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Durer portrait hat

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  • mary_m_haselbauer
    http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/durer_tucher.jpg.html Any ideas of a good name to call this hat. When I wore mine to a demo that was almost the most
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 13, 2001
      http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/durer_tucher.jpg.html

      Any ideas of a good name to call this hat. When I wore mine to a demo
      that was almost the most popular question.

      Thank,
      Slaine
    • Cynthia Virtue
      ... And they re all over the place in this time period -- but I haven t heard of a name for it. Does look a bit like she was attacked by Poppin Fresh, eh?
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 13, 2001
        mary_m_haselbauer wrote:

        > http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/durer_tucher.jpg.html
        >
        > Any ideas of a good name to call this hat. When I wore mine to a demo
        > that was almost the most popular question.


        And they're all over the place in this time period -- but I haven't
        heard of a name for it. Does look a bit like she was attacked by
        Poppin' Fresh, eh?

        (As a side note, for fans of German Ren, I just saw most of the Sigorney
        Weaver Snow White movie. Great costuming. Hats even on the female
        leads, most of the time. Not for anyone younger than 15 or so, though
        -- quite eerie.)

        --
        Cynthia Virtue and/or
        Cynthia du Pré Argent

        Everyone needs a warm hood for winter -- why not make a medieval style
        one? http://www.virtue.to/articles/hoodlum.html
      • myrddinsdottir
        I have no idea what it s called either - although I do like Cynthia s description - but I would love to know how you made it. Please? Sophia ... demo
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 14, 2001
          I have no idea what it's called either - although I do like Cynthia's
          description - but I would love to know how you made it. Please?

          Sophia



          --- In SCA-Milliners@y..., "mary_m_haselbauer"
          <mary_m_haselbauer@y...> wrote:
          > http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/durer_tucher.jpg.html
          >
          > Any ideas of a good name to call this hat. When I wore mine to a
          demo
          > that was almost the most popular question.
          >
          > Thank,
          > Slaine
        • Mary Haselbauer
          I just so happens I ve been typing up the documentation for this weekend (almost a year after I made the thing - oops) The demo in question was at the St.
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 14, 2001
            I just so happens I've been typing up the
            documentation for this weekend (almost a year after I
            made the thing - oops) The demo in question was at the
            St. Louis Art Museum. They had a special exhibition of
            Northern Renaissance Stained Glass windows and asked
            us to do a demo.
            Slaine

            Durer Portrait Hat

            In portraits it looks like this style of hat is made
            from a framework of thin light brown strips. You can
            see the outline of the strips through the fabric.
            These could possibly be thin pieces of wood or
            perhaps reeds. Of all the hats in this style no two
            have the same pattern for the frame so it is unlikely
            that there was only one way to do this.

            I made my hat with a basic framework of wire connected
            with duct tape. Not period at all but both were
            readily available materials. I�ve used commercially
            made baskets as the base of hats before so I looked
            for a hat of the correct shape or perhaps basket
            making materials. I found neither. I ended up buying a
            square red basket made of flat strips of wood. This
            was the only one I could find not made out of willow
            branches. I soaked the basket for two weeks to soften
            the wood and remove the red dye. This worked better
            than I expected. I ended up tying the basket strips to
            my wire framework with plain old cotton string and
            letting them dry.

            First I covered the frame with a layer of ordinary
            cotton fabric. The outer layer is from an old silk
            blouse. I chose silk because in the portraits the
            fabric seems lightweight and translucent. I had a
            length of silk I intended to use but the tail of the
            blouse curved perfectly around the face.

            I wish I had made my frame out of more period
            materials. The lump of duct mate at the top of the
            forehead disrupts the line of the hat. However, this
            was a fairly dramatic hat for a demo made with very
            little expense.



            --- myrddinsdottir <myrddinsdottir@...> wrote:
            > I have no idea what it's called either - although I
            > do like Cynthia's
            > description - but I would love to know how you made
            > it. Please?
            >
            > Sophia
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In SCA-Milliners@y..., "mary_m_haselbauer"
            > <mary_m_haselbauer@y...> wrote:
            > >
            >
            http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/durer_tucher.jpg.html
            > >
            > > Any ideas of a good name to call this hat. When I
            > wore mine to a
            > demo
            > > that was almost the most popular question.
            > >
            > > Thank,
            > > Slaine
            >
            >


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          • Jackie Bowin
            mushroom. Definately looks like a mushroom to me. Magdalen Bowen _________________________________________________________________ MSN Photos is the easiest
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 15, 2001
              mushroom. Definately looks like a mushroom to me.

              Magdalen Bowen



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            • jillwheezul
              Hello all, I m new to the list as of today, but have some information on this headress. I ve been studying 16th Century Germanic costume the past couple of
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 15, 2002
                Hello all,

                I'm new to the list as of today, but have some information on this
                headress. I've been studying 16th Century Germanic costume the past
                couple of years and here's what I've learned:

                The book Textiler Hausrat, Kleidung und Haustextilien in Nurnberg von
                1500-1650 by Jutta Zander-Seidel, the textile curator at the
                Germanische National Museum in Nurnberg, shows this very picture of
                Frau Tucher to discuss this style of headgear which, in this
                instance, she calls a Steuchlein. She sites several wills and
                inventories that include mention of Steuchlein(s). She goes on to
                tell about the undercap, at least in several examples, that is called
                a Wulsthauben or Wulste (umlaut on the u), that together with the
                cotton, wool, linen or silk veil, usually sheer, (Schleier) makes up
                the Steuchlein. She also includes an example of the Wulsthauben from
                another Durer drawing dated 1503. Let me know if you want me to post
                a scan in the files! She sites the inventory of one Maria Sitzinger
                where it can be determined that the complete steuchlein consisted of
                an undercap and a veil. Other spellings include stuhha and stauche.

                I personally think that besides the Wulstlein, which, in the example
                shown appears to be a formed and felted cap, that it is not a far
                stretch to look at the intricate turban (gebende) of the 15th century
                to speculate that some of the foundation pieces are merely formed and
                stuffed padded rolls attached to a solid cap to keep in on the head.
                My humble opinion, but information on these caps seems somewhat
                sparse! And it seems that the mushroom hat is an apt description,
                but I like scallion head on some of the more extreme examples :-)

                When the veil (perhaps a second, not sheer) covers the head and goes
                around the chin, the name of the headgear becomes the bundlein, which
                was appropriate church wear. On another note, related for church
                wear was the intricately folded and pinned (I always think the flying
                nun)veil headress, called the Sturz.

                In general, the German word Haube, generally meaning cap or coif can
                also be used as a name for the cap.

                Sincerely,

                Katherine Barich
                An Tir

                --- In SCA-Milliners@y..., "mary_m_haselbauer"
                <mary_m_haselbauer@y...> wrote:
                > http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/durer/durer_tucher.jpg.html
                >
                > Any ideas of a good name to call this hat. When I wore mine to a
                demo
                > that was almost the most popular question.
                >
                > Thank,
                > Slaine
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