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Funky Fillets

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  • Kristine Elliott
    As you may have realized, I am focussing on fillets these days. I picked up a new art book the other day and saw some fillets details I hadn t seen before. I
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 3, 2005
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      As you may have realized, I am focussing on fillets these days. I picked up
      a new art book the other day and saw some fillets details I hadn't seen
      before. I thought I would share them with you. I put them in the Files
      section in the Cateline folder. I am also sharing my thoughts and questions.
       Thanks.

      Funky Fillets 1 The Massacre of the Innocents, North Transcept, Notre Dame,
      Paris, middle 13th century p. 32 Hogstaetter, Hans H., Art of the Late
      Middle Ages, NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. 1968.

      Here, the fillets as well as the barbettes appear to be wrapped, and have
      been made deliberately wider to wrinkle when wrapped. Is that what you see?
      Do you think that there is any stiffening in the fillets? For the life of
      me, I can't decide if there is bare hair under the fillet and barbette or
      another layer there covering the hair.

      Funky Fillets 2 Resurrection of the Dead on Judgement Day, cathedral of St.
      Etienne, Bourges, c 1270-80 p. 34 Hogstaetter, Hans H., Art of the Late
      Middle Ages, NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. 1968.

      Fillet seems to be composed of a ring of flat surfaces rather than a smooth
      cylinder. Do you think this represents a different method or material for
      the fillet or is it just some kind of artifact of the sculptor's method?

      Funky Fillets 3 St. Louis with Margaret of Provence, end of 13th or
      beginning of 14th century, p 111 Hogstaetter, Hans H., Art of the Late
      Middle Ages, NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. 1968.

      I'm looking here at those three holes in the front of the fillet. My first
      thought was that those were to aid the attachment of a crown or crown-like
      decoration to the sculpture. My second thought was that in that case surely
      the veil wouldn't be overlaying the crown on the sides and the back. What do
      you think?

      Funky Fillets 4 Tomb of Knight Templar, Temple Church London, c1250. P. 48
      Hogstaetter, Hans H., Art of the Late Middle Ages, NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.
      1968.

      My husband says the ring around his head is to help hold the pot helm on. Is
      he correct? Does this have any relation to the women's fillet?

      Cateline


      --
      http://www.geocities.com/souriete/

      "I have come to the conclusion that this administration values loyalty more
      than anything else, more than competence or, frankly, more than the truth."
      Rep. Christopher Shays.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Cynthia Virtue
      ... I think it s supposed to be bandages, not formal fillets. Or Biblical head-wrappings. ... I don t think it s a sculpt artifact. It may be a variation on
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 3, 2005
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        Kristine Elliott wrote:
        > Funky Fillets 1 The Massacre of the Innocents,
        > Here, the fillets as well as the barbettes appear to be wrapped, and have
        > been made deliberately wider to wrinkle when wrapped. Is that what you see?

        I think it's supposed to be bandages, not formal fillets. Or Biblical
        head-wrappings.

        > Funky Fillets 2 Resurrection of the Dead on Judgement Day,
        > Fillet seems to be composed of a ring of flat surfaces rather than a smooth
        > cylinder. Do you think this represents a different method or material for
        > the fillet or is it just some kind of artifact of the sculptor's method?

        I don't think it's a sculpt artifact. It may be a variation on the
        pleated/coffee filter type, though. The double barbette is interesting.
        Alternately, it may be supposed to represent some kind of barbaric crown
        rather than a linen fillet.

        > Funky Fillets 3 St. Louis with Margaret of Provence,
        > I'm looking here at those three holes in the front of the fillet.

        Saints often get encrusted with jewels or imitation jewels; I'd bet that
        she had some nice rocks there which someone took off later.

        There aren't a lot of pictures of a regular veil over a fillet, so I'd
        approach this one with a bit of caution, plus of course she's a saint,
        so caution there, too.

        > Funky Fillets 4 Tomb of Knight Templar,
        > My husband says the ring around his head is to help hold the pot helm on. Is
        > he correct? Does this have any relation to the women's fillet?

        ...or it's a turban, to show he'd been to the Holy Land. I'd have to
        know more about the Templars from that time period. It doesn't look
        like it's a filet-relation to me, though; too stuffed looking.

        I look forward to hearing Danabren's ideas -- she's strong on fillets.

        --
        Cynthia Virtue and/or Cynthia du Pre Argent

        I just like the idea of mixing fire and vegetables to make art.
        -- Ermine Rat
      • danabren@verizon.net
        Sorry it s taken so long for me to answer here, trying to catch up... ... The Walters Art Galery in Baltimore has a portrait head from a tomb of a noblewoman
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 20, 2005
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          Sorry it's taken so long for me to answer here, trying to catch up...

          >> Funky Fillets 3 St. Louis with Margaret of Provence,
          >> I'm looking here at those three holes in the front of the fillet.
          >
          >There aren't a lot of pictures of a regular veil over a fillet, so I'd
          >approach this one with a bit of caution, plus of course she's a saint,
          >so caution there, too.

          The Walters Art Galery in Baltimore has a portrait head from a tomb of a noblewoman wearing a veil over a smooth fillet and barbette, with traces of hair showing at a natural hairline, unlike the saint here (who has an expression remarkably like Uta of the Nurenberg Cathedral, delightfully enough). It may have been a short-lived fashion, but there are several examples floating around.

          Also, regarding the previous image, there are several examples of caps/fillets referred to as "fluted" by Davenport, with the apparent "shaped ring". I tend to think it's a combination of sculptors choice and the stiffening of the linen into careful creases before wearing.

          http://baronmorgan.gallowglass.org/articles/cna07_plantaganetcap.html has a few of the images I'm referring to, simply awful views but you can get the basic idea.

          >> Funky Fillets 4 Tomb of Knight Templar,
          >> My husband says the ring around his head is to help hold the pot helm on. Is
          >> he correct? Does this have any relation to the women's fillet?
          >
          >...or it's a turban, to show he'd been to the Holy Land. I'd have to
          >know more about the Templars from that time period. It doesn't look
          >like it's a filet-relation to me, though; too stuffed looking.

          Or padding for his helm. What Cynthia said - don't think it's a fillet. I've worn a helmet on the field, you can't tell me that they went out unpadded! lol

          I'm withholding judgement on the first image; while I don't necessarily agree that the wrapping depicts bandages, I'd like to see a few more examples of the style, or at least get a larger view of the sculpture itself for more context.

          Those zany French and their fashion sense!
          Danabren

          ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
          Borges sumus. Resistere inutile est.
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