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Greetings, New member seeking advice about wigmaking

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  • Seonaid13
    Hello! I m Sfandra Dmitrieva Chernigova. I live in the Barony of Carolingia, of the East Kingdom, but usually can be found in Barony of the Bridge (RI)
    Message 1 of 9 , May 30, 2008
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      Hello!
      I'm Sfandra Dmitrieva Chernigova. I live in the Barony of
      Carolingia, of the East Kingdom, but usually can be found in Barony
      of the Bridge (RI) playing with other members of Haus
      VonDrakenklaue. I specialize in Kievan Rus' costuming: everything
      from underwear to headwear and accessories. I'm known for my Big
      Hats - foot tall Novgorod kokoshniki, large fan kokoshnicki, even my
      first baronial coronet (made by my mistress, Irene LeNoir) was
      BIG..... My attitude towards costuming is "Start with 'Head, and
      shoulders, knees and toes...'" Hats, garments, and shoes....

      Right now, inspired by a christmas gift, I'm working on a project
      that's definitely PRE period: an 19th Dynasty Egyptian outfit, for
      a "night out" outfit for Pennsic. Egyptology is my other passion,
      after Kievan Russia.

      I'm hoping to get a little advice from members here. I'm planning on
      making a WIG. Since the proper contemporary method of making wigs is
      way out of my reach, in time and technique, I've started by making a
      muslin coif with ties at the base of my skull, so that it holds very
      snugly. Now I'm preparing to build up the "hair", intending to sew
      the braids to the coif.

      http://gallery.villagehatshop.com/gallery/view_photo.php?
      set_albumName=chapter1&id=6_G The sketch in the bottom right corner
      is my basis. I'll probably also make the circlet shown right above
      it.

      I have a couple of packages of fake hair, kanekalon. I'm finding it
      incredibly difficult to work with, particularly in the longer braid
      lengths i'm going to need. In addition, how does one 'end' a braid?
      I've tried heat - it creates a nasty plastic hunk of ugliness...
      I've seen nail glue recommended; has anyone here tried that?

      In addition, I'm wondering if saving my sanity and just using black
      wool yarn would be passable? There's some evidence that cheaper wigs
      in ancient egypt were made from dyed wool or horsehair. My concern
      is.. would I end up looking like Raggety Ann Goes To Egypt?!? ;)

      Does anyone have suggestions for working with kanekelon hair?

      Many thanks,
      Sfandra Dmitrieva
    • Cynthia Virtue
      One option for the braid ends is to sew them up with thread and a needle. You can trim the braid closely to this afterwards; it probably will look fairly
      Message 2 of 9 , May 30, 2008
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        One option for the braid ends is to "sew" them up with thread and a
        needle. You can trim the braid closely to this afterwards; it probably
        will look fairly neat.
      • unclrashid
        ... on ... is ... a ... very ... corner ... it ... I ve worked with this stuff. What exactly is the difficulty you are having? ... Tying them with black
        Message 3 of 9 , May 30, 2008
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          --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "Seonaid13" <seonaid13@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Right now, inspired by a christmas gift, I'm working on a project
          > that's definitely PRE period: an 19th Dynasty Egyptian outfit, for
          > a "night out" outfit for Pennsic. Egyptology is my other passion,
          > after Kievan Russia.
          >
          > I'm hoping to get a little advice from members here. I'm planning
          on
          > making a WIG. Since the proper contemporary method of making wigs
          is
          > way out of my reach, in time and technique, I've started by making
          a
          > muslin coif with ties at the base of my skull, so that it holds
          very
          > snugly. Now I'm preparing to build up the "hair", intending to sew
          > the braids to the coif.
          >
          > http://gallery.villagehatshop.com/gallery/view_photo.php?
          > set_albumName=chapter1&id=6_G The sketch in the bottom right
          corner
          > is my basis. I'll probably also make the circlet shown right above
          > it.
          >
          > I have a couple of packages of fake hair, kanekalon. I'm finding
          it
          > incredibly difficult to work with, particularly in the longer braid
          > lengths i'm going to need.

          I've worked with this stuff. What exactly is the difficulty you are
          having?

          > In addition, how does one 'end' a braid?

          Tying them with black thread is probably the best idea. But you can
          also get teensy black rubberbands that would be faster than tying.
          Nail polish might work... you'd have to cut the end of braid flush
          or flat and use two rubberbands to hold it while it dried.

          > In addition, I'm wondering if saving my sanity and just using black
          > wool yarn would be passable? There's some evidence that cheaper
          wigs
          > in ancient egypt were made from dyed wool or horsehair. My concern
          > is.. would I end up looking like Raggety Ann Goes To Egypt?!?

          That's going to be somewhat in the "eye of the beholder". Also
          partially a function of the size and texture of yarn you use. If you
          can get an affordable source of the kind of wool used for crewel
          embroidery, that would probably look pretty good.

          > Does anyone have suggestions for working with kanekelon hair?

          Again, I need to know what the problem is you are having. Have you
          considered purchasing kanekelon mini-braids? would save you much
          time and work, and though I have never used them, I suspect they tend
          NOT to unravel.

          Another possibility is plying the kanekalon like rope. There is a
          way to twist and ply real hair that goes quite quickly (I used to set
          my daughter's hair that way for the SCA if I didn't have time to do
          tiny braids), it would also work with fake hair if you have some way
          of anchoring it at the midpoint.

          Kanekalon can be heat set, but you have to let if cool completely
          before you uncurl it. If you want to straighten it out, use a fat
          curling iron on low setting (test it first) and just pull thin
          sections of it through the iron. Curling it is harder because you
          have to leave it on the iron until it cools. It might be possible to
          put it on curlers (or in braids) and boil them like you do to set
          plied yarn.

          And lastly, I would never be able to work with kanekalon without my
          hackle. You take a 24 inch section of lath or thin lumber and pound
          40 or 50 1.5 inch finishing nails through it arranged like you are
          making a giant hairbrush out of nails (pointy side up). Then you
          just clamp it to a sturdy surface and you can flail the hank of hair
          through it and rip the hell out of any tangles. It's also used for
          blending different colors together, but you won't need to do that for
          an Egyptian wig.

          Rashid
          PS
          if none of these ideas deal with your problem, give me a more
          specific idea what its doing wrong.
        • Seonaid13
          ... Mainly that it seems to snarl up all by itself, regardless of how many times i ve just combed it, or if I use a damp comb or not. Plus.. the stuff seems to
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 2, 2008
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            > I've worked with this stuff. What exactly is the difficulty you
            >are having?

            Mainly that it seems to snarl up all by itself, regardless of how
            many times i've just combed it, or if I use a damp comb or not.
            Plus.. the stuff seems to just disperse by itself and end up
            EVERYWHERE. It has a mind of its own.

            > Again, I need to know what the problem is you are having. Have you
            > considered purchasing kanekelon mini-braids? would save you much
            > time and work, and though I have never used them, I suspect they
            >tend NOT to unravel.

            THANK YOU! I didn't even know that you could buy PRE-braided hair!
            I'm going to have to make a trip to a beauty supply place soon.

            > And lastly, I would never be able to work with kanekalon without my
            > hackle.

            I don't really have the wherewithal to make or use one of these, but
            I DO have access to some never-used dog-grooming brushes, and I think
            one of them might do the trick. A slicker brush might work better
            than the plastic comb I've been using.

            Thanks for the tips,
            Sfandra
          • unclrashid
            ... Try cutting it to only a bit longer than the length needed before you start warking with it. The shorter it is, the less likely to snarl. You also need to
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 3, 2008
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              --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "Seonaid13" <seonaid13@...>
              wrote:
              >
              >
              > > I've worked with this stuff. What exactly is the difficulty you
              > >are having?
              >
              > Mainly that it seems to snarl up all by itself, regardless of how
              > many times i've just combed it, or if I use a damp comb or not.
              > Plus.. the stuff seems to just disperse by itself and end up
              > EVERYWHERE. It has a mind of its own.

              Try cutting it to only a bit longer than the length needed before you
              start warking with it. The shorter it is, the less likely to snarl.
              You also need to de-snarl it after every couple turns of the braid.

              You might try spraying water on it with a plant mister if you think
              static electricity is making it worse.


              > > And lastly, I would never be able to work with kanekalon without
              my
              > > hackle.
              >
              > I don't really have the wherewithal to make or use one of these,
              but
              > I DO have access to some never-used dog-grooming brushes, and I
              think
              > one of them might do the trick. A slicker brush might work better
              > than the plastic comb I've been using.
              >

              It's not like you need heavy equipment. You need a piece of wood, a
              box of finishing nails and a hammer.

              Good Luck.

              Rashid
            • borderlands15213
              ... I was wondering about two things, here: one, in addition to dampening the kanekalon hair with a plant mister/spritzing bottle is raising the humidity in
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 4, 2008
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                --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "unclrashid" <unclrashid@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "Seonaid13" <seonaid13@>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > > I've worked with this stuff. What exactly is the difficulty you
                > > >are having?
                > >
                > > Mainly that it seems to snarl up all by itself, regardless of how
                > > many times i've just combed it, or if I use a damp comb or not.
                > > Plus.. the stuff seems to just disperse by itself and end up
                > > EVERYWHERE. It has a mind of its own.
                >
                > Try cutting it to only a bit longer than the length needed before you
                > start warking with it. The shorter it is, the less likely to snarl.
                > You also need to de-snarl it after every couple turns of the braid.
                >
                > You might try spraying water on it with a plant mister if you think
                > static electricity is making it worse.
                >
                I was wondering about two things, here: one, in addition to dampening
                the kanekalon hair with a plant mister/spritzing bottle is raising the
                humidity in the immediate working area by means of one of those
                table-top misters or humidifiers that produces a cool or cold mist
                (works on some sonic principle, or something like that.) If you can,
                borrow this. Ideally, you'll find access to one that has controls for
                mist volume and mist density.
                The other is, assuming you're making what we called a "three-braid,"
                when we were kids--moving alternate outside portions of the material
                being braided over the center section--would it help to have wrapped
                each section in strips of muslin, much like bandaging a race-horse's
                legs, before you begin braiding? The muslin, being cotton, won't
                generate much static nor provide as much opportunity for the kanekalon
                to produce static against itself, and if you wrap from the bottom of
                the strand upward toward where you're going to begin working, you can
                unwrap a turn or so to expose the next inch or three of fake hair.
                Yes, this is tedious. When you wrap, you have to have enough overlap
                to keep the hair covered and manageable; and in the unwrapping, you
                have to keep the loose ends of the wrappings out of the way, somehow
                (safety-pin each back on its own wrapped-up area?) and you'd have to
                have some smaller strip of something like muslin, or some natural
                fiber cord (again, to avoid static) or some type of clamp to keep the
                braid from coming loose while you pause in the braiding to unwrapped
                another few inches of each of the three sections of hair.
                I'm one of those belt-and-suspender types, though, and I like to have
                my materials under control, so I'll accept tedious and even
                inconvenient, and slower, in order to achieve that end.

                >
                > > > And lastly, I would never be able to work with kanekalon without
                > my
                > > > hackle.
                > >
                > > I don't really have the wherewithal to make or use one of these,
                > but
                > > I DO have access to some never-used dog-grooming brushes, and I
                > think
                > > one of them might do the trick. A slicker brush might work better
                > > than the plastic comb I've been using.
                > >
                >
                > It's not like you need heavy equipment. You need a piece of wood, a
                > box of finishing nails and a hammer.

                True, Rashid, but that only takes care of the making of a hackle.
                Sfandra still needs a sturdy, solid surface to which to be able to
                clamp the hackle, and may not have one. First thought would be a
                table, but if her only table is great-grandmother's still-perfect,
                gleaming French-polished mahogany dining table brought back as a
                wedding present by great-uncle when he finished up working in British
                Malaya on a rubber plantation (adventuresome lad!), that'll be ruled
                out. A possibility would be the edge of the kitchen countertop,
                assuming there is one and that it's deep enough to provide a grip for
                the clamps. In my end-of-Arts-and-Crafts-Movement house, the top of
                the counter in the pantry is flush with the face of the cabinet below.
                (And the kitchen proper is very Victorian: just a box with a
                connection for a gas stove, and that connection was added *later.*)
                Sfandra, I'm assuming you don't keep a pair of C-clamps somewhere
                around your home and that your SO doesn't either. What about a
                friend? Who, perhaps, will also let you use (or whose dad or uncle
                will allow you to use) his workbench or work table? A friend of mine
                allowed me to replace the screening in my front and back screen doors,
                and, because we also had to replace the trim holding the screening in
                position, to stain the new wood to match the old---all on his custom
                built picnic tables, which he said he needs to refinish anyway. Very
                gallant of him, I thought.
                A pair of saw horses and a length of two-by-four, and two more
                C-clamps--larger ones?
                Just some thoughts, here.

                Yseult the Gentle
              • Wyndylyn
                For wrapping the hair while you braid, you can pull on some of that cotton tubing they use for under finger casts and splints. It s somewhat stretchy, comes in
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 4, 2008
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                  For wrapping the hair while you braid, you can pull on some of that cotton
                  tubing they use for under finger casts and splints. It's somewhat stretchy,
                  comes in various diameters and can be slowly slid off the hair as you have
                  braided a turn or two. If the hair is attached to a cap already, you can
                  fold the hair against a cord and use the cord to pull it through the tube.


                  Wyndylyn


                  > [Original Message]
                  > From: borderlands15213 <borderlands15213@...>
                  > To: <SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com>
                  > Date: 6/4/2008 6:09:57 AM
                  > Subject: [SCA-Milliners] Re: Greetings, New member seeking advice about
                  wigmaking
                  >
                  > --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "unclrashid" <unclrashid@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "Seonaid13" <seonaid13@>
                  > > wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > > I've worked with this
                  stuf�����,�A�H)���r'v��I�W��J�kP�w]uZK��]���2���I�I�����mq
                  > UXy\
                  > ��g8J�����\TG.������HOt
                  > ���M$�1�~Q�$��0"�E*��b
                  > > You also need to de-snarl it after every couple turns of the braid.
                  > >
                  > > You might try spraying water on it with a plant mister if you think
                  > > static electricity is making it worse.
                  > >
                  > I was wondering about two things, here: one, in addition to dampening
                  > the kanekalon hair with a plant mister/spritzing bottle is raising the
                  > humidity in the immediate working area by means of one of those
                  > table-top misters or humidifiers that produces a cool or cold mist
                  > (works on some sonic principle, or something like that.) If you can,
                  > borrow this. Ideally, you'll find access to one that has controls for
                  > mist volume and mist density.
                  > The other is, assuming you're making what we called a "three-braid,"
                  > when we were kids--moving alternate outside portions of the material
                  > being braided over the center section--would it help to have wrapped
                  > each section in strips of muslin, much like bandaging a race-horse's
                  > legs, before you begin braiding? The muslin, being cotton, won't
                  > generate much static nor provide as much opportunity for the kanekalon
                  > to produce static against itself, and if you wrap from the bottom of
                  > the strand upward toward where you're going to begin working, you can
                  > unwrap a turn or so to expose the next inch or three of fake hair.
                  > Yes, this is tedious. When you wrap, you have to have enough overlap
                  > to keep the hair covered and manageable; and in the unwrapping, you
                  > have to keep the loose ends of the wrappings out of the way, somehow
                  > (safety-pin each back on its own wrapped-up area?) and you'd have to
                  > have some smaller strip of something like muslin, or some natural
                  > fiber cord (again, to avoid static) or some type of clamp to keep the
                  > braid from coming loose while you pause in the braiding to unwrapped
                  > another few inches of each of the three sections of hair.
                  > I'm one of those belt-and-suspender types, though, and I like to have
                  > my materials under control, so I'll accept tedious and even
                  > inconvenient, and slower, in order to achieve that end.
                  >
                  > >
                  > > > > And lastly, I would never be able to work with kanekalon without
                  > > my
                  > > > > hackle.
                  > > >
                  > > > I don't really have the wherewithal to make or use one of these,
                  > > but
                  > > > I DO have access to some never-used dog-grooming brushes, and I
                  > > think
                  > > > one of them might do the trick. A slicker brush might work better
                  > > > than the plastic comb I've been using.
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > It's not like you need heavy equipment. You need a piece of wood, a
                  > > box of finishing nails and a hammer.
                  >
                  > True, Rashid, but that only takes care of the making of a hackle.
                  > Sfandra still needs a sturdy, solid surface to which to be able to
                  > clamp the hackle, and may not have one. First thought would be a
                  > table, but if her only table is great-grandmother's still-perfect,
                  > gleaming French-polished mahogany dining table brought back as a
                  > wedding present by great-uncle when he finished up working in British
                  > Malaya on a rubber plantation (adventuresome lad!), that'll be ruled
                  > out. A possibility would be the edge of the kitchen countertop,
                  > assuming there is one and that it's deep enough to provide a grip for
                  > the clamps. In my end-of-Arts-and-Crafts-Movement house, the top of
                  > the counter in the pantry is flush with the face of the cabinet below.
                  > (And the kitchen proper is very Victorian: just a box with a
                  > connection for a gas stove, and that connection was added *later.*)
                  > Sfandra, I'm assuming you don't keep a pair of C-clamps somewhere
                  > around your home and that your SO doesn't either. What about a
                  > friend? Who, perhaps, will also let you use (or whose dad or uncle
                  > will allow you to use) his workbench or work table? A friend of mine
                  > allowed me to replace the screening in my front and back screen doors,
                  > and, because we also had to replace the trim holding the screening in
                  > position, to stain the new wood to match the old---all on his custom
                  > built picnic tables, which he said he needs to refinish anyway. Very
                  > gallant of him, I thought.
                  > A pair of saw horses and a length of two-by-four, and two more
                  > C-clamps--larger ones?
                  > Just some thoughts, here.
                  >
                  > Yseult the Gentle
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Community email addresses:
                  > Post message: SCA-Milliners@onelist.com
                  > Subscribe: SCA-Milliners-subscribe@onelist.com
                  > Unsubscribe: SCA-Milliners-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                  > List owner: SCA-Milliners-owner@onelist.com
                  >
                  > Shortcut URL to this page:
                  > http://www.onelist.com/community/SCA-MillinersYahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Sfandra
                  ... stufÝãÌš,‘A€H)Ô׊r v§ÓI·WÒÉJºkPµw]uZKÉÞ]¦çÍ2¦ðII³δ ¢mqUXy ...
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 4, 2008
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                    > > > > I've worked with this
                    >
                    stufÝã̚,‘A€H)Ô׊r'v§ÓI·WÒÉJºkPµw]uZKÉÞ]¦çÍ2¦ðII³δ ¢mqUXy\
                    > ég8J•¢‰ÎŠ\TG.­óûöìÎHOt
                    > ӈ„M$…1‚~Q’$¤«0"¯E*ÅÝb
                    >
                    §+DØ#UâèïviMRÇÒg•‘´´Òußúh8¾8SbTç"4š¿ç¹6œcÔ¿üAÜ~ G-ì'“ï­p“™Ü£.oÔUMƐC;†Î¢¶Þ4FƳX¤Ó3W^ï=‹õ{v±(6Âëò=R}¤/hÊèè|Æ}*­MaÏ]%¼MÓÍyíºª$S”uÅóѓF OF]Øþ'GžD
                    > it is, the less likely to snarl.

                    Um... either I REALLY need more coffee this morning,
                    or your link came through as gobledy-gook....

                    > True, Rashid, but that only takes care of the making
                    > of a hackle.
                    > Sfandra still needs a sturdy, solid surface to which
                    > to be able to
                    > clamp the hackle, and may not have one. First
                    > thought would be a
                    > table, but if her only table is great-grandmother's
                    > still-perfect,
                    > gleaming French-polished mahogany dining table
                    > brought back as a
                    > wedding present by great-uncle when he finished up
                    > working in British
                    > Malaya on a rubber plantation (adventuresome lad!),
                    > that'll be ruled out.

                    LOL! I have a table. I have no C clamps.

                    S'OK though -- I'm getting the slicker brush tomorrow,
                    that ought to help. I'm also hoping to do a little
                    poking around for pre-braided hair.

                    As for braid finishing.... Did you know that there's a
                    company that makes glue sticks for standard craft glue
                    guns in colors to match hair extentions?? :D :D GLEE!


                    Thanks for the tips,
                    Sfandra

                    ******************
                    Posadnitsa Sfandra Dmitrieva Chernigova
                    KOE, Maunche, Apprentice to Maitresse Irene LeNoir
                    Haus Von Drakenklaue
                    Kingdom of the East
                    ******************
                    Never 'pearl' your butt.
                  • borderlands15213
                    That s gobbledegook, all right. I m presuming it s mine and not Wyndylyn s. Or, it could be both of ours. I m not having trouble that I know of on any other
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 4, 2008
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                      That's gobbledegook, all right. I'm presuming it's mine and not
                      Wyndylyn's.
                      Or, it could be both of ours. I'm not having trouble that I know of
                      on any other list,
                      Oh! Just noticed "less likely to snarl," which suggests Rashid's
                      post, and I've also noticed that part of that...erm, text looks to be
                      Cyrillic. Not that it means much to me no matter what alphabet it is...
                      Anyway, I'm trying again with that section of my post which seems to
                      have been 'gobbledegooked.' If this doesn't come through clear and
                      clean, you might want to read via the Yahoo Group web site.
                      I had written:
                      "I was wondering about two things, here: one, in addition to dampening
                      the kanekalon hair with a plant mister/spritzing bottle is raising the
                      humidity in the immediate working area by means of one of those
                      table-top misters or humidifiers that produces a cool or cold mist
                      (works on some sonic principle, or something like that.) If you can,
                      borrow this. Ideally, you'll find access to one that has controls for
                      mist volume and mist density.
                      "The other is, assuming you're making what we called a "three-braid,"
                      when we were kids--moving alternate outside portions of the material
                      being braided over the center section--would it help to have wrapped
                      each section in strips of muslin, much like bandaging a race-horse's
                      legs, before you begin braiding? The muslin, being cotton, won't
                      generate much static nor provide as much opportunity for the kanekalon
                      to produce static against itself, and if you wrap from the bottom of
                      the strand upward toward where you're going to begin working, you can
                      unwrap a turn or so to expose the next inch or three of fake hair.
                      "Yes, this is tedious. When you wrap, you have to have enough overlap
                      to keep the hair covered and manageable; and in the unwrapping, you
                      have to keep the loose ends of the wrappings out of the way, somehow
                      (safety-pin each back on its own wrapped-up area?) and you'd have to
                      have some smaller strip of something like muslin, or some natural
                      fiber cord (again, to avoid static) or some type of clamp to keep the
                      braid from coming loose while you pause in the braiding to unwrapped
                      another few inches of each of the three sections of hair.
                      "I'm one of those belt-and-suspender types, though, and I like to have
                      my materials under control, so I'll accept tedious and even
                      inconvenient, and slower, in order to achieve that end."


                      --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, Sfandra <seonaid13@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > > > > > I've worked with this
                      > >
                      > stufÝã̚,`A€H)Ô׊r'v§ÓI·WÒÉJºkPµw]uZKÉÞ]¦çÍ2¦ðII³δ ¢mqUXy\
                      > > ég8J•¢‰ÎŠ\TG.­óûöìÎHOt
                      > > ӈ„M$…1‚~Q'$¤«0"¯E*ÅÝb
                      > >
                      >
                      §+DØ#UâèïviMRÇÒg•`´´Òußúh8¾8SbTç"4š¿ç¹6œcÔ¿üAÜ~ G-ì'"ï­p"™Ü£.oÔUMƐC;†Î¢¶Þ4FƳX¤Ó3W^ï=‹õ{v±(6Âëò=R}¤/hÊèè|Æ}*­MaÏ]%¼MÓÍyíºª$S"uÅóÑ"F OF]Øþ'GžD
                      > > it is, the less likely to snarl.
                      >
                      > Um... either I REALLY need more coffee this morning,
                      > or your link came through as gobledy-gook....
                      >
                      > > True, Rashid, but that only takes care of the making
                      > > of a hackle.
                      > > Sfandra still needs a sturdy, solid surface to which
                      > > to be able to
                      > > clamp the hackle, and may not have one. First
                      > > thought would be a
                      > > table, but if her only table is great-grandmother's
                      > > still-perfect,
                      > > gleaming French-polished mahogany dining table
                      > > brought back as a
                      > > wedding present by great-uncle when he finished up
                      > > working in British
                      > > Malaya on a rubber plantation (adventuresome lad!),
                      > > that'll be ruled out.
                      >
                      > LOL! I have a table. I have no C clamps.
                      >
                      > S'OK though -- I'm getting the slicker brush tomorrow,
                      > that ought to help. I'm also hoping to do a little
                      > poking around for pre-braided hair.
                      >
                      > As for braid finishing.... Did you know that there's a
                      > company that makes glue sticks for standard craft glue
                      > guns in colors to match hair extentions?? :D :D GLEE!
                      >
                      >
                      > Thanks for the tips,
                      > Sfandra
                      >
                      > ******************
                      > Posadnitsa Sfandra Dmitrieva Chernigova
                      > KOE, Maunche, Apprentice to Maitresse Irene LeNoir
                      > Haus Von Drakenklaue
                      > Kingdom of the East
                      > ******************
                      > Never 'pearl' your butt.
                      >
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