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Performing in Other Languages

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  • Finnabhair
    Greetings All, This is something we re discussing on another list, for the Lochac Guild. How do people go about performing in other languages to an audience
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 6, 2001
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      Greetings All,
      This is something we're discussing on another list, for the Lochac
      Guild. How do people go about performing in other languages to an
      audience that are (largely) English Speaking? How do you keep your
      audiences? What about translations? How do you maintain the emotion
      or power for a performance given in another language? Does anyone
      have any tips?

      Finnabhair
    • Shivaun McGoff
      ... M lord, On Master Efenwealt Wystle s CD there is a French song in which he does a verse in French and then he sings a translated version. I think that
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 6, 2001
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        Finnabhair wrote:

        > How do people go about performing in other languages to an audience that
        > are (largely) English Speaking? How do you keep your audiences? What about
        > translations? How do you maintain the emotion or power for a performance
        > given in another language? Does anyone have any tips?

        M'lord,

        On Master Efenwealt Wystle's CD there is a French song in which he does a
        verse in French and then he sings a translated version. I think that helps
        me as a listener enjoy the sound of the French and the "periodness" of the
        song, then the meaning is made clear. I would have to say that music
        translates emotion in whichever language you sing it, it's all in the
        presentation. The translated version may be read before or after you perform
        to complete the picture, or not at all, because if you've got the audience in
        the palm of your hand sometimes there just isn't the need. Make sure you
        know the translation of what you are singing because if you don't know, your
        voice won't enlighten your listeners either.

        I have a terrible time becoming vulnerable enough to let people see how music
        affects me, but I have learned through observing a few brilliant performers
        that it's essential to do your best to open up if you're searching for that
        golden moment when you know everyone is lost in the music YOU are making and
        the connection between you and your listeners and the music is strongest. Be
        crazy, or silly, or sad, or whatever, and don't worry about what other people
        will think of you. If you can figure out a way that I can take my own
        advice, please let me know. ;)

        -S.
      • Finnabhair
        Thankyou... and that s M Lady, not M Lord :) Finnabhair
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 6, 2001
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          Thankyou... and that's M'Lady, not M'Lord :)

          Finnabhair
        • wodeford@yahoo.com
          ... I like your style, Siobhan! If you do your job correctly, the beauty of the music should get it across. However, a lot of very early pieces have tunes that
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 7, 2001
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            --- In SCA_BARDS@y..., Shivaun McGoff <ladysiobhan@h...> wrote:
            > I would have to say that music translates emotion in whichever
            > language you sing it, it's all in the presentation. The translated
            > version may be read before or after you perform to complete the
            > picture, or not at all, because if you've got the audience in
            > the palm of your hand sometimes there just isn't the need. Make
            > sure you know the translation of what you are singing because if
            > you don't know, your voice won't enlighten your listeners either.
            I like your style, Siobhan! If you do your job correctly, the beauty
            of the music should get it across. However, a lot of very early
            pieces have tunes that don't necessarily convey what they're
            about: "Novus Miles Sequitur" is about the violent murder of St.
            Thomas A Becket and the music is very cheerful. If you can't come up
            with a decent translation or transliteration that is singable, don't
            be afraid to introduce your piece by telling the story. (Eg.: King
            Richard the Lionheart was returning from his holy Crusade when, lo,
            the evil Leopold of Austria captured him and demanded a hefty ransom.
            Richard lamented his confinement and prayed his friends might ransom
            him before winter passed....)

            > I have a terrible time becoming vulnerable enough to let people see
            > how music affects me, but I have learned through observing a few
            > brilliant performers that it's essential to do your best to open up
            > if you're searching for that golden moment when you know everyone
            > is lost in the music YOU are making and the connection between you
            > and your listeners and the music is strongest. Be crazy, or silly,
            > or sad, or whatever, and don't worry about what other people
            > will think of you. If you can figure out a way that I can take my
            > own advice, please let me know. ;)
            That's the BEST! I think you have to be able to lose yourself in the
            music before anyone else will be. When that happens, you're not
            worried about what your audience thinks, you're in the zone where
            you're making a beautiful sound and that's all that matters. At
            least, that's what works for me: I've been lucky enough to have it
            happen a couple of times and it's the best feeling in the world.

            Jehanne de Wodeford, Rusted Woodlands (EAST)
          • Cary J Lenehan
            Actually our problem is not with songs. A beautiful song is a beautiful song and the words are immaterial (thus the success of opera). Our problem in Lochac
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 11, 2001
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              Actually our problem is not with songs. A beautiful song is a
              beautiful song and the words are immaterial (thus the success of
              opera). Our problem in Lochac lies with poetry, which has much less
              scope.

              Hrolf
            • Susanna Rodriguez
              ... The current Bard of Cynagua did a piece (which I personally think won the competition for her) that was a poem in Latin and English. Her expression and
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 11, 2001
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                --- Cary J Lenehan <baron_hrolf@...> wrote:
                > Actually our problem is not with songs. A beautiful song is a
                > beautiful song and the words are immaterial (thus the success of
                > opera). Our problem in Lochac lies with poetry, which has much less
                > scope.
                >
                > Hrolf
                >
                >

                The current Bard of Cynagua did a piece (which I personally think won
                the competition for her) that was a poem in Latin and English. Her
                expression and body language was so amazing that those of us who do not
                speak Latin were able to tell some of what she was saying *before* she
                translated it. Truly incredible performance.

                Elsa


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