Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Veil Pins

Expand Messages
  • Melissa
    Are you saying 5 inches? I just want to be clear.
    Message 1 of 16 , Aug 3, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Are you saying 5 inches? I just want to be clear.
    • Cynthia Virtue
      ... Yep. I don t know how you d use something like that, because all the medival paintings I know, where you can see the pins, show ones which are, overall,
      Message 2 of 16 , Aug 3, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Melissa wrote:

        > Are you saying 5 inches? I just want to be clear.

        Yep.

        I don't know how you'd use something like that, because all the medival
        paintings I know, where you can see the pins, show ones which are,
        overall, not much more than an inch or two.

        Oh: wait: there's the pins at the top of the "ears" in the "Lovers and
        St. Elegius" painting -- although those have large beads at the top so
        the veil doesn't punch down through them.

        Image of the lady: http://www.virtue.to/articles/images/1449_elegius.jpg

        The ones I have (bought from Master Gaukler) were insufficiently
        interesting to go to a museum. They have wrapped wire heads, very
        small. They are gold colored (now) and slightly rough (now.) I don't
        know if they were gold or rough when they were being used. A slightly
        rough surface would hold silk veils better than modern pins, though.

        I really should take some good photos of them and put them on my website.

        The Museum of London Dress Accessories book has many photos and drawings
        of pins that have been found from this time period.

        --
        Cynthia Virtue and/or Cynthia du Pre Argent

        "Love is friendship set on fire."
        -- Jeremy Taylor, ca. 1650
      • Melissa
        Thanks that is intersting. I would think an inch or 2 would work, I would think that maybe the longer ones were for the wealthy women? Or noble women? I ll
        Message 3 of 16 , Aug 3, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks that is intersting. I would think an inch or 2 would work, I
          would think that maybe the longer ones were for the wealthy women?
          Or noble women?
          I'll keep researching.
          thanks
        • Kristen Dahle
          I use 5 pins for holding a straw hat onto my head, pinning through the veils, so that I don t have to use a chin strap. I ve also used long pins for holding
          Message 4 of 16 , Aug 3, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            I use 5" pins for holding a straw hat onto my head, pinning through the
            veils, so that I don't have to use a chin strap. I've also used long pins
            for holding hat structures (like straw horns) to my head by pinning through
            my braids. I like to have very smooth pins for that so that they don't tear
            my hair apart.

            Otherwise I use smaller pins. The ones that pin men's shirts together at
            department stores are nice. I've also just found some very pretty "crystal"
            glass head ones at JoAnn Fabrics in the quilting department. They're
            comparatively expensive, about $15 for a box of 200. I haven't gotten them
            yet, so I don't have a brand name.

            Pax,
            Elisa
          • Melissa
            My next question is 20 guage wire ok to use as a veil pin?
            Message 5 of 16 , Aug 3, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              My next question is 20 guage wire ok to use as a veil pin?
            • mazzard@mail.com
              I took pliers and wrenched the plastic heads off some corsage (sp) pins and glued beads to the end. You can also paint the plastic heads with nail polish (all
              Message 6 of 16 , Aug 4, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                I took pliers and wrenched the plastic heads off some corsage (sp) pins
                and glued beads to the end. You can also paint the plastic heads with
                nail polish (all those wonderful little bottles of cheap polish in the
                teenage makeup section at Walmart...) and glue beads beneath the head on
                the pin length. Spacer beads shaped like flowers and bead caps work very
                well. You can match your outfits and if you lose one, it's only a few
                cents to replace. There are pewter beads shaped like twisted wire that
                would make authentic-appearing heads. I've also put loose jump rings
                between the beads and linked swinging bead fringe from that. Lots of
                options - you could attach tiny silk tassels or Fimo shapes as the pin
                metal isn't affected by baking. I've never baked one with the original
                plastic head, tho. But, we are a simple people here and easily amused,
                Lady Cerise of Vatavia

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Melissa
                To: SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [SCA-Milliners] Re: Veil Pins
                Date: Thu, 03 Aug 2006 17:26:37 -0000


                Thanks that is intersting. I would think an inch or 2 would work, I
                would think that maybe the longer ones were for the wealthy women?
                Or noble women?
                I'll keep researching.
                thanks







                Community email addresses:
                Post message: SCA-Milliners@onelist.com
                Subscribe: SCA-Milliners-subscribe@onelist.com
                Unsubscribe: SCA-Milliners-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                List owner: SCA-Milliners-owner@onelist.com

                Shortcut URL to this page:
                http://www.onelist.com/community/SCA-Milliners
                Yahoo! Groups Links




                --
                ___________________________________________________
                Play 100s of games for FREE! http://games.mail.com/



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tonkin, Rebecca (PIRSA-SARDI)
                I would say as long as is necessary and comfortable. There are pictures of medieval pins in the Museum of London Dress Accessories book. I use ordinary
                Message 7 of 16 , Aug 6, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  I would say as long as is necessary and comfortable. There are pictures of medieval pins in the Museum of London Dress Accessories book.
                  I use ordinary dress-making pins, either in brass or stainless steel usually. I have also used corsage/florist's pins, which are bigger and sharper, and have pearls on the ends.
                  HTH,
                  Rebecca

                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > How long should they be?
                  >
                  >
                • m d b
                  ... pictures of medieval pins in the Museum of London Dress Accessories book. ... usually. I have also used corsage/florist s pins, which are bigger and
                  Message 8 of 16 , Aug 7, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > I would say as long as is necessary and comfortable. There are
                    pictures of medieval pins in the Museum of London Dress Accessories
                    book.
                    > I use ordinary dress-making pins, either in brass or stainless steel
                    usually. I have also used corsage/florist's pins, which are bigger and
                    sharper, and have pearls on the ends.

                    I used quilters pins recently (rather longer and have more grip than
                    regular pins, sort of similar to the corsage pins but much smaller
                    heads*) then some shorter glass headed pins for my most recent
                    millinery endeavor:
                    http://costumes.glittersweet.com/sca/k/2cleves.htm
                    The photos were taken when I was using the glass headed pins, which
                    practically disappear.
                    I find getting the tension right for any headdress (for the above it
                    was the undercap and making sure it wasn't about to shift around, for
                    my flat cap it was making sure the hole was just barely big enough
                    etc) makes a gret deal of difference as to what strength of pin I need.

                    Well that and the actual shape are important. If the pin needs to
                    secure the headdress/hat to an internal support, then the longer the
                    better.

                    Willemyne
                    http://glittersweet.com
                    *at least here anyway;) The corsage pins all have tear shaped pearls
                    on the end.
                  • Ottavia Fortunati
                    That is an amazing dress and headcovering. Please, how does it stay on your head? Is it that tight? or is the black part pinned to something underneath? I am
                    Message 9 of 16 , Aug 8, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      That is an amazing dress and headcovering. Please, how does it stay on your head? Is it that tight? or is the black part pinned to something underneath?
                      I am facinated.
                      Ottavia

                      m d b <vcairistiona@...> wrote:
                      > I would say as long as is necessary and comfortable. There are
                      pictures of medieval pins in the Museum of London Dress Accessories
                      book.
                      > I use ordinary dress-making pins, either in brass or stainless steel
                      usually. I have also used corsage/florist's pins, which are bigger and
                      sharper, and have pearls on the ends.

                      I used quilters pins recently (rather longer and have more grip than
                      regular pins, sort of similar to the corsage pins but much smaller
                      heads*) then some shorter glass headed pins for my most recent
                      millinery endeavor:
                      http://costumes.glittersweet.com/sca/k/2cleves.htm
                      The photos were taken when I was using the glass headed pins, which
                      practically disappear.
                      I find getting the tension right for any headdress (for the above it
                      was the undercap and making sure it wasn't about to shift around, for
                      my flat cap it was making sure the hole was just barely big enough
                      etc) makes a gret deal of difference as to what strength of pin I need.

                      Well that and the actual shape are important. If the pin needs to
                      secure the headdress/hat to an internal support, then the longer the
                      better.

                      Willemyne
                      http://glittersweet.com
                      *at least here anyway;) The corsage pins all have tear shaped pearls
                      on the end.






                      ---------------------------------
                      Do you Yahoo!?
                      Next-gen email? Have it all with the all-new Yahoo! Mail Beta.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Karen
                      Most of my veil pins (and fancy hat pins) come from Lady Grace Whytteng, who sells medieval repros, as well as pins with animals, fruits, or flowers, at
                      Message 10 of 16 , Aug 9, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Most of my veil pins (and fancy hat pins) come from Lady Grace Whytteng, who sells medieval repros, as well as pins with animals, fruits, or flowers, at http://www.pin-money.net/pins.htm -- I have a lot of her more "abstract" pins, too, some of which coordinate nicely with my garb & headdresses. :)

                        Karen
                      • fionnghualaingheanuilliam
                        While at this last Collegium, a lady in the Hats and Headdresses class shared that she makes her own veil pins by using wire cutters to cut off the modern
                        Message 11 of 16 , Aug 11, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          While at this last Collegium, a lady in the "Hats and Headdresses"
                          class shared that she makes her own veil pins by using wire cutters
                          to cut off the "modern" part of a 2-3 inch safety pin (brass
                          preferably) and then uses a hammer to pound the curly end (opposite
                          of the point) flat so the fabric doesn't ride into the curl. I
                          tried this and the pins turn out great. She said she carries pieces
                          of felt with 4 pins on each piece to give as favors/tokens when she
                          runs into a lady with a slippy veil.

                          YIS,
                          Fionnghuala





                          --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "Melissa"
                          <ceraingentuathail@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > How long should they be?
                          >
                        • Cynthia Virtue
                          And you can also find strong pins that are dull, and slip a glass bead onto them, and either superglue it in place, or use a crimp bead. I ve seen variations
                          Message 12 of 16 , Aug 11, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            And you can also find strong pins that are dull, and slip a glass bead
                            onto them, and either superglue it in place, or use a crimp bead. I've
                            seen variations on those and they are pretty, and easy to make.

                            --
                            Cynthia Virtue and/or Cynthia du Pre Argent

                            "Love is friendship set on fire."
                            -- Jeremy Taylor, ca. 1650
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.