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Italian Renaissance Hair Taping

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  • Michelle Wiseman
    Greetings, My name is Carith de Cuevas and I hail from the Barony of Three Mountains in An Tir. I am seeking some very specific information on Italian
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 15, 2006
      Greetings,

      My name is Carith de Cuevas and I hail from the Barony of Three
      Mountains in An Tir. I am seeking some very specific information on
      Italian Renaissance Hair Taping. I have already taught 2 Ithra
      classes on the subject, but find that the students comments to both
      classes are the same as my own. I need to find more documentation to
      support some of the assumptions I am making. For example, when you
      put a veil on your head you would use a pin, but if you were puting
      up a bunch of braids on your head what would you use in lieu of bobby
      pins? Quilting pins seem a bit scary for that purpose. Also, how
      would you finish a braid without a rubber band? I assume you would
      use something along the lines of embroidery floss, but I don't know
      for sure.

      Does anyone have documentation about these topics?

      Further, there is a book I have been despirate to find that was
      supposed to be published in 2003 called "Plucked, Shaved and Braided"
      by Daniella Turudich. I have searched the Internet for 3 years, gone
      to every book vendor and library I could and even with the ISBN
      number I have gotten nowhere finding the book. However, why would
      there be an ISBN number for a book that was never published? I
      further found an interesting article in wikipia on the Mona Lisa
      where they reference the book in Note 9. Feel free to take a look.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mona_lisa

      Any thoughts or suggestions for good books would be much
      appreciated. I would be happy to send along my bibliographic
      information for anyone that might be interested as well.

      Yours in Service,
      HL Carith de Cuevas
      Courtier to the Baron of Three Mountains
      Retinue to their Majesties Amalric and Caia
    • Cindy Myers
      ... Maybe I m misunderstanding Italian hair taping, but I was under the impression that once you had your braid, you took a length of ribbon and a blunt needle
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 15, 2006
        > support some of the assumptions I am making. For example, when you
        > put a veil on your head you would use a pin, but if you were puting
        > up a bunch of braids on your head what would you use in lieu of bobby
        > pins? Quilting pins seem a bit scary for that purpose.

        Maybe I'm misunderstanding Italian hair taping, but I was under the
        impression that once you had your braid, you took a length of ribbon
        and a blunt needle and sewed the braid through the hair on your head
        to hold it (them) in place. That's what it looks like in the
        pictures - to me, anyway.

        I do something similar to hold my 14th century-style side braids up.
        No rubber bands or bobby pins needed.

        --Emmelyne
      • unclrashid
        I can t document it (cause I don t remember where I saw it) but I recall seeing info on hairpins (shaped like a U , modern ones are crimped, but I believe the
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 15, 2006
          I can't document it (cause I don't remember where I saw it) but I
          recall seeing info on hairpins (shaped like a "U", modern ones are
          crimped, but I believe the period ones where not). Try searching
          on "medieval hairpins".

          I've done a lot of hair stuff, and they do work, just not in the same
          way as bobby pins. They work better on fluffy, kinky hair than on limp
          straight hair. But if you have enough hair to make or braid or bun
          thicker than 3/8 inch (depth not width) they use the hair's own
          elasticity to hold in place. You put a hairpin in the same way that you
          would use a chopstick to hold a bun in place... insert hairpin near the
          outer edge of the bun, aiming directly at the scalp (perpendicular to
          scalp). Go under the hair which is beneath the bun (or braid) and push
          the hairpin, going prallel to the scalp. If possible, grab some of the
          braid on the way out, mirroring the way you went in.

          If the braid or bun does not have a little bit of thickness, then you
          need bobby pins, which use their own springiness to clamp onto the
          hair, so I guess medieval women with thinner hair probably lost
          hairpins all over the place.

          Rashid


          --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "Michelle Wiseman" <gribbit@...>
          wrote:
          >
          >
          > support some of the assumptions I am making. For example, when you
          > put a veil on your head you would use a pin, but if you were puting
          > up a bunch of braids on your head what would you use in lieu of bobby
          > pins? Quilting pins seem a bit scary for that purpose. Also, how
          > would you finish a braid without a rubber band? I assume you would
          > use something along the lines of embroidery floss, but I don't know
          > for sure.
          >
          > Does anyone have documentation about these topics?
          >
        • Cindy Myers
          ... The hairpins are described in _Dress Accessories_: Another type of wire hair ornament from London is a double ended, U-shaped pin decorated with
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 16, 2006
            From Rashid:
            > I can't document it (cause I don't remember where I saw it) but I
            > recall seeing info on hairpins (shaped like a "U", modern ones are
            > crimped, but I believe the period ones where not). Try searching
            > on "medieval hairpins".

            The "hairpins" are described in _Dress Accessories_: "Another type
            of wire hair ornament from London is a double ended, U-shaped pin
            decorated with twisted wire which was found at Finsbury Circus (MoL
            acc. no. A1384; fig 196)." A 14th century dating is speculated,
            along with its probable use "to hold in place a women's linen
            headdress..."

            There's a 1:1 scale b/w photo included, and from that I make the
            following observations:

            The pin is just about 8 cm long, with the top 2 cm at the peak of the
            turn and down each side taken up with the twisted wire decoration
            (which makes the end about 5mm wide). The decoration is fashioned
            like a tiny little spring of wire, and then that little spring is
            wound spring-like around the main wire of the pin. The ends appear
            pointed, and there's a fairly uniform 15 mm distance between the legs
            of the U.

            I can only imagine that if you managed to push it all the way into
            your hair (rather than through a veil), all the little spaces between
            the coils would snag your hair terribly. I've seen reproductions, so
            maybe those who have tried it in their hair can make a better
            observation. I'm more in favor of it being used to hold a veil,
            although I find it odd that you'd only be able to push in 6 cm and
            the last 2 cm (being stopped by the twists of wire) would stick out.
            It's quite a bit more "massive" than other pins with decorated heads.

            The hair taping I mentioned in an earlier message is described on the
            following web page: http://www.mfgraffix.com/hird/faoilt/hairtape.html
            I find some of her examples more convincing that others, but since
            I've been using linen thread to hold my hair in place I have to say
            that the "taping" could well be invisible, and would explain a lot.

            --Emmelyne
          • susang45@juno.com
            Hello Carith, You mention putting up braids for Italian Renaissance hair. I have looked at a lot of pictures from 1460 - 1510 in northern Italy and very few of
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 16, 2006
              Hello Carith,
              You mention putting up braids for Italian Renaissance hair. I have looked at a lot of
              pictures from 1460 - 1510 in northern Italy and very few of the women actually have their
              hair braided. Is this the period you are looking at? The link for hairtaping shows portraits
              from a wide time span and several different geographic places. Some are braided and some
              are not. Wait, I have an idea!..... I just went and put up my daughters hair. I pulled it
              together low on the back of her head and I twisted it like a rope. I laid it on her head in a
              loop. Held the loop with one hand and sewed it in place with the other. It took about 5
              minutes and has now been in for about a half hour. She's been trotting around helping with
              dinner and it's staying up fine. Maybe they didn't need pins or ties. I just tucked the ends
              under and sewed over them. I just posted pics at
              http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Milliners/photos/browse/43bb?c=

              This is so cool!. Thanks for the challenge. When I do my own hair I use hair ties and bobby
              pins cause my hair is short and I can't see the back of my head. I must train my girls or
              spouse to do this for me!!

              Lucrezia

              Greetings,

              My name is Carith de Cuevas and I hail from the Barony of Three
              Mountains in An Tir. I am seeking some very specific information on
              Italian Renaissance Hair Taping. I have already taught 2 Ithra
              classes on the subject, but find that the students comments to both
              classes are the same as my own. I need to find more documentation to
              support some of the assumptions I am making. For example, when you
              put a veil on your head you would use a pin, but if you were puting
              up a bunch of braids on your head what would you use in lieu of bobby
              pins? Quilting pins seem a bit scary for that purpose. Also, how
              would you finish a braid without a rubber band? I assume you would
              use something along the lines of embroidery floss, but I don't know
              for sure.

              Does anyone have documentation about these topics?




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            • Cynthia Virtue
              ... (snip) ... Not necessarily. I have a modern large hairpin from Revlon, meant to secure a bun in one fell swoop, which is constructed nearly the same way.
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 17, 2006
                Cindy Myers wrote:

                > The "hairpins" are described in _Dress Accessories_: "Another type
                > of wire hair ornament from London is a double ended, U-shaped pin
                > decorated with twisted wire which was found at Finsbury Circus (MoL
                > acc. no. A1384; fig 196)."
                (snip)
                > I can only imagine that if you managed to push it all the way into
                > your hair (rather than through a veil), all the little spaces between
                > the coils would snag your hair terribly. I've seen reproductions, so
                > maybe those who have tried it in their hair can make a better
                > observation.

                Not necessarily. I have a modern large hairpin from Revlon, meant to
                secure a bun in one fell swoop, which is constructed nearly the same
                way. The wire wrapping doesn't snag the hair.

                I'm not sure how you'd shove the medieval version through a veil,
                though. I don't recall the ends being particularly pointy.

                --
                Cynthia Virtue and/or Cynthia du Pre Argent

                "Love is friendship set on fire."
                -- Jeremy Taylor, ca. 1650
              • Giovanna d'Este
                What a friend of mine and I have discovered is as follows: (Her hair is quite curly and mine is dead straight.) If someone else is doing your hairstyling for
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 17, 2006
                  What a friend of mine and I have discovered is as follows: (Her hair is
                  quite curly and mine is dead straight.)

                  If someone else is doing your hairstyling for you, with you handing them
                  comb, etc, then: It's possible to whip the ends of the braids with ribbon
                  and trim it to length. It's also then possible to create the circular
                  coronet effect by taking the braids and crossing them across the top of the
                  head,tucking the ends under the other braid. And we don't need pins if the
                  person whose hair is being worked on reaches up and holds the crossing point
                  steady while the other person manipulates the needle and tape.

                  I personally love the style, as it gets my very long hair UP and OUT OF MY
                  FACE and unlike doing a french twist or standard bun, I don't have pins
                  irritating my scalp. I can sleep in it, and over a three-day period it
                  loosens just enough that I have a few pretty wisps of hair round my face.
                  Even then I can take a wet cloth and smooth them back in place and use a jot
                  of hairspray to keep them there.

                  We haven't ever tried a hair-colored linen thread for the taping. We might
                  do that sometime. I generally use white grosgrain ribbon, which provides an
                  attractive contrast to my hair and has enough tooth to grab and hold.

                  Generally the night before the event, all the women in my household meet at
                  one house and do last minute planning while we tape each others' hair up.
                  (grin)

                  Al vostro servizio,
                  Signora Giovanna d'Este

                  Vert, on a billet Or three fleurs-de-lys, one and two, sable, a bordure
                  dancetty Or.

                  "Numquam Succumbe"

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                • Jens Börner
                  Hi, My girlfriend is using those ( http://www.diu-minnezit.de/realie_details.php?sid=0
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 17, 2006
                    Hi,

                    My girlfriend is using those (
                    http://www.diu-minnezit.de/realie_details.php?sid=0
                    <http://www.diu-minnezit.de/realie_details.php?sid=0&lid=0&rid=72&tid=3>
                    &lid=0&rid=72&tid=3 )
                    for her hair with 14 century braids without problems; they are quite
                    decorative and no hair is caught in the wire frame in general.

                    with kind regards,
                    Jens Boerner
                    Diu Minnezît


                    _____

                    Von: SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com] Im
                    Auftrag von Cynthia Virtue
                    Gesendet: Sonntag, 17. September 2006 12:44
                    An: SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com
                    Betreff: Re: [SCA-Milliners] Re: Italian Renaissance Hair Taping



                    Cindy Myers wrote:

                    > The "hairpins" are described in _Dress Accessories_: "Another type
                    > of wire hair ornament from London is a double ended, U-shaped pin
                    > decorated with twisted wire which was found at Finsbury Circus (MoL
                    > acc. no. A1384; fig 196)."
                    (snip)
                    > I can only imagine that if you managed to push it all the way into
                    > your hair (rather than through a veil), all the little spaces between
                    > the coils would snag your hair terribly. I've seen reproductions, so
                    > maybe those who have tried it in their hair can make a better
                    > observation.

                    Not necessarily. I have a modern large hairpin from Revlon, meant to
                    secure a bun in one fell swoop, which is constructed nearly the same
                    way. The wire wrapping doesn't snag the hair.

                    I'm not sure how you'd shove the medieval version through a veil,
                    though. I don't recall the ends being particularly pointy.

                    --
                    Cynthia Virtue and/or Cynthia du Pre Argent

                    "Love is friendship set on fire."
                    -- Jeremy Taylor, ca. 1650





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