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Looking for Story Telling Pointers

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  • jgyoung612@aol.com
    Since I am new to this, it is about time to make the traditional please help the newbie plea. I m looking for tips in both formal and informal settings, if
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 4, 2001
      Since I am new to this, it is about time to make the traditional "please help
      the newbie" plea. I'm looking for tips in both formal and informal settings,
      if there is a distinction between the two. I'm sure a lot of it does depend
      on personality, but if there is any standardized pointers, please send them
      my way

      Note-takingly
      James
    • Lillyth
      Well, as for my experience with storytelling of any kind, formal or informal, timing is of the essence. I have certain stories I tell that over the years I ve
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 4, 2001
        Well, as for my experience with storytelling of any kind, formal or
        informal, timing is of the essence. I have certain stories I tell that over
        the years I've perfected timing and nuance on, and as a result, they're much
        the better for it. All I can suggest for getting it right, is writing it
        down, practicing, and if it doesn't have the right effect, redo it.

        Also, know you're audience for the story you are telling. It makes no sense
        to tell an armoring/fighting story to a group of dancers unless they fight
        as well or are familiar enough to understand. Aka: Don't geek out the
        audience. A mundane example is that I have stories that are geology related
        and are quite funny for people who understand geology. Trying to tell them
        to a comp-sci person on the other hand goes over about as well as an
        elephant in a China shop.

        Animation in storytelling can be helpful, meaning animate yourself if
        possible...

        If you've had any experience in the theater, use it. Otherwise, watch some
        and see how they use their bodies to convey things.

        Good luck!

        -------
        Saviya the Silent
        College of St. Golias
        Kingdom of the Outlands

        -----Original Message-----
        From: jgyoung612@... [mailto:jgyoung612@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2001 10:06 PM
        To: SCA_BARDS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA_BARDS] Looking for Story Telling Pointers


        Since I am new to this, it is about time to make the traditional "please
        help
        the newbie" plea. I'm looking for tips in both formal and informal settings,
        if there is a distinction between the two. I'm sure a lot of it does depend
        on personality, but if there is any standardized pointers, please send them
        my way

        Note-takingly
        James

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      • Glenn Gass
        I don t sing but I think I can tell a mean story. The formal story time would be at court, in A&S and anywhere that has a formal setting, Feast, even some
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 5, 2001
          I don't sing but I think I can tell a mean story.


          The formal story time would be at court, in A&S and anywhere that has a
          formal setting, Feast, even some bardic circles. These will normally have
          one person in charge so it kind of gives it away that it's formal.

          The informal is the relaxed everyone gather by the fire, and have fun. No
          ones in charge and everyone takes turns. Don't be Rhino Bard!

          As to telling stories, there are a few rules for you:


          Perform short not to flowery pieces. Time after time I've had people get up
          and leave or start talking in long, overly discriptive pieces.

          Humorous pieces can be longer then sad pieces.
          longer pieces with a chorus work well as it gets the audience involved.
          2-4 minutes is a long time to listen when your drunk.
          2 or more plot twists is confusing if your drink.
          Long names get foregotten
          if there isn't a lot of alteration(sp?) don't spend time learnig it word for
          word
          have lots of good friends that will not roll their eyes up into the back of
          their head when you use them to practice on.


          Greggor of VR
        • Maggie Rose
          ... OK, the best distinction I can give you right now between formal and informal bardic is when are you doing it? Most formal bardic is during the day, for
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 5, 2001
            > Since I am new to this, it is about time to make the traditional "please help
            > the newbie" plea. I'm looking for tips in both formal and informal settings,
            > if there is a distinction between the two. I'm sure a lot of it does depend
            > on personality, but if there is any standardized pointers, please send them
            > my way
            >
            > Note-takingly
            > James

            OK, the best distinction I can give you right now between formal and informal
            bardic is when are you doing it? Most "formal" bardic is during the day, for a
            competition, and most "informal" is at night, around the campfire. For Formal,
            don't use notes, if you can help it. Do something more historically accurate,
            and bring documentation just in case. For Informal, bring your songbook, your
            poetry book, whatever. This is the time for filk, for bawdy, for the silly
            stuff. And if it's about someone that most everybody knows, so much the better.
            But be prepared to run, just in case.


            --
            "Never let the truth get in the way of a good story." - George Burns


            Lady Margaret Rose O'Malley
            Rose WinterFlame
            "Mommy!"
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