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Trouble with sewing buckram - weird pattern?

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  • cjhtempest
    Greetings from a newbie! Quick intro, then to the quandary: I currently sing with a madrigal group and this has reawakened my interest in creating my own garb,
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1 11:05 AM
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      Greetings from a newbie!

      Quick intro, then to the quandary: I currently sing with a madrigal group and this has
      reawakened my interest in creating my own garb, especially hats! While not currently a
      SCAdian, I used to attend events and dance practice regularly. My sewing skills are
      mediocre at best, but I make up for it in determination! I've made about a dozen hats so
      far - flat hats, cauls and italian bonnets.

      My quandary: I'm trying to make the cavalier hat from the instructions I found here
      http://members.tripod.com/~GarbMonger/cavalier/cavalier1.html
      But I'm running into problems at the point of attaching the crown pieces together. I just
      can't get the needle through two layers of heavy buckram and one layer of fashion fabric.
      Or if I do manage to force the needle through, the stitches aren't consistent and look
      horrible and loose. I can't imagine trying to do this with a machine!

      I *am* using a heavy curved milliners' needle.

      Should I take out one of the layers of buckram and try again? Is this "free" pattern worth
      what I paid for it? (I've found errors in his flat cap instructions but survived to make a
      decent hat anyway.)

      Advice or sympathy appreciated!

      Carla
      aka Lady Beatrix della Tempesta
      Elizabethan Syngers
    • ciorstan@comcast.net
      There are a number of skilled hatmakers here, so this is an excellent place to ask. What I do is treat the buckram hat as a form to slip-cover, like
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 1 11:32 AM
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        There are a number of skilled hatmakers here, so this is an excellent place to ask.

        What I do is treat the buckram hat as a form to slip-cover, like upholstery. I've tried making hats over buckram forms in a couple of different ways, and the one I like the best is as follows:

        Make up the buckram form. If one decides to wire the hat pieces, cover the wired edges of the buckram with a piece of fold-over bias tape. Stitch the form together by whip/butting the bias tape together. Fit the underlayer of thin padding (in Britain, that's called domette; one can use quilt batting or flannel, depending on your taste) first and tack it down, then fit the fashion fabric layer.

        I machine stitch the exterior layer together and apply it to the padded form ensuring that the hand stitching I need to do for attachment is not only minimal but invisible. I run a line of handstitched anchor stitches in the ditch along the seam between crown and brim on the exterior, and then whip/hem the underbrim to the inside of the crown. Then I put in the lining and butt/whip that to the underside of the brim, then cover that with a grosgrain ribbon for a "Petersham".

        ciorstan

        -------------- Original message --------------
        From: "cjhtempest" <yahoo@...>

        > Greetings from a newbie!
        >
        > Quick intro, then to the quandary: I currently sing with a madrigal group and
        > this has
        > reawakened my interest in creating my own garb, especially hats! While not
        > currently a
        > SCAdian, I used to attend events and dance practice regularly. My sewing skills
        > are
        > mediocre at best, but I make up for it in determination! I've made about a dozen
        > hats so
        > far - flat hats, cauls and italian bonnets.
        >
        > My quandary: I'm trying to make the cavalier hat from the instructions I found
        > here
        > http://members.tripod.com/~GarbMonger/cavalier/cavalier1.html
        > But I'm running into problems at the point of attaching the crown pieces
        > together. I just
        > can't get the needle through two layers of heavy buckram and one layer of
        > fashion fabric.
        > Or if I do manage to force the needle through, the stitches aren't consistent
        > and look
        > horrible and loose. I can't imagine trying to do this with a machine!
        >
        > I *am* using a heavy curved milliners' needle.
        >
        > Should I take out one of the layers of buckram and try again? Is this "free"
        > pattern worth
        > what I paid for it? (I've found errors in his flat cap instructions but survived
        > to make a
        > decent hat anyway.)
        >
        > Advice or sympathy appreciated!
        >
        > Carla
        > aka Lady Beatrix della Tempesta
        > Elizabethan Syngers

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • m d b
        ... upholstery. I do pretty much the same, though my latest effort required a lot more handsewing and, because I had to steam the buckram to create a rounder
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 1 5:19 PM
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          > What I do is treat the buckram hat as a form to slip-cover, like
          upholstery.

          I do pretty much the same, though my latest effort required a lot
          more handsewing and, because I had to steam the buckram to create a
          rounder shape, I had to sew the outer layers seperately by hand and
          ease them over the curve.

          The fact it was covered in pearls and sequins was another issue:
          http://costumes.glittersweet.com/sca/k/2cleveshat.htm
          buckram base sewn together, felt padding cover, then lining and shell
          fabrics, all sewn on seperately.
          You can also see I "quilted" a layer of felt to a layer of buckram
          for the "lappets" which is another option for extra stability between
          those two layers.

          So perhaps you could machine the the two pieces of buckram, hand sew
          those together and make the outerlayer seperately. I would recommend
          a padding. You can tack the outerlayers to it to stop them twisting
          about for one.

          If you use a layer of felt inside and out you may find you only need
          one layer of backram anyway. I know how hard it can be to sew through
          two layers. I have bent a few needles on the above project;)

          Willemyne van Nymegen/Michaela de Bruce
          http://glittersweet.com
        • cjhtempest
          OK, let me make sure I m understanding...How s this for a plan of attack. Single layer pieces of buckram, the fashion fabric, a lining fabric and two layers of
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 3 8:08 PM
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            OK, let me make sure I'm understanding...How's this for a plan of attack. Single layer
            pieces of buckram, the fashion fabric, a lining fabric and two layers of quilting/padding
            fabric. Glue the padding to sandwich the buckram. While still damp, shape the pieces into
            the correct 3D puzzle. Hand-sew the buckram pieces together. Machine-sew the fashion
            fabric together, repeat for the lining fabric. Hand-sew the fashion fabric to the topside
            padding (without going all the way through the buckram - ha I think she's got it!) Hand-
            sew the lining fabric to the otherside padding.

            Hmm, I haven't even begun to consider the mechanics of attaching the crown to the brim
            (completed, BTW) but perhaps this is where I can use the tip of bias tape from the other
            poster.

            Thanks! I'll have a hat worthy of my ridiculously long ostrich feather yet!

            -Carla
            aka Lady Beatrix della Tempesta
            Elizabethan Syngers



            --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, "m d b" <vcairistiona@...> wrote:
            >
            > > What I do is treat the buckram hat as a form to slip-cover, like
            > upholstery.
            >
            > I do pretty much the same, though my latest effort required a lot
            > more handsewing and, because I had to steam the buckram to create a
            > rounder shape, I had to sew the outer layers seperately by hand and
            > ease them over the curve.
            >
            > The fact it was covered in pearls and sequins was another issue:
            > http://costumes.glittersweet.com/sca/k/2cleveshat.htm
            > buckram base sewn together, felt padding cover, then lining and shell
            > fabrics, all sewn on seperately.
            > You can also see I "quilted" a layer of felt to a layer of buckram
            > for the "lappets" which is another option for extra stability between
            > those two layers.
            >
            > So perhaps you could machine the the two pieces of buckram, hand sew
            > those together and make the outerlayer seperately. I would recommend
            > a padding. You can tack the outerlayers to it to stop them twisting
            > about for one.
            >
            > If you use a layer of felt inside and out you may find you only need
            > one layer of backram anyway. I know how hard it can be to sew through
            > two layers. I have bent a few needles on the above project;)
            >
            > Willemyne van Nymegen/Michaela de Bruce
            > http://glittersweet.com
            >
          • Rebecca Egan
            The fact it was covered in pearls and sequins was another issue: http://costumes.glittersweet.com/sca/k/2cleveshat.htmOk I know totally off point here
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 13, 2006
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              The fact it was covered in pearls and sequins was another issue:
              http://costumes.glittersweet.com/sca/k/2cleveshat.htmOk I know totally off point here but........ Can I say WOW, that hat is lovely!



              Lady Gabriella Rizo
              Kingdom of the Outlands
              Barony of Unser Hafen
              Canton of Bofarrach
              Smiling Bull Tavern



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