Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [SCA-Milliners] Re: Durer portrait hat

Expand Messages
  • Jackie Bowin
    mushroom. Definately looks like a mushroom to me. Magdalen Bowen _________________________________________________________________ MSN Photos is the easiest
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 15, 2001
      mushroom. Definately looks like a mushroom to me.

      Magdalen Bowen



      _________________________________________________________________
      MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos:
      http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx
    • jillwheezul
      Hello all, I m new to the list as of today, but have some information on this headress. I ve been studying 16th Century Germanic costume the past couple of
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 15, 2002
        Hello all,

        I'm new to the list as of today, but have some information on this
        headress. I've been studying 16th Century Germanic costume the past
        couple of years and here's what I've learned:

        The book Textiler Hausrat, Kleidung und Haustextilien in Nurnberg von
        1500-1650 by Jutta Zander-Seidel, the textile curator at the
        Germanische National Museum in Nurnberg, shows this very picture of
        Frau Tucher to discuss this style of headgear which, in this
        instance, she calls a Steuchlein. She sites several wills and
        inventories that include mention of Steuchlein(s). She goes on to
        tell about the undercap, at least in several examples, that is called
        a Wulsthauben or Wulste (umlaut on the u), that together with the
        cotton, wool, linen or silk veil, usually sheer, (Schleier) makes up
        the Steuchlein. She also includes an example of the Wulsthauben from
        another Durer drawing dated 1503. Let me know if you want me to post
        a scan in the files! She sites the inventory of one Maria Sitzinger
        where it can be determined that the complete steuchlein consisted of
        an undercap and a veil. Other spellings include stuhha and stauche.

        I personally think that besides the Wulstlein, which, in the example
        shown appears to be a formed and felted cap, that it is not a far
        stretch to look at the intricate turban (gebende) of the 15th century
        to speculate that some of the foundation pieces are merely formed and
        stuffed padded rolls attached to a solid cap to keep in on the head.
        My humble opinion, but information on these caps seems somewhat
        sparse! And it seems that the mushroom hat is an apt description,
        but I like scallion head on some of the more extreme examples :-)

        When the veil (perhaps a second, not sheer) covers the head and goes
        around the chin, the name of the headgear becomes the bundlein, which
        was appropriate church wear. On another note, related for church
        wear was the intricately folded and pinned (I always think the flying
        nun)veil headress, called the Sturz.

        In general, the German word Haube, generally meaning cap or coif can
        also be used as a name for the cap.

        Sincerely,

        Katherine Barich
        An Tir

        --- In SCA-Milliners@y..., "mary_m_haselbauer"
        <mary_m_haselbauer@y...> wrote:
        > http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/durer_tucher.jpg.html
        >
        > Any ideas of a good name to call this hat. When I wore mine to a
        demo
        > that was almost the most popular question.
        >
        > Thank,
        > Slaine
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.