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  • Mann
    I have a question. My main period of interest is 14th-16th century (French, English, German). Now I am wanting to start making hats to go with the rest of my
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 8, 2000
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      I have a question. My main period of interest is 14th-16th century (French,
      English, German). Now I am
      wanting to start making hats to go with the rest of my garb. Before I have
      bought them.
      Where do I start?
      What are good books to obtain?
      Materials?
      Thanks for any help
      Philippa Graves
    • Leah Lloyd
      ... I always suggest that people go to The Bible - Millia Davenports Book Of Costume , Crown Publishers. This is always one of the first places I go for
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 8, 2000
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        On Sun, 8 Oct 2000 10:34:30 -0400 "Mann" <saffron@...> writes:
        > I have a question. My main period of interest is 14th-16th century
        > (French, English, German). Now I am
        > wanting to start making hats to go with the rest of my garb. Before
        > I have bought them.
        > Where do I start?
        > What are good books to obtain?
        > Materials?
        > Thanks for any help
        > Philippa Graves

        I always suggest that people go to The Bible - Millia Davenports "Book
        Of Costume", Crown Publishers. This is always one of the first places I
        go for reference - it's compact, and tidily in chronological &
        geographical order. After I find something I like in Davenport (in fuzzy
        b&w) I go look for a finer copy in a color book.

        Any book published by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Victoria & Albert,
        or British Museum is also usually an excellent investment. I try and look
        for books that don't have too much overlap, unless the quality of prints
        in the newer book is obviously better than the one already in my
        collection. Avoid Peacock and any other "costume" or "fashion history"
        which is strictly tertiary documentation (someone else's interpretive
        line drawings) - those are fine when you're beginning, but it's always
        better to use secondary documentation (a print of the original) whenever
        possible. Also, straight copies of manuscripts are wealths of
        information. For that matter, go talk to your local calligrapher or
        Mistress of Arts & Sciences - they tend to have masses of manuscript
        books, borrowing which (remember to return it!!!) will save you a lot of
        money in the outset.

        Check out the Art Section of dusty bookstores, and the clearance sections
        of large book chains - they often have museum series or art series in
        there, and you can find interesting things for not very much.

        Danabren
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      • kcncress@aol.com
        I have a particularly informative entry level book that has nothing to do with Medieval portraiture/art, but i still reach for it when I need help with a
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 10, 2000
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          I have a particularly informative entry level book that has nothing to do
          with Medieval portraiture/art, but i still reach for it when I need help with
          a certain procedure. It is From the Neck Up: An Illustrated Guide to
          Hatmaking, by Denise Dreher ISBN 0-941082-00-8. It is a very comprehesive
          instruction manual with a good glossary, patterns (which I take with a grain
          of salt), and resources (which may now be obsolete as it was published in
          1981).

          It has chapters on stitches and techniques, foundation construction, trim,
          working with felt, and straw. It appears to be geared to the theatrical
          costumer, but is a helpful reference for the serious miliner who wishes to
          know the terms, and modern procedures. There are very few period references
          to hatmaking!

          Has anyone come across specific articles on how hats were made in period?

          Dejaniera
          Calontir
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