > Anyway, I'm interested in working with
              > english-language "pub" and "folk" songs. How can I
              > find documentation for this sort of music? My
              > personal library is quite limited, the reference
              > librarian at the county library just blinked at me,
              > and I just don't think "traditional" is enough
              > documentation for something to be "period".
              >
              > Thanks for the help,
              > Jayde/Valdis Gydja (No I do not want Viking era
              > music. :P )
              >
              > ****
              >
              > The first and great commandment is: Don't let them
              > scare you. - E. Davis (1890 - 1958)
              >
            • wodeford
              ... something to be period . Good, cause it isn t. ;- Have you been to the Links section at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA_BARDS/ yet? There s some stuff
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 7, 2005
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                --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, "Jayde" <jayde@w...> wrote:
                > I just don't think "traditional" is enough documentation for
                something to be "period".

                Good, 'cause it isn't. ;->

                Have you been to the Links section at
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA_BARDS/ yet? There's some stuff there
                you can check out.

                Cheers,
                Jehanne de Wodeford, Province of the Mists
              • Greg Lindahl
                ... Here s a mini-review of the contents of The Art of the Bawdy Song: http://www.pbm.com/pipermail/minstrel/2000/004513.html It s mostly post-period
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 7, 2005
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                  On Wed, Apr 06, 2005 at 11:24:13PM -0400, Michael B. Greenstein wrote:

                  > Distinctions of what may actually have been sung in our period
                  > aside, there are some delightful albums put out by the Baltimore
                  > Consort. I particularly recommend "Watkins Ale" and "The Art of the
                  > Bawdy Song."

                  Here's a mini-review of the contents of "The Art of the Bawdy Song:"

                  http://www.pbm.com/pipermail/minstrel/2000/004513.html

                  It's mostly post-period material, but has one great pre-1600 piece. I
                  find that post-1650 bawdy stuff is very different from pre-1600 bawdy
                  stuff, and this CD really shows that well.

                  "Watkins Ale" is almost all Elizabethan. Great stuff. Here's the
                  contents:

                  http://www.freedb.org/freedb_search_fmt.php?cat=classical&id=1f0fda14

                  -- Gregory
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