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Re: Introductions

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  • wodeford
    ... Not at all - you ve added a lot more detail. ;- Jehanne
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 1, 2005
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      --- In SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com, "Tim Jennings" <tim@r...> wrote:
      > To Jehanne - Not to dispute your definition too much, but..

      Not at all - you've added a lot more detail. ;->

      Jehanne
    • Bill
      Thank you all for your great information and insight. I will be writing you individually as well if that is ok. I think what I d most like to do as a bard is
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
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        Thank you all for your great information and insight.
        I will be writing you individually as well if that is
        ok.

        I think what I'd most like to do as a bard is (a)
        read/recite some of my own poems/tales and (b) play
        one or more period instruments.

        Now I just need to find/learn instruments. :-)

        I look forward to further discussions on the list.

        Thanks again!

        Bill "no persona yet" Savage
      • L C Harmon Horner
        My persona name is Alais de Saint German en Leye, a woman of the 1400 s or so. TIme-wise I m flexible. Always was. I, too am a returnee to SCA. Back in
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 2, 2005
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          My persona name is Alais de Saint German en Leye, a woman of the 1400's or so. TIme-wise I'm flexible. Always was. I, too am a "returnee" to SCA. Back in college, I Sca'd in the SHire located in Athens, Ohio (Dearnehelde <sp>) wher I had an Irish persona with the same time problem. In other places I am also known by "ashie". Little "a".
          I have always had an interest in the creative end of things and while I have rarely performed my own work (twice since 1978) I have done the usual gamut of choir (can't sing, though) and community theater (more act up than act). I have written in several media types- from radio script to full length drama- essays, poems, short stories.
          I prefer working in the syllabic form of poetry rather than the rhymed, myself.
          I am interested in moving more into story-telling, and hope to get more into that as time becomes more available. So far, my husband and I have not been able to be active, but we are patient people. We brew. We have to be.
          I look forward to networking, especially as in 2 1/2 years I have not been able to catch the librairy here open and that rather limits researching via books. Though the web site of True Thomas has a trove of resources. (search True Thomas storyteller to find him. Very nice and helpful gentleman and he is very supportive of the storyteller artforms of all eras and cultures. Good instructor RL to boot.)
           
          Cheers and better times in the coming year-
           
          Alais de St G (for short)

          Bill <auberon2k@...> wrote:
          Hello!

          My name is Bill.



          Faugh a Ballagh!


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        • KaziBrionSCA
          Greetings from Brion Enkazi of the Debatable Lands in Aethelmearc (Pittsburgh, PA): I also focus on storytelling as my primary art. Did you know that there is
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 3, 2005
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            Greetings from Brion Enkazi of the Debatable Lands in Aethelmearc (Pittsburgh, PA):
             
            I also focus on storytelling as my primary art.  Did you know that there is an extensive group of mundane storytellers in the area?  We also do a fair amount of bardic stuff here in the BMDL (Pittsburgh) area if you feel, both storytelling-wise, poetically, and with those people who play . . . whatchamacallit . . . instruments.  Oh yeah.
             
            Please feel free to call on me or us for any support we could give.
             

            Brion Enkazi, m/k/a Scott Pavelle
            Barony Marche Debatable Lands, m/k/a Pittsburgh, PA
            www.PavelleLaw.com

            P.S.  You can find some storytelling materials at my website too.  Let me know if they help.
            -----Original Message-----
            From: L C Harmon Horner [mailto:asilnomrah@...]
            Sent: Monday, January 03, 2005 2:38 AM
            To: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [SCA_BARDS] Introductions

            My persona name is Alais de Saint German en Leye, a woman of the 1400's or so. TIme-wise I'm flexible. Always was. I, too am a "returnee" to SCA. Back in college, I Sca'd in the SHire located in Athens, Ohio (Dearnehelde <sp>) wher I had an Irish persona with the same time problem. In other places I am also known by "ashie". Little "a".
            I have always had an interest in the creative end of things and while I have rarely performed my own work (twice since 1978) I have done the usual gamut of choir (can't sing, though) and community theater (more act up than act). I have written in several media types- from radio script to full length drama- essays, poems, short stories.
            I prefer working in the syllabic form of poetry rather than the rhymed, myself.
            I am interested in moving more into story-telling, and hope to get more into that as time becomes more available. So far, my husband and I have not been able to be active, but we are patient people. We brew. We have to be.
            I look forward to networking, especially as in 2 1/2 years I have not been able to catch the librairy here open and that rather limits researching via books. Though the web site of True Thomas has a trove of resources. (search True Thomas storyteller to find him. Very nice and helpful gentleman and he is very supportive of the storyteller artforms of all eras and cultures. Good instructor RL to boot.)
             
            Cheers and better times in the coming year-
             
            Alais de St G (for short)

            Bill <auberon2k@...> wrote:
            Hello!

            My name is Bill.



            Faugh a Ballagh!


            Do you Yahoo!?
            Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more.

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          • Guernen Cimarguid
            Hi Garraed- just to pick a few nits on the Welsh side of things ;-) ... brehon ... in ... form the ... I m not sure about the completely separate part -
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 3, 2005
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              Hi Garraed-

              just to pick a few nits on the Welsh side of things ;-)


              > The word 'bard' is from the medieval (and earlier) gaelic and the
              brehon
              > law system in Ireland and the western side of Scotland places them
              in
              > history as part of the Celtic caste system, completely separate
              form the
              > Welsh system.

              I'm not sure about the "completely separate" part - there does seem
              to have been some interchange between the two traditions, especially
              in the 12th century. Not as much surviving documentation in Welsh as
              there is for the Irish tradition, so it's hard to be sure.

              >
              > Bardagh (plural or bard, or baird in modern gaelic) of this area
              were
              > divided into three ranks - Bardagh, Filidh and Olagh (also spelled
              > Ollagh/Ollave/Ollamh) (or people who had some training - but were
              only
              > amateurs, the professionals and the masters)

              There may (or may not) have been a three-part division in the Welsh
              tradition as well - cantorion, beirdd teulu and penkeirdd are
              mentioned in the Welsh laws. Scholarly articles are available to
              support both points of view ;-)

              >
              > The bardd of Wales (pronounced bert-th, with a roll across the hard
              t -
              > The plural is Beirdd, pronounced the same way with a hard a sound)

              [Sorry, not pronounced the same. Bardd = approx. bahrth, "ah" sound
              for the vowel. ]

              are
              > certainly also able to use the title, but as you note the
              pronounciation
              > is different. Their masters were referred to as Pencerdd (Pen-kirth)
              >
              > Both derive from the earlier Celtic word bardos (pl. - Bardoi),
              though
              > that may very well be a latinized perversion from classical sources.
              > There is good information that in earlier period, the professional
              > bardagh were part of the druidic castes in both areas, with some of
              > their duties including being a kind of moral compass through
              > storytelling, satire and praise poetry for their people.
              >

              Little or no information about the druidic castes in Welsh, but I
              tend to agree with you. Certainly there are ample traditions of the
              poet-as-magician, especially the Taliesin material ;-)

              Guernen Cimarguid
              Outlands
            • Tim Jennings
              Hiya Guernin, Sorry - what I meant by completely separate from the Welsh system is that the caste system and laws of Wales and the Brehon tradition of Ireland
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 6, 2005
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                Hiya Guernin,

                Sorry - what I meant by completely separate from the Welsh system is
                that the caste system and laws of Wales and the Brehon tradition of
                Ireland and west Scotland are very different in the details.

                This seems to extend to the roles and requirements on the bardagh

                I agree that by the 12th century and later there would definitely be a
                lot of cross culture. That said, except in Wales, the bard as a
                profession, was dying out in other places by then (with the end of the
                Brehon system and the Celtic church). The term was used after that by
                lots of people, but almost always as a synonym for 'poet', and not in
                the original context (although Scotland, it seems, picks it up briefly
                again in the 14-15th century, where they are promptly banned by the
                English Crown;)

                Cool about the 3 part system in Wales. I was unaware of that. Can you
                send me your source on that? I would love to read it.

                Re: Taliesin - yeah. It's the Ammairgen (Amorgen/Amergin) stuff that
                firmly does that for Ireland.

                TTFN
                Tim/Garraed


                Tim Jennings, Managing Director
                Roseneath Theatre
                +1 519 787 2399
                www.roseneath.ca


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Guernen Cimarguid [mailto:gwernin@...]
                Sent: January 3, 2005 1:23 PM
                To: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [SCA_BARDS] historical bards, was Re: Introductions


                Hi Garraed-

                just to pick a few nits on the Welsh side of things ;-)

                (LOTS of snipping below - garraed)

                > The word 'bard' is from the medieval (and earlier) gaelic and the
                brehon law system in Ireland and the western side of Scotland places
                them
                in history as part of the Celtic caste system, completely separate
                from the Welsh system.

                I'm not sure about the "completely separate" part - there does seem
                to have been some interchange between the two traditions, especially
                in the 12th century. Not as much surviving documentation in Welsh as
                there is for the Irish tradition, so it's hard to be sure.

                There may (or may not) have been a three-part division in the Welsh
                tradition as well - cantorion, beirdd teulu and penkeirdd are
                mentioned in the Welsh laws. Scholarly articles are available to
                support both points of view ;-)

                Little or no information about the druidic castes in Welsh, but I
                tend to agree with you. Certainly there are ample traditions of the
                poet-as-magician, especially the Taliesin material ;-)

                Guernen Cimarguid
                Outlands
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