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What ever happened to Christian mythology?

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  • Julie
    Greetings to the list, A thought has been nagging at the back of my mind lately, and I thought I d share it and ask for input. When I was at Pennsic this year,
    Message 1 of 66 , Nov 8, 2004
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      Greetings to the list,

      A thought has been nagging at the back of my mind lately, and I thought I'd
      share it and ask for input.

      When I was at Pennsic this year, and indeed at other, smaller events, I
      notice a trend in the bardic stories and songs. When these pieces are not
      about sca-related events, they generally fall into the categories of Norse
      or Arabic mythology. At Pennsic, the majority of pieces are hear were
      Norse, Arabic / Muslim, and a few Indian or Celtic pieces. Obviously, I
      commend those performers who have taken the time to research their persona's
      culture and bring that knowledge to their audience.

      My question is, what happened to Christian mythology? Given that the focus
      of the SCA is theoretically the high middle ages in western europe,
      shouldn't there be an abundance of bible stories, saints' lives, and
      Catholic superstititon around our fires? I know very little about medieval
      Catholic culture (though I'm attempting to learn more), but it seems to me
      that they have a mythology every bit as rich as the Norse or the Celts.

      Has it also been your experience that Christian tales are under-represented
      in our society? If so, why do you think this is, and what can we do to help
      correct it? Do you know of any good sources for Christian tales?

      Katherine Ashewode

      The SCA Without Breaking the Bank
      http://www.geocities.com/yourstruly/sca.html
    • L C Harmon Horner
      What a shame! There are and were many cultures during the Christian expansion which mixed both the Christian and Non-Christian symbology and mythology. In
      Message 66 of 66 , Jan 1, 2005
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        What a shame! There are and were many cultures during the "Christian expansion" which mixed both the Christian and Non-Christian symbology and mythology. In fact, in at least the Irish, the Christian traditions which have come down the ages have helped to illustrate the little that it known about the pre-Christian culture. And the wonderful processions of the Italians, the Mexicans also have their roots in pre-Christian times. ANd the Unicorn tapestries housed in the Cloisters are replete with both pagan and Christian symbology- and many times it is the same symbol with similar meanings!
         
        I have an idea to intertwine Lykewake Dirge and Wayfaring Stranger and when I asked for help from a non- SCA musician who is also pagan, I got a rather angry response. I personally have mixed pagan and Christian symbology in short stories, including one about Christmas and both sides of Charon's coin (so to speak) responded equally- each seeing that of the tradition they believe.
         
        I read the words to the song mentioned below- such a lovely translation! The only comment I would have for anyone who took offense would be to point out that roses are also the symbolic flower of various goddesses, and for some Christian doctrine both modern and ancient, Mary is assigned the place of such similarly, and is also connected to the Trinity in the concept of Sophia- aka "the holy spirit/ghost". But then, I think knowledge is the key to tolerance. Literature, song, poetry- these are the bridges.
         
        Alais de Saint Germain en Laye


        >> Truth be told, I think the whole thing is a crying shame.
        >> There are songs and stories told in SCA (and in period) that
        >> are so filthy/scatalogical/offensive that I am embarrassed to
        >> hear them in mixed company (and I'm not a prude; I have been
        >> guilty of some pretty suggestive stuff myself).  Nobody
        >> blinks at that.  But I can't sing "Es ist ein Ros
        >> Entsprungen" without fear of the backlash.
        >>



        Faugh a Ballagh!


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