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Re: [SCA-Milliners] MOL text/Making Medieval Hats

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  • EHW
    On 2 Oct 2000, at 23:06, Leah Lloyd wrote: d ... I really WANT this book... anyone have a copy for sale or know where I can get one? ... I don t know you guys
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 3, 2000
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      On 2 Oct 2000, at 23:06, Leah Lloyd wrote:
      d
      > > Museum of London _Dress Accessories_

      I really WANT this book... anyone have a copy for sale or know
      where I can get one?
      >
      > *Phew*! It's 11pm and I'm going to bed now. Is there anyone else who
      > has any opinions or suggestions on this subject besides we three
      > Easterners? Danabren

      I don't know you guys are doing amazing things online. The force
      is with you... or is it Q? Moonraker not withstanding ... wow I am
      keeping all these posts.
    • Cynthia Virtue
      ... Yeah, I could see that. But there s already a layer of silk on the wire, so the loops are another layer. ... Okey, maybe my problem is a terminology one.
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 3, 2000
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        Leah Lloyd wrote:
        > > the veil was sewn, presumably along the whole length; which would be
        > > odd, because if this is the true shape, you'd get almost a tube of
        > > veiling attached to a double bracelet of wire effect.
        >
        > My thought is that instead of having buckram and wire screening ;) and
        > such to make their headdreses out of, adding on the knowledge that they
        > (or the makers) had much more free time available to do such intensive
        > handwork, that the spiral thread loops are there to sew the fabric cover
        > *on* to, as an anchor.

        Yeah, I could see that. But there's already a layer of silk on the wire,
        so the loops are another layer.

        > > Danabren, could you describe the ram's horn use of wire like this?
        > > I'm short in the imagining department tonight, and you're much more
        > > familiar with the style than I am.
        >
        > Again, turn it 180 degrees. The hooks would be underneath, if for no
        > other reason that looped metal would create a lump, and who wants that?
        > One end of the spiral is placed against an ear. The entire frame is
        > covered in fabric, basically becoming a short tube, open on one flat end
        > (ear). Depending upon the size of the wearer, and the extremity of
        > fashion at the time, the caul is either demure, just enough to cover the
        > hair and ear, or larger, the start of the grander styles which eventually
        > evolved into the grandiose heart-shaped hennins of the 15th C

        Okey, maybe my problem is a terminology one. I think of "ram's horn"
        headress as the ponytails wrapped with fabric and then coiled into flat
        Danish Pastry arrangements on each side of the head. I think I'd call
        what you describe here as simply "horn shaped" since there isn't any
        visible spiraling of the hair. Or, if it was the flatter lumps (a la
        the princess in Braveheart) I don't have a good name for that style --
        every book has their own term, it seems.

        At any rate, now that you've explained, I feel very happy, as it's
        another possible bit of info in the "sometimes what we see in the horns
        is the surface of fabric, with possible fake hair or other support
        behind it" theory. A theory that I'm fond of, but one never knows.

        --
        Cynthia du Pré Argent
        "Such virtue hath my pen...." -Shakespeare, Sonnet LXXXI
        "I knew this wasn't _my_ pen!" --Cynthia V.
      • Leah Lloyd
        ... I usually refer to those as Princess Leia Buns , if they are flat and round. Ram s Horns when they are small cauls, anywhere in size from baby s fists
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 3, 2000
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          > Okey, maybe my problem is a terminology one. I think of "ram's horn"
          > headress as the ponytails wrapped with fabric and then coiled into
          > flat Danish Pastry arrangements on each side of the head.

          I usually refer to those as "Princess Leia Buns", if they are flat and
          round. "Ram's Horns" when they are small cauls, anywhere in size from
          baby's fists to canteloupes. "Moose Ears" when the cauls are at their
          horizontal size apex. "Puppy Ears" when the hair is braided from above
          the temple, dropping down to jaw level and then folding back up (usually
          worn with cotehardies). "Coin Holders" or "Airplane Streeling Wheel"
          (courtesy of friends) when vertical tubular cauls are worn around the
          puppy ears. Any basic knob shape made up exclusively of hair is also a
          "horn", but much less amusing for both the wearer and their friends :)

          I think I'd call
          > what you describe here as simply "horn shaped" since there isn't any
          > visible spiraling of the hair. Or, if it was the flatter lumps (a la
          > the princess in Braveheart)

          ARRRRRRGH!!!!! (sorry, personal candy-coloured button)

          I don't have a good name for that style
          > -- every book has their own term, it seems.

          And every milliner! :)

          Danabren
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